Dewey Guide: 900s ( US History)

Subjects Listed in This Directory


973 UNITED STATES HISTORY

Hanel, Rachael.  MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS IN AMERICA. Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press,
2009.  112 p. 978-1-4296-2013-0; hb., $27.93  lib. $20.95    Gr. 3 – 7   j973.046872

            This book is another in the interactive history adventure series.  The book is about Mexicans who choose to immigrate to the United States and why they make that decision.  However, the reader becomes the immigrant with choices to make in his/her life.  The first choice is on which immigrant to become: a migrant worker in the 1970’s, a domestic worker in the early 21st century, or a worker in a modern-day meatpacking plant.  The book is reminiscent of the” choose your own adventure” series of the late 1980’s.  The choices would help children understand the plight of the Mexicans who come into the United States.  As in many of the Capstone Press books, additional educational helps are included at the end of the book, ex. Internet sites.
            Chris Collins, Director, L’Anse School/Public Library, L’Anse, MI

Harness, Cheryl.   GHOSTS OF THE WHITE HOUSE.  Illus. by the author.
     New York:  Simon and Schuster,  1998. 48p.  0-689-80872-0; hb.  $16.00
     96-39752   Gr. 2-6.    973.09   920

     When the narrator's class goes on a field trip to the White House, George Washington steps out of a portrait on the wall and gives her a private tour.  In each room, ghosts of past presidents share interesting tidbits with her.  Sidebars with portraits and facts about the presidents help readers learn more about the two or more presidents who are shown talking to the narrator in each of the rooms.  The presidents are grouped around a theme, for example on the page showing the sidebars of Grant and Eisenhower, the two generals look at maps and books and discuss battles while other presidents who have been soldiers in various wars make comments.    The narrator sees all of the presidents' ghosts all together in the Rose Garden at the end of her tour.  Later in the book there is a drawing giving names to identify  each of those presidents.  An added feature is a double-page spread showing a timeline of presidents, their life spans,  time in office, and U.S. events as well as constitutional requirements of the office.  Pictures of the five living presidents and information about them are appears at the end of the book. There is also a bibliography.  End papers include two group portraits of the presidents which are unfortunately covered up by the book jacket flaps.  Harness provides a painless way to learn about our presidents in or out of classrooms.  The  U.P. Reading Association conference at N.M.U. invited Harness to be a speaker at the 1999 fall conference.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
     32 years experience as a school library/media specialist

St. George, Judith.  SO YOU WANT TO BE PRESIDENT?  Illus by David Small.
    Philomel/Penguin Putnam, 2000.  52p.  0-399-234007-1; hb., $17.99.   98-40002
    Gr. 2-5+      973    or    920

    This book is an interesting way to learn miscellaneous information about the 41 presidents.  The book begins “There are good things about being president and there are bad things about being President.”   One of the good things is that the president gets to live in a big white house.  The illustrations add a dimension to text; in this case, Eleanor and Franklin are shown having tea with the White House in the background.  The author says that presidents come in all shapes and sizes but chances of being president are improved if you are a male, were born in a log cabin, are musical, have a relative who was president, or have the name James, John, William, George, Andrew, or Franklin.  Because the book was written before the outcome of the Gore/Bush election, readers will have to add another George to the list and another person who has a relative who was president.   Tidbits of information are shared with humor and irony.  A president has lots of homework.  Harding, the handsomest president was one of the worst and Lincoln, one of the ugliest, was one of the best.  Illustrated during the height of the impeachment trial, Clinton’s legacy with Caldecott readers will forever be a full-page picture of him walking down the steps of the Lincoln Memorial with his head down and his hands behind his back while Nixon lurks on the bottom of the opposite page.
    There is a key to the illustrations; a bibliography; a numbered list with when and where they were born and died; and a sentence of concerns during their presidency.  A drawback is not agreeing with the specific soundbite provided for some presidents; conservative presidents fare better than liberal ones.  This is an important purchase in Michigan where David Small lives.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    *Editor’s Note.  This book was an Honor Book for the MITTEN AWARD, given by the
      Children’s Services Division of  the Michigan Library Association.
    *Editor’s Note.  This book is the winner of the 2001 Caldecott Medal.

 

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973.1 U.S HISTORY -- EXPLORATION

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973.2 U.S HISTORY -- COLONIAL

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973.3 U.S. HISTORY--REVOLUTION

Adler, David A.  B. FRANKLIN, PRINTER.  New York:  Holiday, 2001.  126p.
    0-8234-1675-5; hb., $19.95  2001-024535  Gr. 4+   973.3  or   92

    The black and white illustrations on almost every page add greatly to this complete biography.  There are engravings, paintings, drawings, facsimiles of publication pages, and prints.  There are numerous full page or double page excerpts from Franklin's publications including cartoons, letters, newsletters, almanacs, newspapers, and pamphlets. .  It is the primary sources that make this book special.  Extra features include diagrams of inventions on the end papers, a map showing Franklin's travels, chronologies, extensive source notes, four recommended web sites, selected bibliography, and index.  The title comes from what Franklin wanted on his tombstone.  Although this title contains the information included in Giblin's THE AMAZING LIFE OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN (Scholastic, 2000) Adler’s title is longer, more extensive, and for an older audience.  Adler has another title in print, A PICTURE BOOK OF BEN FRANKLIN (Holiday, 1990) that is also for a younger audience and BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, PRINTER, INVENTOR, STATESMAN (Holiday, 1992) that is out of print.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

Fradin, Dennis Brindell.  LET IT BEGIN HERE! LEXINGTON & CONCORD: FIRST
            BATTLES OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 
Illus. by Larry  Day.  New York:
            Walker & Company, 2005.   ISBN 0802789455 hb. $16.95     Gr. 2-6    j973.3 FR

           "Suddenly, a shot rings out." The story of the American Revolution is recounted by author Dennis Fradin and fits his young audience. In a time-line format, he recaps history, familiar characters, famous towns and battlefields – and all this in the short span of two days from April 18 to April 19, 1775.
            A Who’s Who starts the first page off with Samuel Adams, the Boston Tea Party organizer, and ends with the same list of twelve people in What Happened to the People last page. A good “Whose side were they on?” and “What they contributed” list made simple.   The excellent full page, colored illustrations create a serious mood as the redcoats or lobsterbacks encounter resistance from the American militiamen.
            This book is perfect for teaching students who, what and where - complete with illustrations and a simple map of the Thirteen colonies. Fradin recaps the accounts of the Battles of Lexington and Concord that began the Revolutionary War. The author stresses how the Americans showed England and the rest of the world that they would fight for their freedom. Independence would cost many lives and take eight years. These bloody battles contributed to winning a war that began one spring morning on April 19, 1775, in Lexington and Concord.
            Jana Aho, Media Assistant, Gladstone School & Public Library, Gladstone, MI

Fradin, Dennis Brindell.  THE SIGNERS: THE FIFTY-SIX STORIES BEHIND THE
    DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.
  Illus by Michael McCurdy.  New York: 
    Walker, 2002.  164p.  0-8027-8849-1; hb., $22.95  0-8027-8850-5; lib.bdg., $23.85         
    20002-066364     Gr. 4-9       973.3   or   920

    According to the introduction “The British targeted the fifty-six signers for special punishment.  The homes of twelve signers were burned, and nearly twenty of them lost much of what they owned.”  The stories of these men are told state by state with a chart showing their vital statistics and a map of where that state resided among the original thirteen.  There is also a descriptive phrase, a signature, a portrait, and one picture per person.  The scratchboard illustrations add significantly to the text and provide an old-world tone.  A facsimile of “The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America complete with signatures is included as well as a copy of the Declaration of Independence in regular type are included.  There is an extensive bibliography and an index.  This handsome book will be welcome by intermediate, middle, and high school students.
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience of as a school library media specialist

Freedman, Russell.  GIVE ME LIBERTY!: THE STORY OF THE DECLARATION OF
          INDEPENDENCE.
 New York:  Holiday House, 2000.  90p.  ISBN: 9780823414482
          hb. $24.95.     Gr. 4-8     j973.3

          Freedman presents the events and principal participants in American History leading up to the writing of the Declaration of Independence.  Specific battles are detailed. Freedman also incorporates details about the role of women and blacks to the revolutionary war.  This book includes a Table of Contents, Chronology of Events, Bibliography and Index.  The Declaration of Independence is included in the book.  This book is highly recommended as a study of the events leading up to the writing of the Declaration of Independence and the history of the United States from 1775-1783.
          Denise Engel Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Furbee, Mary R. WOMEN OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.
     Illus. with drawings and maps.  History Makers Series.  San Diego:  Lucent, 1999.
     101p.   1-56006-489-7; lib.bdg., $23.70  Gr. 5-12.   920       or   973.3

     Furbee believes that there were women of the Revolutionary period whose contributions and stories deserve to be remembered and honored.  This book ensures they will be.  The life stories of the six women presented are full of interesting facts and historical insights.  Three of the biographies in the collection are of special interest.  Peggy Shippen Arnold, wife of the infamous traitor Benedict Arnold, is still somewhat a mystery.  Was she innocent and shocked by her husband's deeds, as she acted, or was she, as the author suggests, equally involved in spying?
        Phillis Wheatley was captured in Africa at age seven and brought to Boston as a slave.  She became a renowned poet and free Negro.  Her writings brought into focus the struggle of blacks and women and the fact that all creatures desire freedom.  Interestingly, though, she was much poorer as a free person than she had been as a slave.  Most intriguing is the story of Deborah Sampson who disguised herself as a man and joined the colonial army where she was wounded twice and recognized for valor.  When the truth about her gender was revealed it proved that women could serve successfully in armed combat.
        Other women profiled are Abigail Adams, Esther DeBerdt Reed, and Mercy Otis Warren. The book is nicely bound with drawings of four of the women gracing the cover.  It appears to be well researched and gives many insights into the lives and times of women during the American Revolution.  The13 pages of notes, references, and index are helpful.  This title would be a valuable addition to a library's American history, women's studies, or biography sections.  There isn't much on this topic and this is a solid choice.
    Ragene Henry, teacher, Sawyer Elementary, Gwinn Public Schools, Gwinn, MI
    *Editor's note: Ragene was a "Teacher of the Year" for the Marquette-Alger Reading Council.

Giblin, James Cross.  THE AMAZING LIFE OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.
    Illus by Michael Dooling.  New York:Scholastic, 2000.  48p.
    0-590-48534-2; hb., $17.95   98-44737   Gr. 3-7  973.3  or   92

    Oil paintings help readers understand what life was like for this "founding father."  Readers learn that Franklin was the youngest of ten sons in a family of seventeen children.  The not publicized fact that Franklin's only son, Governor of New Jersey, was on the British side during the Revolution is interesting.  The book begins with Franklin's birth in Boston; working at age ten in his father's candle-and-soap making shop; a job he hated.  His father apprenticed him to his brother for nine years in his print shop without pay until he was twenty-one years old.  He left Boston and his brother and at age eighteen opened his own print shop in New York City.  All the known information about Franklin like POOR RICHARD'S ALMANACK, his contribution as diplomat, inventor, peace negotiator, convention delegate, founder of libraries, schools, and hospitals.  The book concludes with a chronology, some information about inventions, and numerous sayings from his almanac; information about historic sites associated with him, a bibliography/source notes, artist's note, and index.  Franklin is an amazing man and this is an amazing biography.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

 Kroll, Steven.  THE BOSTON TEA PARTY. Illus. by Peter Fiore. New York: Holiday, 1998. 32p.
     0-8234-1316-0, lib.bdg.,  $16.95.      96-54855     Gr. 3-8+    973.3

     What a painless way to learn about the Sugar Act of 1764, Stamp Act of 1765,  Sons of Liberty, Long Room Club, Committees of Correspondence, and the Boston Tea Party.   An afterword explains what happened after the Boston Tea Party and the  "Important Dates" section begins with the Sugar Act and ends with the Battle of Lexington and Concord.  The watercolor illustrations on canvas evoke the spirit of the times to enhance the meaning of the text.  This book will be useful to the American history curriculum for intermediate and middle school as well as adult education students.  Public libraries will find that this book will be checked out by people of all ages.  Highly recommended.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
     32 years experience as a school library/media specialist

Murray, Stuart.  AMERICAN REVOLUTION.  Eyewitness series.  London: Dorling Kindersley, 2002.  64p. 
          ISBN 0-7894-8556-7; hb., $15.99   0-7894-8557-5; lib.bdg.,  $19.99     Gr. 3-9     973.3

    Each double-page spread contains maps, drawings, photos, and artifacts with captions and a quarter of a page of text.  Many of the illustrations are from the Smithsonian Institution.  The first topic was “Life in British America” and the last was “George Washington--Father of His Country.”  Other topics include how the unrest became revolution, recruiting and training, individual battles, camps and prisons, doctors, spies and traitors, and attacks on the frontier.  All schools where the American Revolution is studied should own this book.  Public libraries will also find this a valuable addition.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Nardo, Don.  THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE: A MODEL FOR
    INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS.  Words that Changed History Series.  San Diego, CA:
     Lucent, 1999.  96p.  1-56006-368-8; lib.bdg., $22.45     98-7338   Gr. 6+     973.3

    Be it the written or spoken word, both reflect and shape America's history and this works by historian and award winning author, Nardo reflects how important speeches and documents have influenced out country, its beliefs, laws and public opinion.  It details the importance and significance of this famous document and what it symbolized.  The text is compelling enough to hold a child's interest, but not so complicated that it is hard to follow.  Interspersed are numerous black and while historical pictures and paintings as well as copies of articles and excerpts of lesser documents to help develop a more realistic understanding of this monumental shaping of history.  The text is preceded by a forward which explains to the young reader how "Many primary and  secondary source quotes give readers insight into the thoughts of the document's contemporaries as well as those who interpret the document's significance in hindsight."  Also included are source notes, reading lists, and bibliography.  The book would be a welcomed supplement to any classroom or  public or school library.
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
     23 years of experience as a teacher and librarian

St. George, Judith.  JOHN & ABIGAIL ADAMS: AN AMERICAN LOVE STORY.
    New York: Holiday, 2001.  147p.  0-8234-1571-6; hb., $22.95    Gr. 4-9      973.4

    After reading two thousand letters written by the John and Abigail Adams, a gifted writer tells the story of America’s beginnings through their lives.  John began as a lawyer who rode circuit from one district courthouse to another.  Their first letters, according to the custom of the day were signed using their mythological names.  The couple began their correspondence before they were married in1764 when she was almost 20 and he was 29.  Much of their life the couple was apart, once for five straight years.  The couple were apart when John was a delegate to the First (1774) and Second (1775) Continental Congresses.  John and son Johnny (John Quincey) left for Europe in1778 where John was negotiating with the French and later John was first American ambassador to the Netherlands, and when John was negotiating the Peace treaty in Paris.  Abigail joined him when he was appointed the first American ambassador to Great Britain.
    Their first years of marriage were spent raising children and becoming active in patriotic causes.  The British passed the Stamp Act that John denounced.  While on the Massachusetts General Court, John was lawyer for the British soldiers who killed civilians at the Boston Massacre.  John wrote “The die is cast” when the Boston Tea Party and the retaliatory Coercive Acts happened.  “John nominated George Washington as commander in chief…was a key player in establishing the American navy and the corps of marines.”
    The couple had their share of sorrow in their personal lives.  A child was stillborn.  Son Charles was an alcoholic who abandoned his family and died at age 30.  Daughter Nabby died of breast cancer at age of 48.   There were also political disappointments.  wooing the French.  As first ambassador to Great Britain, he was unable to gain trade concessions from them and because of his ten years abroad, people called him “His Rotundity,”  puppet of the French, and called Abigail “Her Majesty.”   There were estrangements from friends because of politics, Mercy Warren and Thomas Jefferson, which were fortunately made up before it was too late.  There was the political treachery of Alexander Hamilton.  John lost the presidency to Jefferson and although their politics were very different, he had to serve as Vice President.  Adams was not reelected and when he left office, people did not visit him like they did Washington.  Abigail died 7 years before her son became President of the U.S. and her husband outlived her.
    An interesting sidelight was that Johnny was a child in arms when his mother took him to watch the Battle of Breed’s Hill.  He went with his father to Paris and at age 13 he accompanied his father’s friend, Francis Dana, who was appointed to represent the U.S. in Russia and became Dana’s secretary because he spoke French, the common language with the Russians.  At age 17 he lived with his parent s in London where his father was ambassador, graduated from Harvard, became a U.S. Senator, American ambassador to Russia and later Great Britain, Secretary of State for Monroe, and then president. 
    St. George says, “Abigail and John were equal partners.  They were partners in raising their children.  They were partners in sharing their joy in good times and upholding each other in times of sorrow.  Now they would be partners in sharing their talents to serve the country they loved.”  “John’s and Abigail’s letters to each other were more than exchanges of affection, family news and political reports.  They were life-and love-sustaining.”  This is a good addition to collections where history of early America is needed, especially contributions of women. 
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience of as a school library media specialist

Winnick, Karen B.  SYBIL'S NIGHT RIDE.  Illus. by the author.  Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills, 2000.  
     32p.  1-56397-697-8; hb., $15.95.  99-62243     Gr. 1-5+      973.33

     In the Author's Note at the beginning of the book, Wannick tells readers that there are historic markers along the route this young Revolutionary War heroine took.  Late one night Sybil Ludington's father, who was head of a militia colonel, returned home just before a young man rode in telling him that the British were burning Danbury.  The messenger and his horse were too tired to continue and Sybil's father had to stay to organize the men to fight, so Sybil changed into her father's old breeches and rode off on the colt she had been training.  Sybil rode through the rain and darkness telling patriot farmers that the British were burning Danbury.   An encounter with a deer and a loyalist farmer add excitement to the story.  The end papers are a map from the William L. Clements Library, a research library at the University of Michigan.  This is a welcome story to show that females made a contribution during the Revolutionary War.  Purchase for intermediate and middle school collections to enhance the U.S. history studies or for public library collectios.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist


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978 U.S. HISTORY -- FRONTIER AND PIONEER LIFE

Adler, David.  A PICTURE BOOK OF SACAGAWEA.  Illus. by Dan Brown.
    Picture Book Biography series.  New York: Holiday, 2000.  32p.
    0-8234-1485-X; hb., $16.95.   99-37135     Gr.  K-3  92   or     978.004

    Now that Sacgawea (Sacajawea)  is on the new dollar coin, interest in her has accelerated.  This picture book gives a clear picture of who Sacagawea was and her contribution to the Lewis and Clark Expedition.  Besides being an interpreter, she set the natives at ease because war parties did not travel with a woman and child.  The text is up to Adler's excellent standards but the illustrations unfortunately do not support the text.  Although no one knows what Sacagawea looked like, this likeness looks more Hispanic than Native American.  We do know what Thomas Jefferson looked like and this likeness does not do him justice.  A chronology, author's note and bibliography add to the value of the book.  Purchase this title only when a shorter, easier book abut Sacagawea is needed.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Calabro, Marian.  THE PERILOUS JOURNEY OF THE DONNER PARTY. 
     New York: Clarion, 1999.  192p.    0-395-86610-3; hb., $20.00    Gr. 4-10+    979.4

     A map tracing the journey from Springfield, IL to Sutter's Fort, CA is included at the beginning of the book to offer readers a pictorial view of  the cutoffs taken by the Donner Party as well the usual route.  Also helpful is the list of the 32 family members and employees who left Springfield in April, 1846and the chronology and roster of the dead at the end of the book.  A number of books for young readers, videos, and web sites as well as an extensive bibliography complete the book. The text reads like an adventure story;  it is one of the most celebrated and gruesome stories in American History.   Most Americans have heard of the Donner Party but only know that they were a lost wagon train who had to eat each other to survive.  They are often thought of as a group but Calabro brings the party alive as individuals and provides readers with interesting, little known details about the trip.  The group could have been called the Reed party because James Reed and the Donner Brothers were successful men who went into this venture together.  We learn a lot about the Reed family, especially 12-year-old Virginia the tomboy, her grandmother who dies early in the venture, her mother who travels in luxury in her Pioneer Palace Car, her father's fall from grace when he kills another party member and is banished  from the train, her father's rescue mission, and their subsequent good fortune in California.  Because of George Donner's ad in the newspaper a number of single men came along as teamsters whose job was to walk beside the oxen all the way to California.    Mary Lincoln probably saw the party leave Springfield.
    The Breen family of Iowa were Irish immigrants who joined the part later.  Hastings wrote a  book which told travelers of the shortcut he had never taken.  Males over the age of 14 voted on wagon train matters like whether or not to take the "shortcut."  It was disappointing to learn that Jim Bridger lied to the party just to sell them supplies.  The men who killed the scouts were never brought to trial because killing Indians was not a crime.  The families kept their own supplies and prepared their own dwellings during the fateful winter.  A German who beat his wife, may have killed one of the women and eaten her.  There was a protocol to eating others, family members were spared from eating a relative.
     Statistics are interwoven and provide interesting information about the trip: there were 9 original wagons;  women had a higher survival rate then men;  of the 43 teenagers and children, almost two out of three survived but more than half of them lost both parents and were orphans when they reached California.  Only two families made it to California without loss of life.  In 1996, at the 150th anniversary of the start of the journey, 450 of the 2,500 descendants held a reunion.   Charts showing amounts of food per adult brought along and the number of overland emigrants going to Oregon and California between 1840 and 1850 add interest to the text.
     Especially interesting is the chapter about the survivors, told person by person.  A 12-year-old boy who was rescued died from overeating.  Virginia Reed died at age 87.   The information about each family is extensive and required much research.
 A number of letters and diary entries are provided so this book could be used to explain  primary sources.  Calabro discusses various memoirs written after the disaster and their probable validity.   Black and white photos, drawings, and maps of party members, sites, and monuments, are disbursed throughout the text at appropriate places and add interest to the saga.  This well-rounded chronicle will be useful to intermediate, middle and high school history students learning about settling the American West but it will also be picked up because of its by readers of all ages because of it's name recognition  Share this book with readers who were fascinated with the Titanic disaster.   Highly recommended.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
     32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

 Haskins, Jim.  THE GEOGRAPHY OF HOPE: BLACK EXODUS FROM THE SOUTH 
    AFTER RECONSTRUCTION.
   Brookfield, CT: Twenty-First century, 1999.   144p.  
    0-7613-0323-5; lib.bdg.,  $29.90   98-33266    Gr. 7+    973.04   or   973.8

     This book documents the exodus of freed slaves, who following the Civil War, headed for the newly opened frontier of Kansas and Oklahoma.  Historical photographs, lithographs, posters, and inside cover maps support the story of this struggle for equality.  A chronology, bibliography, index, and source notes attest to the accuracy of this sad chapter in African-American history.  Aimed at young adults, readers of all ages will find this book useful in understanding the impetus for the westward movement of 20,000 freed people, their battle against discrimination, and the hardships of homesteading this new land.
    Phyllis Kruse, L'Anse, MI

Patent, Dorothy Hinshaw.  ANIMALS ON THE TRAIL WITH LEWIS AND CLARK.
    Photos by William Munoz.  New York:  Clarion, 2002.  118p.
    0-395-91415-9; hb., $18.00   2001-042200  Gr. 4-9+  917.804

    Beginning with a map of the Lewis and Clark’s Expedition from 1804-1806, readers learn why the expedition was organized, where it went, and what the explorers learned about animals.  The photos of animals they found along the way are exceptionally clear and colorful.  Phrases from the diaries occur throughout the book.  Four web sites appear at the end of the book along with books in a section called “To Learn More.”  The most unique part is seven-page  “Chronology of Animal Discoveries New to Science,” a list of 121 new species of animals identified on the expedition and recorded in the journals.   The date, name, and place is given for each animal. An index concludes the book.  There are lots of books about the Lewis and Clark Expedition but none focuses solely on the animals.  This is an outstanding science and history book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist

Rau, Margaret.  THE WELLS FARGO BOOK OF THE GOLD RUSH.
    Illus from the Wells Fargo Historical Archives.  New York: Atheneum, 2001.  143p.
    0-689-83019-X; hb., $18.00     99-028767    Gr.  6+    979.404

    According to the introduction "Wells, Fargo & Co., Banking and Express, provided financial, delivery, and letter services.  To celebrate the Golden State's sesquicentennial, Wells Fargo is pleased to support Margaret Rau's tale of gold!"   The book begins with a relief map of California Gold Mining and the discovery of gold.  January 24, 1848, James Marshall, a friend of Capt. John Sutter saw flakes in the tailrace of the sawmill.
    This book provides much information that can be found in other sources about the gold rush but adds a perspective from the providers of a reliable system to escort the transfer the gold, mail, and other cargo as well as provide banking services.  Two million people visit Wells Fargo's five museums and four museum stores.  The prints, photos, and drawings about the era that come from the Wells Fargo Archives add to the understanding of the subject and appear strategically throughout the book in interesting patterns and with accompanying captions. An epilogue, bibliography, and index complete the book.
    This book prepares readers for the 2002 150th anniversary of Wells Fargo.  This book provides helpful  background about the gold rush and the role of economics in American history for curriculum support.   Towns where there are branches of Wells Fargo banks will be interested in the book and the bank may provide copies for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

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973.6 U.S. HISTORY--MEXICAN WAR

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973.7 U.S. HISTORY--CIVIL WAR

BOOTH, JOHN WILKES.
Steve Otfinoski, Steve.  JOHN WILKES BOOTH AND THE CIVIL WAR.
    Illus. with photos.  Notorious Americans and Their Times Series.  Woodbridge, CT:
    Blackbirch, 1999. 78p.   1567112226     98-11571   Gr.3-9+     92   or   973.7

    Rather than limit this book to the short life of Booth (he died at age 27), the author sets the life story of the man who assassinated Abraham Lincoln against the backdrop of the Civil War.  The ninth of ten children Booth did not have the smarts to become and engineer or scientist, but he was impulsive--a trait which eventually led him to commit murder.  Historical photographs, maps and printed memorabilia contribute to the authenticity of the publication.  The time lines, glossary, source notes, further readings and web sites make the book practical as well as helpful and informative for a student report.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
    23 years of experience as a school or public librarian

Egger-Bovet, Howard and Marlene Smith-Baranzini.  (USKIDS HISTORY) BOOK OF THE
    AMERICAN CIVIL WAR   Illus by D.J. Simpson.Brown Paper School Series. New York:
    Little, 1998.  96p.   0-316-22239-9, hb.  $22.95.   0-316-22324-7, pb.,  $14.45.   98-12849
    Gr. 4-9    973.7

     As part of the Brown Paper School USKids History Series, Egger-Bovet and Smith-Baranzini create an informative and insightful glimpse into everyday life prior to and during the Civil War.  First person narratives from diaries and authentic documents tell of a young girl breaking family and state laws while teaching her maid servant to read; of a 14-year-old Union drummer, who while wounded maneuvers through gunfire, delivers an important message to General Sherman; and of a freedman's defense of his home against a posse sent to capture runaway slaves taking refuge on his land.   The photographs and black and white illustrations on every page, along with the sidebars and inserts, will attract and inform even the reluctant reader.  Over 20 activities with clear instructions aimed at the later elementary student provide a source for projects and reports not found in traditional encyclopedias.  A complete, descriptive Table of Contents and notes are included in addition to an index.  An excellent book for an individual, a classroom, or school library.
     Jean Plummer; Librarian,  Kingsford Middle School Media Center,
     Breitung Township Schools,  Kingsford, MI;   English teacher and librarian for 23 years

 Holzer, Harold, comp.  ABRAHAM LINCOLN THE WRITER: A TREASURY OF HIS
    GREATEST SPEECHES AND LETTERS.  Illus. with photos.  Honesdale, PA:
    Boyds Mills, 2000.  107p.  1-56397-772-9; hb., 15.95    99-66551 Gr. 6+    973.7   or   810

     In the introduction, readers learn that Lincoln had the Lincoln-Douglas debates printed as a book because he wanted his views known and not thrown out with the newspapers.  He also wrote his speeches with an eye to publication.  Excerpts from five of those debates are included as well as 11 from his Illinois years, 1825-1860 and 15 from his White House years, 1861-65.  Lincoln's more famous speeches are included in the book:   "House Divided," " Gettysburg  Address," and "Emancipation Proclamation."   With more emphasis being placed on primary sources, this book is an excellent purchase for middle, high school, university, and public library collections.   The photos themselves come from the beginning of photography and reflect that quality.  Also useful are a chronology, index, and list of 13 places to visit connected with Lincoln.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Morrison, Taylor.  CIVIL WAR ARTIST.  Illus. by the author.  New York: Walter Lorraine/
     Houghton Mifflin, 1999.   32p.  0-395-91426-4, hb. $16.00. 97-52738  Gr. 4-6+    070.4

     Mathew Brady is a well-known Civil War photographer, but most people do not know that contemporary technology couldn't convert the photos for use  in the newspapers.  Instead, William Forbes provided sketches of battles for Burton's Illustrated News in New York City.  Illustrations and text tell how the sketches were turned into wood engravings.  Readers learn how 35 blocks of Turkish boxwood were worked on by many artists, inked, waxed, and put through the press to prepare an engraving which would appear in the newspaper four weeks after a battle. A glossary explains printing and historical terms. This picture book can be used in a variety of situations and at many levels from intermediate grades through college  by art teachers who want to explain how engravings were made and history teachers who want materials to expand  the Civil War.  Public librarians will want to direct adult patrons interested in art to this books.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
     32 years experience as a school library/media specialist

Rappaport, Doreen.  FREEDOM RIVER.  Illus by Bryan Collier.  New York:
    Jump at the Sun/Hyperion, 2000.  32p.  0-7868-0350-9; hb., $14.99
    0-7868-2291-0; lib.bdg.,  $15.49  99-33438    K-Gr. 3+    973.7   PAULIN’S PICKS

    From the end papers showing a period map of the Ohio River showing Ohio on one side and Kentucky on the other to the torn paper collages and text against light colored background accented with another collage; this is an exquisite book.   According to the historical note at the end of the book, John Parker was born in 1827 in Virginia to a slave mother and white father.  Eventually he became a free man in Ripley, Ohio where his house is now a museum.  Additional books and websites conclude the book Across the Ohio River from Ripley was Kentucky, a slave state.  Parker, who owned a successful foundry, was an active conductor on the Underground Railroad who risked his own freedom to cross the river to bring slaves to freedom.  The incident in this book tells about a slave who changed his mind about leaving his Kentucky plantation because he couldn’t leave his wife and baby.  Because the slave’s owner was afraid to loose a valuable slave, he kept the man’s baby in his own house at night.  John’s challenge was to bring the whole family to freedom in Ohio.  The text engages the senses of readers by using large type to ask readers to “Wait, wait.  Listen. Listen.”  The illustrations engage the senses through the most profound and realistic cut paper collages which readers have to carefully examine to see that yes, indeed, they are collages.  Intermediate and middle school teachers will use this book in social studies classes to show the human side of slavery and in art classes to show a masterful use of collage.  This exemplary nonfiction picture book is a first purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist
 
Sullivan, George.  PICTURING LINCOLN: FAMOUS PHOTOGRAPHS THAT    
    POPULARIZED THE PRESIDENT.
  New York:  Clarion, 2000.  88p. 
    0-395-91682-8; hb., $16.00    00-027576    Gr. 4-9+    973.7   or     92

    Sullivan takes a different approach to this popular president; he shares Lincoln through his photos and portraits.  Photography had just been invented when Lincoln had his first portrait in 1846 with a daguerreotype.  In order to reproduce likenesses, engravers made wood blocks or stone lithographs based on the photos and used them for newspapers, magazines, fliers, postcards, posters, medals, and campaign buttons.  Many engravings were based on Hesler’s photo of Lincoln with the uncombed hair, which became known as the “Wigwam print.”  Many of the other photos had names like the “Cooper Union likeness” that was distributed for the campaign of 1860.  Family portraits were included as well as mementos after Lincoln’s death. 
    People interested in postage stamps and coins will also be interested in this book that contains information about Lincoln’s likenesses for those mediums.  The first Lincoln penny was produced in 1909 and pictures of both sides are shown.  A large 2000 Lincoln penny appears on the back cover of the book.  Information about the five-dollar bill portrait is included--both the old one and the new one introduced in 2000.   There are chapter notes, a list of a dozen books, and an index that uses italic numbers to refer to illustrations or captions.   The writing is smooth, the illustrations are clear, and the book can be read all the way through or just selected areas of interest.  This book has many uses; it is a good book for Presidents’ Day, history, elections, biography, stamps, and coins.  Purchase for school and public libraries. 
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience of as a school library media specialist


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973.8 U.S. HISTORY--RECONSTRUCTION

Haskins, Jim.  THE GEOGRAPHY OF HOPE: BLACK EXODUS FROM THE SOUTH
    AFTER RECONSTRUCTION.   Brookfield, CT: Twenty-First century, 1999.   144p.
    0-7613-0323-5; lib.bdg.,  $29.90   98-33266    Gr. 7+    973.04   or   973.8

     This book documents the exodus of freed slaves, who following the Civil War, headed for the newly opened frontier of Kansas and Oklahoma.  Historical photographs, lithographs, posters, and inside cover maps support the story of this struggle for equality.  A chronology, bibliography, index, and source notes attest to the accuracy of this sad chapter in African-American history.  Aimed at young adults, readers of all ages will find this book useful in understanding the impetus for the westward movement of 20,000 freed people, their battle against discrimination, and the hardships of homesteading this new land.
    Phyllis Kruse
    L'Anse

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973.913-15 U.S. HISTORY--1920S; PROHIBITION

Brown, Don.  TEDDIE:  THE STORY OF YOUNG TEDDY ROOSEVELT.  Bostton:
          Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009.  ISBN: 978-0-618-17999-2 hb. $16.00.  Gr. 3-6  j973.91

          Who would believe that the macho Teddy Roosevelt, leader of the Rough Riders, was once a sickly, frail boy with weak eyes?  Just how did the "delicate", bullied youth ever rise above his weaknesses and become the gun-toting, horseback riding,trust-busting President of the United States? The pen and water-washed illustrations bring out the timidity of the young "Teedy" yet they also show his daring and curious nature.  This is an excellent introduction to the physically flawed, very human boy who was able, through sheer determination, to stand up to wrong when he saw it and rise to greatness.
          Mary Olmsted, Librarian, Tahquamenon Area School Public Library

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973.916-17 U.S. HISTORY--1930S; DEPRESSION

Grapes, Bryan J., ed.  FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT.  Presidents and their Decisions
    series.  San Diego: Greenhaven, 2001.  256p.  0-7377-0504-3; lib.bdg., $32.45
    0-7377-0503-5; pb., $21.20   Gr. 5-10+     973.917   or   92 

    Pages 12-46 are devoted to a biography of FDR that includes his public service. Then each chapter is devoted to a topic essays are included by people with differing viewpoints on how he handled key decisions.  Topics include the New Deal, the Supreme Court packing plan, World War II, and treatment of minorities including African Americans, the Japanese threat, and Jewish refugees.  Care is taken to include background on the social, political, and economic factors he faced.  The appendix includes 17 speeches or executive orders.  There is a chronology, bibliography, and index. Other presidents in the series include:  Clinton, L. Johnson, Nixon, and Reagan.  Any curriculum that includes study of the twentieth century needs these books for support.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist


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973.917-18 U.S. HISTORY -- 1940s

Grapes, Bryan J., ed.  FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT.  Presidents and their Decisions    
    series.  San Diego: Greenhaven, 2001.  256p.  0-7377-0504-3; lib.bdg., $32.45
    0-7377-0503-5; pb., $21.20   Gr. 5-10+     973.917   or   92 

    Pages 12-46 are devoted to a biography of FDR that includes his public service. Then each chapter is devoted to a topic essays are included by people with differing viewpoints on how he handled key decisions.  Topics include the New Deal, the Supreme Court packing plan, World War II, and treatment of minorities including African Americans, the Japanese threat, and Jewish refugees.  Care is taken to include background on the social, political, and economic factors he faced.  The appendix includes 17 speeches or executive orders.  There is a chronology, bibliography, and index.  Other presidents in the series include:  Clinton, L. Johnson, Nixon, and Reagan.  Any curriculum that includes study of the twentieth century needs these books for support.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist



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973.918-21 U.S. HISTORY -- 1950s

Adler, David.  A PICTURE BOOK OF DWIGHT DAVID EISENHOWER
    A Picture Book of series.  New York: Holiday, 2002.  32p.  0-8234-1702-6; hb.,
    $16.95      2002-017149    Gr. K-3+    973.921’092  or  92 

    The first two pages show the general at a parade in New York City after his return from World War II with an explanation of why he was honored.  Then Adler returns to Eisenhower’s childhood and takes him through West Point, a  distinguished Army career including leader at D-Day and first commander of NATO, president, and his final days.  There is a black and white photo on every page except one to capture interest and add to understanding the text.  The drawing on the front cover by Adler is at odds with the photos within the book.  Adler’s book ends with a list of “Important Dates,” an “Author’s Note” that explains more about “Ike,” a “Selected Bibliography,” and five “Recommended Web Sites.”  This is another successful book to a successful series.
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience of as a school library media specialist


Lindop, Edmund.  AMERICA IN THE 1950s.  Brookfield, CT:  21st  Century/Millbrook,
    2002.   0-7613-2551-4; lib.bdg., $25.90    2001-052254   Gr. 7+    973.921

    Everything one expects of this decade is included:  the hydrogen bomb, the Cold War, Korean War, the MacArthur/Truman feud, the Red Scare, Rosenberg spy trial, McCarthyism,  Ike’s election, African Americans and racial justice, Brown vs. the Board of Education, integration at Little Rock, Montgomery bus boycott, bomb shelters, Hungarian revolution, Sputnik and the beginning of the space age, Castro’s takeover of Cuba, moving to suburbia and Levittown, autos and superhighways, Salk’s polio vaccine, Alaska and Hawaii statehood, early television programs and quiz scandals, crinolines, movie stars like Grace Kelly, Broadway musicals (Music Man, My Fair Lady, West Side Story, and the Sound of Music), Presley and Rock, abstract art and the Guggenheim Museum, the golden age of sports (DiMaggio, Unitas, B. Russell, P. Gonzales, and B. Hogan).   The book ends with a chronology which provides an overview by decade, source notes by chapter, further reading, and an index.  The readable text is relieved only by twenty-six  black and white photos or the first page of each chapter with white writing on a black background.  There is lots of “meat” in this book for reports so it isn’t just a photo-essay like some other series.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist



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973.922-23 U.S. HISTORY -- 1960s

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973.924-26 U.S. HISTORY -- 1970s

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973.927-28 U.S. HISTORY -- 1980s

Santella, Andrew.  JAMES EARL CARTER JR.  Profiles of the Presidents.     
    Minneapolis:  Compass Point, 2003.  64p.  0-7565-0283-7; lib.bdg., $23.90  
    2002-003031    Gr.  3-6         973.926   or   92

    This biography of a 20th century president begins will his unknown status and attributes Carter’s election to his many speeches and handshaking, confidence, hard work, and Nixon’s resignation and voter loss of faith in politicians.   The biography returns to his childhood, grade school, high school, and appointment to the U. S. Naval Academy.  Because of World War II, Carter’s class graduated in three years and he chose to work on submarines.  Carter left his new wife behind when he left for war.  Carter was in the navy for eight years until his father died and he came back to take over the family farm and business.  As a community leader, Carter took an unpopular stand on segregation.  Some offices he held were school board, Georgia state senate, and governor.  To prepare for the presidency, Carter became chairman of the Democratic National Campaign Committee.  His campaign theme was “A leader, for a change.”  Carter defeated Ford in a close election and appointed many African-Americans to important positions.  He pardoned draft evaders during the Vietnam War which allowed people who left the country to return to the U.S., worked on human rights around the world, prepared a treaty to return the Panama Canal to Panama, improved relations with China, brokered a peace treaty in the Middle East between Sadat and Begin, worked on an energy plan, and worked on an arms treaty with the Soviet Union that never became a treaty because the Soviets invaded Afghanistan.  The role of the hostages taken in Iran and Carter’s refusal to return the ill Shah to Iran, Ted Kennedy’s candidacy, and Reagan’s popularity lost him the 1980 election.  However, Carter continued to work to free the hostages and they were freed on Reagan’s first day in office.
    Space is devoted to Carter’s service to the country and the world after leaving office: The Carter Presidential Center of Emory University in Atlanta to promote democracy, human rights, and health care throughout the world; supervising world elections; building houses for Habitat for Humanity; and publishing books.  The book ends with a photo of Jimmy and Rosalyn receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom.  The glossary includes words highlighted in the text.  At the end of the book there are statistics of his personal and public life as well as selected books written by him, a list of cabinet members, a time line of his life in one column and world events in another, and election results. A list of five book, five web sites, and three addresses of historic sites are given.  A list of U.S. presidents with years in office and an index conclude the book. 
    There is a color or black and white photo on almost every page and the text is large enough and the vocabulary is easy enough for fast reading.  This biography is recommended for school and public libraries.  
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience of as a school library media specialist


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973.928-29 U.S. HISTORY -- 1990s

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973.930-31 U.S. HISTORY -- 2000s

Andryszewski, Tricia.  TERRORISM IN AMERICA.  Headliners series. 
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook/Copperbeach, 2002.  64p.  0-7613-2803-3; lib.bdg.,
    $25.90     3001-007801      Gr. 3-9        363.3

    The prologue contains several pages devoted to September 11, 2001 and the planes that plowed into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.  The first chapter, “Terrorism in America’s Past,” discusses the KKK; civil rights advocates, the Black Panthers and Weather Underground; and Puerto Rican independence supporters, the FALN.  The chapter on “Foreign Terrorists Target Americans” includes the Iran Hostage Crisis of the 1970s, the state -sponsored terrorism in the Middle East, the bombing of Lockerbie and a Berlin nightclub by Libyan groups, and activities of Qaddafi, Arafat, and Hussein.  “Terror Comes to America” includes the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center, and the trial of the conspirators.  “Homegrown Terrorism” includes a group of KKK, white survivalists, and neo-Nazis that formed “The Order.”  Other groups include environmental and animal rights groups like Earth First! And Animal Liberation Front, the Unabomber, the militia movement, Ruby Ridge, The “Leaderless Resistance” Federal gun-control legislation, McVeigh and the Oklahoma City federal building bombing, antiabortion violence, and the 1997 Atlanta Olympic bombing.  “New Attacks on Americans Abroad” includes Osama bin Laden and six acts of terrorism including a number of truck bombings and the U.S.S. Cole in Yemen.  Large sections are devoted to bin Laden and al-Quaeda.  “After September 11” there is information about NATO support, the role of Pakistan, bombing of Afghanistan, and the anthrax attacks.  “Fighting Terrorism in America” discusses the dangers of counter terrorism encouraging more terrorism and the loss of civil liberties in fighting terrorism, the Homeland Security cabinet position, highlights of the new law giving the government more powers to investigate and fight terrorism, the possibility of national identification cards, and other changes in America.  The U.S. policy of not opposing restrictions on the widespread sale of weapons and American businesses who sell them and opposing a permanent international criminal court to try suspects are discussed.  This is a well-rounded book  that discusses all angles of terrorism and does not exempt activities by Americans. The chronology begins in 1979 and ends Oct. 7, 200l so the book does not include information about possible U.S. attacks on Iraq  and Saddam Hussein.  Libraries owning  Lalley’s 9.11.01: TERRORISTS ATTACK THE U.S. should also purchase this title because the focus is different.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist

Lalley, Patrick.  9.11.01: TERRORISTS ATTACK THE U.S.  Austin, TX: Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 2002.  
    48p.  0-7398-6021-6; lib.bdg., $31.40    Gr. 4-9+  364.1    or    973.930-31
       
    This book is so new that it is painful to read about the events that shocked the world at what is known as “ground zero” and the Pentagon.  The first two chapters explain the events of the day.  The third chapter gives a history of the World Trade Center.  The next chapter tells about Islam in the United States and differentiates between them and Islamic extremists. Information behind the attacks and about Bin Laden are included.  The next chapter includes stories from Ground Zero. The final chapter is about the impact of terrorism and about the war on Afghanistan.  A double-page map of the world locates the countries that lost citizens at the World Trade Center as well as provides a list. A glossary of a dozen terms that appeared in bold print in the text, a list of three web sites and five books, and an index conclude the book.  This straight-forward chronicle of events on September 11 is enhanced with maps and clear color photos. Purchase for school and public libraries. 
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist


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973.932 U.S. HISTORY -- 2010s

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979.4 U.S. HISTORY -- 2010s

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