974-978 UNITED STATES BY STATES

Subjects Listed in This Directory

976.1 ALABAMA

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979.8 ALASKA

Lourie, Peter.  YUKON RIVER: AN ADVENTURE TO THE GOLD FIELDS
    OF THE KLONDIKE. 
   Illus.with photos.  Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills, 1992; 2000. 
    48p. 1-56397-878-4; pb., $9.95   91-77600     Age 8+     917.98

     The book begins with a map placing the Yukon Territory next to Alaska and showing where the Arctic Circle runs through both.  Another map shows Whitehorse, Laberge, Shipyard Island, Five Finger Rapids, Fort Selkirk, Dawson, and Bonanza Creek.  The book is divided into these geographic locations.  A selection from Canadian poet Robert Service appears at the beginning of the book.  This first person account of the author's  460 mile canoe trip down the Yukon River from Whitehorse to the Arctic circle, follows the route of the gold rush.  The travelogue of the territory  includes information about the gold rush that made it famous.  This book would appeal to canoers and persons interested in the gold rush, Alaska, or the Canadian Yukon.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library media specialist

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979.1 ARIZONA

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976.7 ARKANSAS 

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979.4 CALIFORNIA

McElroy, Lisa Tucker.  MEET MY GRANDMOTHER, SHE'S A UNITED STATES SENATOR.  Photos by
    Joel Benjamin.  Grandmothers at Work series.    Bookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2000.  32p.     0-7613-1721-X; lib.bdg.,
    $22.90   99-046202    92   or   328.7

     Told in the first person by Eileen Feinstein Mariano, the six-year-old tells about her grandmother, a former mayor of San Francisco and a current U. S. Senator.  Eileen calls her grandmother Gagi and explains the daily activities of Sen. Dianne Feinstein as she works in the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington, D.C.   Eileen tells of meetings with staffers and constituents, Eileen also discusses Gagi's role as a mayor.  Because of the specific information about San Francisco, the book should be included when classes are studying California.  This title can also be used for career education because the last page includes nine blocks of information entitled  "If you Want to be a United States Senator."  This second book in this series, celebrating the contribution of  older women in the workforce, is a great addition to a public library or  elementary through middle school library media centers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Nobleman, Marc Tyler.  THE SAN FRANCISCO EARTHQUAKE OF 1906. We the People Series.
          Minneapolis, MN: Compass Point Books, 2007.  48p.  ISBN: 13: 978-0-7565-2460-9
          Gr. 4-6     JUV  j979.4

          Thanks to the California Gold Rush of 1848, San Francisco, a large, natural harbor had become a city of 400,000 by 1906. Underneath the beautiful hills of the city lay the San Andreas Fault, a place where two tectonic plates met.  On the morning of April 18, 1906 those two plates slid  fifteen feet past each other with devastating results to the buildings and streets. But the out-of-control fires that consumed most homes within four days caused the greatest damage.
          This concise and well-written book is amply illustrated with photographs and paintings, relating experiences from the viewpoint of inhabitants and also describing the mistakes made in dealing with the catastrophe, such as insufficient water for fighting fires and a shoot-to-kill order to be carried out by soldiers against looters.   The account is well organized and as such makes a historical event an interesting story.
          Judy Bennett, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Rau, Margaret.  THE WELLS FARGO BOOK OF THE GOLD RUSH.
    Illus from the Wells Fargo Historical Archives.  New York: Atheneum, 2001.  143p.
    0-689-83019-X; hb., $18.00     99-028767    Gr.  6+    979.404

    According to the introduction "Wells, Fargo & Co., Banking and Express, provided financial, delivery, and letter services.  To celebrate the Golden State's sesquicentennial, Wells Fargo is pleased to support Margaret Rau's tale of gold!"   The book begins with a relief map of California Gold Mining and the discovery of gold.  January 24, 1848, James Marshall, a friend of Capt. John Sutter saw flakes in the tailrace of the sawmill.
    This book provides information that can be found in other sources about the gold rush but adds a perspective from the providers of a reliable system to escort the transfer the gold, mail, and other cargo as well as provide banking services.  Two million people visit Wells Fargo's five museums and four museum stores.  The prints, photos, and drawings about the era that come from the Wells Fargo Archives add to the understanding of the subject and appear strategically throughout the book in interesting patterns and with accompanying captions. An epilogue, bibliography, and index complete the book.
This book prepares readers for the 2002 150th anniversary of Wells Fargo.  This book provides helpful  background about the gold rush and the role of economics in American history for curriculum support.   Towns where there are branches of Wells Fargo banks will be interested in the book and the bank may provide copies for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

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978.8 COLORADO 

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974.6 CONNECTICUT 

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975.1 DELAWARE 

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975.3 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Ashabranner, Brent.  THE WASHINGTON MONUMENT: A BEACON FOR    
    AMERICA
.  Photos by Jennifer Ashabranner.  Great American Memorials.     
    Brookfield, CT:  Twenty-first Century/Millbrook, 2002.  64p.  0-7613-1524-1;
    lib.bdg., $25.90    Gr. 3+     975.3

    The Ashabranners, father and daughter, begin with a personal note about being in Washington D.C. during the Fourth of July celebration in 2001 to celebrate the 225th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence and move on to the history of the birth of our nation.  There is information about George Washington and early efforts to create a memorial to honor him that the Continental Congress passed in 1783.  The War of 1812 curtailed those efforts.  Construction began again in 1848 when the cornerstone was laid but construction stopped when they ran out of money in 1854 due to the Know-Nothing party.  The Civil War also delayed the project and the incomplete monument stood neglected for years until the nation was preparing for its centennial.  The federal government took over the project and the dedication was in 1884.  There are black and white photos of alternative designs and color pictures of views from other historic places like the Lincoln Memorial as well as pictures of those other memorials.  A photo of the monument and the crowd who heard Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.  Statistics, visitor information, a bibliography of 15 books, and an index  round out the book.  This is an important addition to school and public libraries that will be important for its historic and geographical value or for celebrating Washington’s birthday.  
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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975.9 FLORIDA 

Doherty, Kieran.  MARJORY STONEMAN DOUGLAS: GUARDIAN OF THE
    ‘GLADES.
  Brookfield, CT:  Twenty-first/Millbrook, 2002.  143p. 
    0-7613-2371-6; lib.bdg., $24.90     Gr. 7-12      333.91 

    When people think of a female environmentalist and writer, they think of Rachel Carson.  When they think of a Florida writer, they think of Marjorie Rawlings.  This biography combines the best of both in Marjorie Douglas, a suffragette, writer, fighter for civil rights, and environmental activist.
    Marjorie Stoneman grew up with an unstable, sometimes violent, mother and a father who left when she was small.   Marjorie was raised by her grandparents and an aunt who paid for her college education at Wellesley.  After a variety of jobs, she married Kenneth Douglas, a charming Irish born reporter who was an alcoholic.  An uncle helped her get out of the disastrous marriage and get in touch with her father who lived in Florida.  Marjorie lived with her father and his new wife in Miami where he was a newspaper editor.  Marjorie worked with him and wrote columns and articles about what was happening in Miami and she met some important people of the day, Clarence Darrow, William Jennings Bryan and became a friend of his wife and daughter.   During World War I, Douglas joined the U.S. Navy and later worked for the Red Cross in Paris.   When she returned to Miami in 1920, worked at the Miami Herald for her father but resigned to write short stories for magazines which she did successfully.  Between 1924 and the mid 1940s, she wrote fiction , nonfiction articles including one about piracy and one about the Everglades.  In 1927 she won the O. Henry Memorial Award contest for the best short fiction.  A friend, Hervey Allen, author of Anthony Adverse, a 1933 best seller, asked her to write a book on the Miami River to be part of a series on rivers.  Since the river was short and she learned that the river was part of the Everglades watershed, she asked to write about the Everglades.  The result was her classic Everglades:  River of Grass, published in 1947.  A fiction book was published in 1952 but did not sell well.  Over the next two and a half decades she wrote numerous nonfiction books, including some for young readers.  She also wrote magazine articles.   In 1969 she formed a group called Friends of the Everglades with dues of $1.00 and she was their vocal representative for years.  Her job was to protect the Everglades.  When her eyes grew bad in the mid 1980s, she relied on Talking Books from the Library of Congress.  At the age of 95 Douglas taped two hundred hours for Rothchild who edited her words and created her autobiography.  In 1993 Douglas received the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Clinton.  Douglas died in 1998 at the age of 108.  Since then she has been inducted into the Conservation Hall of Fame and the National Women’s Hall of Fame. This is a noteworthy biography with curriculum ties to women’s studies, Florida, conservation, ecology, and literature.       
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience of as a school library media specialist

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975.8 GEORGIA 

Santella, Andrew.  JAMES EARL CARTER JR.  Profiles of the Presidents.     
    Minneapolis:  Compass Point, 2003.  64p.  0-7565-0283-7; lib.bdg., $23.90  
    2002-003031    Gr.  3-6         973.926   or   92

    This biography of a 20th century president begins will his unknown status and attributes Carter’s election to his many speeches and handshaking, confidence, hard work, Nixon’s resignation and voter loss of faith in politicians.   The biography returns to his childhood, grade school, high school, and appointment to the U. S. Naval Academy.  Because of World War II, Carter’s class graduated in three years and he chose to work on submarines.  Carter left his new wife behind when he left for war.  Carter was in the navy for eight years until his father died and he came back to take over the family farm and business.  As a community leader, Carter took an unpopular stand on segregation.  Some offices he held were school board, Georgia state senate, and governor.  To prepare for the presidency, Carter became chairman of the Democratic National Campaign Committee.  His campaign theme was “A leader, for a change.” 
Carter defeated Ford in a close election and appointed many African-Americans to important positions.  He pardoned draft evaders during the Vietnam War which allowed people who left the country to return to the U.S., worked on human rights around the world, prepared a treaty to return the Panama Canal to Panama, improved relations with China, brokered a peace treaty in the Middle East between Sadat and Begin, worked on an energy plan, and worked on an arms treaty with the Soviet Union that never became a treaty because the Soviets invaded Afghanistan.  The role of the hostages taken in Iran and Carter’s refusal to return the ill Shah to Iran, Ted Kennedy’s candidacy, and Reagan’s popularity lost him the 1980 election.  However, Carter continued to work to free the hostages and they were freed on Reagan’s first day in office.
    Space is devoted to Carter’s service to the country and the world after leaving office: The Carter Presidential Center of Emory University in Atlanta to promote democracy, human rights, and health care throughout the world; supervising world elections; building houses for Habitat for Humanity; and publishing books.  The book ends with a photo of Jimmy and Rosalyn receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom.  The glossary includes words highlighted in the text.  At the end of the book there are statistics of his personal and public life as well as selected books written by him, a list of cabinet members, a time line of his life in one column and world events in another, and election results. A list of five book, five web sites, and three addresses of historic sites are given.  A list of U.S. presidents with years in office and an index conclude the book. 
    There is a color or black and white photo on almost every page and the text is large enough and the vocabulary is easy enough for fast reading.  This biography is recommended for school and public libraries.  
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience of as a school library media specialist

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996.9 HAWAII 

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977.3 ILLINOIS

Heinrichs, Ann.  ILLINOIS.  This Land is Your Land series.  Minneapolis/Compass    
    Point, 2003.  48p.  0-7565-0313-2; lib.bdg., $22.60    2002-002961  
    Gr.  2-5    977.3   

    There is lots of information packed in this book that will be helpful to students studying states in intermediate grades.  Readers learn about the land, cities, products, history, people, famous people, and culture.  A list of important dates from 1673 to 1997, a glossary of 11 terms that were in bold print in the text, interesting facts, statistics, symbols, the text of the stat song, and a recipe for prairie cornbread.  Short bios of 17 famous Illinoisans, two web sites, and six addresses are included.  The photos and drawings add to the text.  An effort was made to add interesting photos of the T Rex at the Field Museum, Michael Jordan, and Oreo cookies, the best-selling cookies of all time.  This is an interesting and informative book about Illiinois.   
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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977.2 INDIANA 

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977.7 IOWA 

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978.1 KANSAS

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976.9 KENTUCKY

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976.3 LOUISIANA

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974.1 MAINE

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975.2 MARYLAND

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974.4 MASSACHUSETTS

Erickson, Paul.  DAILY LIFE IN THE PILGRIM COLONY 1636.
    New York: Clarion, 2002.  48p.  0-618-05846-X; hb., $20.00
    0-395-98841-1; pb., $9.95  2001-017203   Gr.  3-7+    974.4

    This beautiful history book shares a wealth of information about the pilgrims beginning with coming to the new world on the Mayflower.  A large color photo of the Mayflower II is representative of the sharp photos taken at Plimoth Plantation that appear throughout the book.  Clear explanations accompany color photos, maps, artifacts, drawings, engravings, and documents.  The sidebars appear on blue backgrounds so they stand out from the regular text.  All of the topics are featured in double-page spreads that have an interesting balance of photos and text, including the sidebars.  The book follows the daily life of the Prentiss family of Plymouth that includes 12-year-old Isaac, 7-year-old Isaac, 16-year-old Sarah, their parents and an apprentice.  Some topics are the colony and homesteads, cooking and eating, eating, work of men and women, trade and defense, government and religion, health and medicine, and their place in history.  The book concludes with a timeline, glossary, and index.  Elementary and middle schools as well as public libraries of all sizes should purchase this book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Miller William. TITUBA.  Illus by Leonard Jenkins.  San Diego: Gulliver/Harcourt,
     2000.  32p.  0-15-201897; 2; hb.,  $16.00.   99-6332     Gr. 1-4.      974.4    or    92

    The author’s note for this picture book gives background information about Tituba, the slave who came from the Barbados to New England and was involved in the Salem witch trials.  Although Miller states in this note “This book is a creative attempt to tell her story and fill in the missing periods of her life,” the book is catalogued as nonfiction.  It should be noted that cataloging and classification are not decided by the author.  The feelings, motivation, and dialogue attributed to this famous slave are “creative” and it is surprising that it was given a B or 974.4 because it is really biographical fiction.  Because no bibliography is included and no information is given in the author’s note about sources, it is unknown if Tituba’s inspiring words at the end of the book were hers or those of the author because the dialogue at the beginning of the book is obviously created.   The illustrations were created with spray paint, acrylics, and pastels and the colors are bold and the emotions raw.  If this book is biographical fiction it is successful, if it is biography or history, it violates nonfiction rules.  Purchase based on your needs.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

St. George, Judith.  JOHN & ABIGAIL ADAMS: AN AMERICAN LOVE STORY.
    New York: Holiday, 2001.  147p.  0-8234-1571-6; hb., $22.95  00-048226 
    Gr. 4-9        92    or   973.4

    After reading two thousand letters written by the John and Abigail Adams, a gifted writer tells the story of America’s beginnings through their lives.  John began as a lawyer who rode circuit from one district courthouse to another.  Their first letters, according to the custom of the day were signed using their mythological names.  The couple began their correspondence before they were married in1764 when she was almost 20 and he was 29.  Much of their life the couple was apart, once for five straight years.  The couple were apart when John was a delegate to the First (1774) and Second (1775) Continental Congresses.  John and son Johnny (John Quincey) left for Europe in1778 where John was negotiating with the French and later John was first American ambassador to the Netherlands, and when John was negotiating the Peace treaty in Paris.  Abigail joined him when he was appointed the first American ambassador to Great Britain.
    Their first years of marriage were spent raising children and becoming active in patriotic causes.  The British passed the Stamp Act which John denounced.  While on the Massachusetts General Court, John was lawyer for the British soldiers who killed civilians at the Boston Massacre.  John wrote “The die is cast” when the Boston Tea Party and the retaliatory Coercive Acts happened.  “John nominated George Washington as commander in chief…was a key player in establishing the American navy and the corps of marines.”
    The couple had their share of sorrow in their personal lives.  A child was stillborn.  Son Charles was an alcoholic who abandoned his family and died at age 30.  Daughter Nabby died of breast cancer at age of 48.   There were also political disappointments.  John was not as charismatic as Ambassador  Benjamin Franklin while they were in Paris wooing the French.  As first ambassador to Great Britain, he was unable to gain trade concessions from them and because of his ten years abroad, people called him “His Rotundity,”  puppet of the French, and called Abigail “Her Majesty.”   There were estrangements from friends because of politics, Mercy Warren and Thomas Jefferson, which were fortunately made up before it was too late.  There was the political treachery of Alexander Hamilton.  John lost the presidency to Jefferson and although their politics were very different, he had to serve as Vice President.  Adams was not reelected and when he left office, people did not visit him like they did Washington.  Abigail died 7 years before her son became President of the U.S. and her husband outlived her.
    An interesting sidelight was that Johnny was a child in arms when his mother took him to watch the Battle of Breed’s Hill.  He went with his father to Paris and at age 13 he accompanied his father’s friend, Francis Dana, who was appointed to represent the U.S. in Russia and became Dana’s secretary because he spoke French, the common language with the Russians.  At age 17 he lived with his parent s in London where his father was ambassador, graduated from Harvard, became a U.S. Senator, American ambassador to Russia and later Great Britain, Secretary of State for Monroe, and then president. 
    St. George says, “Abigail and John were equal partners.  They were partners in raising their children.  They were partners in sharing their joy in good times and upholding each other in times of sorrow.  Now they would be partners in sharing their talents to serve the country they loved.”  “John’s and Abigail’s letters to each other were more than exchanges of affection, family news and political reports.  They were life-and love-sustaining.”  This is a good addition to collections where history of early America is needed, especially contributions of women. 
    There is a color or black and white photo on almost every page and the text is large enough and the vocabulary is easy enough for fast reading.  This biography is recommended for school and public libraries.  
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Waters, Kate.  GIVING THANKS: THE 1621 HARVEST FEAST.  Photos by Russ    
    Kendall.  New York: Scholastic, 2001.  40p.  0-439-24395-5; hb., $16.95. 
    00-050477     K-Gr. 4+    394.26   PAULIN’S PICKS

    In the preface Waters tells readers that sometime between September 21 and November 9, 1621, the Pilgrims and the Wamangoag  shared a harvest celebration. At the end of the book in a section called “More about the 1621 Harvest Feast,” Waters dispels the myth of the first Thanksgiving and says that it did not happen the way we were led to believe.  Rather it was a coincidence that the Wamangoag visiteed the Pilgrims when they were celebrating their harvest.  The photos are clear, crisp, and realistic.  The photos were taken at a three-day event that took place on October 7-9, 2000.  The story is told alternately from two first person perspectives by two boys.  Dancing Moccasin was played by a Mashpee Wampanoag from Cape Cod and Graham Lelbica, whose mother works at works at Plimoth Plantation, played Resolved White who was a real boy in 1621.   There is a bibliography of three books, information and web site for Plimoth Plantation, a glossary and a combined glossary/index.  This is an essential purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist

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977.4 MICHIGAN

Appleford, Annie.  M IS FOR MITTEN: A MICHIGAN ALPHABET
    Poetry by Kathy-jo Wargin.  Illus. by Michael G. Monroe.  Chelsea, MI:
    Sleeping Bear Press, 1999.   unp.  1-886947-73-2; hb., $15.95   99-33497    
    Gr. K-4      E   or   917.74

     Capital and small letters are given on each single or double page spread in conjunction with explanatory text.  A poem is incorporated into illustrations which cover about 3/4 of the page or pages.  Considering that the poems and text were written by different people, they work well with each other and with the illustrations to make a unified whole.   Maintaining a rhyme scheme while providing meaningful information is not easy and the result is informative and pleasing.  Perhaps this is because the total information imparted is not due solely to the poetry.   Some alphabet books are strained for difficult letters like Q,  X, and Y  but the choices for these letters are natural.  Q is for Henry Ford's first car, the Quadricycle; X marks the spot because thousands of ships have sunk in the Great Lakes; and Y is for yachts especially, the Chicago-Mackinac Yacht Race.  There are three products mentioned by name, Jiffy mix, Kellogg's Frosted Flakes, and Vernor's Ginger ale.  A is for Apples because the apple blossom is the state flower.  Because only a sentence is given, Appleford could have added the word agriculture because Michigan is known for a wide range of crops like navy beans, sugar beets, corn, and wheat among others.  This would not have been the only letter representing two concepts; for example, P has a painted turtle and the Petoskey stone, the official stone.  Cherries are another crop that represents a letter.   F could have been used for farming but it was devoted to President Gerald Ford.  This choice may have been unfortunate because the text says that he "represented Michigan in Congress for 24 years."  Had Ford been a Senator, this would have been accurate, but technically a Congressman represents a specific district, not the whole state.  This is a minor flaw that should not keep this book from being purchased for school, public, and home libraries.  Because it has lots of information about the state that is portrayed in a pleasing manner, the book will be purchased by libraries in other states to support a curriculum that includes the study other states.  All Michigan fourth grade teachers will want their own copies of this book for use while studying Michigan history.  Highly recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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977.6 MINNESOTA

Uschan, Michael.  JESSE VENTURA.  People in the News series.  San Diego: Lucent,    
    2001.  111p.  1-56006-777-2; lib.bdg., $29.94     00-010391   Gr.  3-9     977.6   or   
    92     or    796.812

    James George Janos was born in 1951 in Minneapolis.  Ventura is his wrestling name.  The book chronicles his early years, his Navy SEAL years in Vietnam, professional wrestling, movie star career, Mayor of Brooklyn Park, MN, governor of Minnesota, and ends in 2000.  Sidebars include “A Brief History of Pro Wrestling,” “Why Jesse Ventura Won,”  “Leaving the Reform Party,” and “The Infamous Playboy Interview.”  There are extensive notes for each chapter, a chronology, two books “For Further Reading,” a long list of “Works Consulted,” and an index. 
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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976.2 MISSISSIPPI

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977.8 MISSOURI

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978.6 MONTANA

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978.2 NEBRASKA

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979.3 NEVADA

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974.2 NEW HAMPSHIRE

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974.9 NEW JERSEY

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978.9 NEW MEXICO

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974.7 NEW YORK

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975.6 NORTH CAROLINA

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978.4 NORTH DAKOTA

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977.1 OHIO

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976.6 OKLAHOMA

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979.5 OREGON

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974.48 PENNSYLVANIA

 Kroll, Steven.  WILLIAM PENN:  FOUNDER OF PENNSYLVANIA. 
    Illus. by Ronald Himler.  New York: Holiday, 2000.  0-8234-1439-6; hb., $16.95    
    98-18932         92   or   974.8

     Many full-page illustrations of watercolor, gouache, and pencil enhance the text which is so packed with information that there is no room for transitions.  William's father was given an estate in Ireland for his service as a rear admiral in Cromwell's navy.  It was these estates that provided  Penn's father with his wealth.  When William was ten, laws were passed against Quakers.  When Charles II came to power, William was a student at Oxford but was expelled for refusing to attend Church of England services.  William was thrown into the Tower of London for his Quaker preaching.  Penn received his colonial charter in 1681 for several reasons, the King owed a debt to his father for loans and services and they wanted to be rid of the Quakers.  In the new world Penn make friends with the Lenni Lenape Indians.  When he returned to England he was charged with treason and later was thrown into debtor's prison.  Although most of the book is devoted to events outside Pennsylvania, the book is still useful for U.S. history programs in intermediate and middle schools because it sheds light on the various leadership in England during Penn's life as well as Penn's activities.  Despite problems, school and public libraries will find this book useful for history, biography, or geography units of study
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years as a school library media specialist

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974.5 RHODE ISLAND

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975.7 SOUTH CAROLINA

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978.3 SOUTH DAKOTA

Rau, Dana Meachen.  MOUNT RUSHMORE.  Let’s See series.  Minneapolis: Compass
    Point, 2002.  24p.  0-7565-0141-5; lib.bdg., $18.60   2001-001590   Gr. 1-3       978.3
   
    Items in dark print appear at the glossary at the end of the book with a list of five books, two web sites, two mail addresses, and an index.  Photos appear on every other page.  The text conveys lots of information and answers the following questions:  Who are the four faces? Who carved the faces? How was it carved? What were problems during carving the sculpture? How big is it?   How can people visit the site?  There are lots of names that could have used phonetic interpretations.  This is an interesting book that can be used when studying South Dakota, presidents, or National Parks.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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976.8 TENNESSEE

Stefoff, Rebecca.  AL GORE.  A Life in Politics series.  Brookfield, CT:
     Gateway/Millbrook, 1999.  48p.  1-56294-433-9; lib.bdg, $22.90
     0-7613-13329-X; pb.     93-13850  Gr.   92   or   973.929

    Libraries who do not own this book and order it now, should check to see that
the last line of the chronology been updated to include the election.  The book that includes the
update has the same ISBN numbers as the first book but information from pages 38-48 are
different beginning with a different picture on page 38.  Note that the title of the first book is AL
GORE: VICE PRESIDENT.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
     32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

 Stefoff, Rebecca.  AL GORE: VICE PRESIDENT.  Brookfield, CT:
     Milbrook, 1999. 48p.   Gateway Biography series.      0-7613-1329-X; pb., $8.95.
     93-13850     Gr. 2-5    92

     The book begins when the Gore's son was hospitalized in 1989 and they were uncertain about his future.  Al Gore was a U.S. Senator at the time and this incident made him think of the future of living things, his son's future, and his own childhood.  The book moves back to Gore's early years spent in a hotel in Washington, D.C. and the family farm in Tennessee, meeting Tipper, law school at Harvard, views of and service in the Vietnam War, enrollment in divinity school, work as a reporter, membership in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate, running for president in 1988, writing EARTH IN THE BALANCE, and being vice president.   There is emphasis on his environmental activities, with information on the impeachment of Clinton and Gore's hope to be the Democratic party's candidate for president in 2000.  Not all of the information is complementary but a balance is provided.  There are 15 full-page black and white or color photos that have informative captions but shorten the amount of text space, making the books shorter than it appears.  A chronology, list of further reading, and index are helpful.  This is an up-to-date and timely addition for elementary and middle school collections and for children and youth collections in public libraries but Stefoff's biography is also a fast read for high school students and adults who want quick and basic background information on a presidential candidate.  Replace Steffoff's earlier 1994 edition with this paperback.  This also updates Burford's AL GORE: VICE PRESIDENT (Enslow, ‘94) which is for an older audience.
        Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI;
        32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

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976.4 TEXAS

Alter, Judy.  SAM HOUSTON: A LEADER FOR TEXAS.  Community Builders series.  New York:
    Children's Press, 1998.  48p.  0-516-26331-5 pb. $6.95       Gr. 3-6      976.4  o   92

    Black and white and color photos, drawings, large print and sidebars combine to make this biography appealing.  It can be used as a biography, to provide information about Cherokees, or for information about Texas history.   This easy to read book mentions his three marriages, drinking, Six Flags over Texas, fight for Independence, the Alamo, and the defeat of Santa Anna's troops in the Battle of San Jacinto.  Houston was the first president of the Republic of Texas, and was one of the first senators.  Features include a timeline, book list, 5 online sites, and an index.  Others in series are lady Bird Johnson and Milton Hershey.  Purchase where reports about sates are needed at the intermediate level and for American history studies up through middle school.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Cohen, Daniel.  GEORGE W. BUSH: THE FAMILY BUSINESS.  Illus. with photos.
    Gateway Biographies.  Brookfield, CT: Milbrook, 2000.  48p.  0-7613-1851-8; lib.bdg.,
    $21.90    Gr. 3-6+       92  or  976.4  or   92

     Like a newspaper article that has an "angle," the author mentions several other American political families with multiple presidential aspirations: Adams, Roosevelt, Taft, and Kennedy.    Cohen tells abut George's father, brother, and grandfather (Senator).  George W. is called Junior by his supporters and "Shrub" by others.  Cohen shares Junior's good and bad points.   Bush's pluses are that he was a good boss, a good fund raiser, has a gift for making friends, was loyal to his employees, is a good family man with twins, is bilingual, and is governor to Texas.   Minuses include Bush's college experience  as a "fair student" "barely passing a "pilot aptitude' test" to get into the Air National Guard during the Vietnam War, not being accepted into the University of Texas Law school but being admitted to the Harvard Business school where he received an MBA, losing a congressional race, and receiving jobs because his father was president.  When the oil business as a whole wasn't good and his business was failing, he sold it to a larger company and made sure his employees were hired by the new company.   The new company hired Junior because of his family connections.  At age 40 he gave up drinking about the time his father was running for vice president and he worked on his father's campaign.   He went to Texas and found backers to help purchase the Houston Astros and became a managing general partner which provided him TV coverage, helped to get backing for new stadium in Arlington, which helped him to become known so he could successfully run for governor.  Although the governor of TX does not have independent power, Bush worked successfully with the legislature to accomplish his goals.  No bibliography of other young people's books about Bush is included because there aren't any but here are three web sites, an index, and a chronology   This book ends with Bush as a front runner for 2000 Republican nomination.   This title is timely, and is currently the biography for George W. Bush at this age level.  Purchase it for school library media centers serving grades 4-12 and public libraries where it will also be used by adults.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

 Cohen, Daniel.  GEORGE W. BUSH: THE FAMILY BUSINESS.  Illus. with photos.
    Gateway Biographies.  Brookfield, CT: Milbrook, 2000.  48p.  0-7613-1851-8; lib.bdg.,
    $21.90  99-054082   Gr. 3-6+   92   or   976.4

    Libraries who do not own this book and order it now, should check to see that the
last pages have been updated to include the election because the update has the same ISBN
numbers and the same title as the first book.  Differences between the two include one extra line in the chronology telling readers that Bush became president.  Pages 40-48 also contain different
information.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Wukovits, John F.  GEORGE W. BUSH.  People in the News series.  San Diego:
    Lucent, 2000.  112p. 1-56006-693-8;  hb., $18.96     Gr. 5-10      92  or   976.4

      This biography of George W. begins when he is Governor of Texas then moves to his family’s legacy in politics.  Then it goes back to young George’s school days from boarding school through Yale and the Fraternity scene, graduation and his enlistment in the Texas Air National Guard during the Vietnam War.  In 1970 George W. ran his father’s losing senatorial campaign against Lloyd Bentsen.  When he was accepted into Harvard Business School, George W. received an early release from the National Guard.  After graduation he joined the Texas oil boom and met and married Laura.   After an
unsuccessful congressional campaign, Bush sold his ailing oil business and worked for the purchasing company.  During this time he gave up alcohol and embraced religion.  George W. worked for his father’s campaign for president in 1988 then purchased the Texas Rangers with a group of investors.  The controversy of profitably selling his oil shares right before the Persian Gulf War made stocks plunge, caused critics to wonder if he had inside information.  The biography returns to Bush’s terms as governor, his governing style, education initiative, the juvenile justice system, and capital punishment.  The book ends with Bush’s campaign for the presidency and his losses in the New Hampshire and Michigan primaries.   This book is very similar to Cohen’s GEORGE W. BUSH: THE FAMILY BUSINESS (Millbrook, 2000).   The best features of this book are the extensive chapter notes, chronology, “For Further Reading,”  “Works Consulted,” and index.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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979.2 UTAH

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974.3 VERMONT

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975.5 VIRGINIA

Aronson, Marc.  SIR WALTER RALEIGH AND THE QUEST FOR
    EL DORADO. 
New York:  Clarion, 2000.  222p.  0-395-8427-X; hb., $20.00  
    99-04396   Gr. 7-12+        942.055    or    92

     A Cast of Characters at the beginning of the book lists Raleigh's relations and allies; Elizabeth's courtiers and advisors; English seamen; poets, playwrights, writers; conquistadors; and Americans.  Among those listed in the Durham House set is Thomas Harriot, who kept detailed records on a trip to the new world with Raleigh and who is featured in R. Stiger's THOMAS HARRIOT: SCIENCE PIONEER (Clarion, 1999).   Much attention was devoted to John White who drew maps and sites of the new world on a trip with Raleigh.   When White returned three years later, the Roanoke colony had disappeared including his daughter's child, Virginia Dare, the first European child born in the new world.  Sir Humphrey Gilbert, Raleigh's half brother, was "the first to set out for the new world with the aim of creating an English colony."   Sir Francis Drake was Raleigh's stepcousin and Sir Richard Grenville was his cousin.  A section of the prologue explains El Dorado and how it affected explorations to the new world.   Readers learn that Raleigh was a second son who had to make his own fortune and received lands for his role in Ireland and in the new world.  Raleigh had the patronage of Elizabeth I but she threw him into the Tower of London when he married one of her ladies in waiting without her permission.  When Elizabeth died, Raleigh was charged with high treason by her successor, James.  Other persons who receive attention in the book are Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, Essex, Shakespear, and Milton.
     The black and white maps and drawings are period pieces.  Extensive chapter notes, a six-page time line, and a detailed index add to the value of the book.  This title is useful for middle and high school students who are studying the Elizabethan Age, early exploration in the Americas, the Spanish Armada, or the early history of England.  Although this title will appear in youth collections in public libraries, it will also be useful to adults.  Don't miss this versatile biography.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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979.7 WASHINGTON

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975.4 WEST VIRGINIA

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977.6 WISCONSIN

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978.7 WYOMING

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