Autumn -- Thanksgiving

FICTION / NONFICTION

Bourgeois, Paulette and Brenda Clark.  FRANKLIN’S HOLIDAY TREASURY.  Illus. by
    Brenda Clark, Shannon Jennings, Muriel Wood, and Shelley Southern.   Tonawanda, NY:
    Kids Can, 2002.  128p. 1-55337-045-7 hb. $15.95.  C2001-902831-8    PreS-Gr.3     E

    This volume includes four individual holiday picture books.  The titles are FRANKLIN’S HALLOWEEN (1996), FRANKLIN’S VALENTINES (1998), FRANKLIN’S CHRISTMAS GIFT (1998), and FRANKLIN’S THANKSGIVING, (2001).   The four picture books are presented in their entirety including text and illustrations.  Except for slightly brighter illustrations in the originals, this book contains the same text and illustrations in the picture books.  The price for this collection makes this a bargain that will be appreciated by fans who enjoy viewing Franklin on TV.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Holub, Joan.  TURKEYS NEVER GOBBLE!  Illus by Jennifer Beck Harris.  New York:
    HarperFestival, 2002.  22p.  0-06-008091-4; bd.bk., $5.99   PreS-Gr. 2  BB

    The animals who gather together for Thanksgiving dinner have their best manners with them and all goes well until Moose spills soup on Tiger’s tail and a food fight ensures.  This is a humorous board book that will be popular at Thanksgiving time and throughout the year.  The animals are alligators, moose, hippos, monkeys, tigers, foxes, rhinos, porcupines, yaks, warthogs, turkeys, and grizzly bears.  Because the animals always say “thank you” and “please,” this book could be used by teachers to discuss what constitutes good manners.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Jackson, Garnet.  THE FIRST THANKSGIVING.  Hello Reader series, Level 3.
    Illus by Carolyn Croll.  New York: Scholastic/Cartwheel, 2000.  38p. 0-439-20628-6;
    pb., $3.99    00-035816   Gr. 1-2    ER

    This is a straight-forward account of the Pilgrims from the sea voyage to the first Thanksgiving.  Although the illustrations are undistinguished, they are adequate.  Emerging readers will find information about Samoset, Squanto, Massasoit, and Bradford.  Although there are lots of picture books on this topic, this easy reader, especially in paperback, will be useful for reading practice during November.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Lee, Quinlan B.  TRICKY TURKEY TONGUE TWISTERS.  Illus by Clive Scruton.
    New York:  HarperFestival, 2002.  16p.  0-694-01682-9; bd. Bk., $6.99
    2001-092500   Gr. K-3   BB

    Stiffer than regular paper and not as stiff as a board book, each page of this book opens up to a trifold.  All sentences are alliterative and describe a Thanksgiving dinner from “A grateful group greets gathering guests” to naps for adults who are “Stuffed sleepers snooze snoring.” The illustration for “Nodding nappers notice nothing naughty.  Nevertheless,” shows a girl holding a balloon and a pin over the sleeping children and adults.  The illustrations show people of all ages, sexes, and several ethnic groups but are not particularly engaging.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Levine, Abby.  THIS IS THE TURKEY.  Illus by Paige Billin-Grye.  Morton Grove, IL:
    Whitman, 2000.  0-8075-7888-6; lib.bdg., $14.95   00-008175  PreS-Gr. 2  E

    This Thanksgiving story, told in the cadence of  “The House That Jack Built,” begins “This is a turkey to shout about!  And Max is the one who picked it out.  This is the pan where it roasts away/ for the guests who are coming Thanksgiving Day.”  Readers are introduced to a family where Dad stirs the cranberries, an uncle brings salad greens, and an aunt provides her famous beans.  Cousins as well as neighbors come to dinner.  In the middle of this happy gathering, the turkey shoots off the platter into the aquarium but Grandma tells Max not to worry “…we have all we need because everyone’s here.” The watercolor, pencil, and ink illustrations depict an ordinary family with humor during a holiday dinner.  This satisfying holiday story is highly recommended for school, public, day care, and home libraries.  Read this one aloud!
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

McCourt, Lisa.  THE MOST THANKFUL THING.  Illus. by Cyd Moore.  New York:
          Scholastic, 2004.  ISBN: 0439650836 hb.   PreS - Gr. 3     E PIC

          A mother and daughter look through a photo album and talk about some of the special events in the mother's life.  Every memory seems more wonderful than the last, and the little girl thinks each time that surely they have come to the best one.   She eventually  finds out that, even though her mother is grateful for her special times, her "most thankful thing" is her little girl.  This is an enjoyable book for parents and children to read together, and it may lead to more sharing of stories.  The typical black of photo album pages is used to great advantage to set off the whimsical and colorful illustrations.  
          Kathryn Geier, Retired librarian & Friend of the Ishpeming Carnegie Public Library

Melmed, Laura Krauss.  THIS FIRST THANKSGIVING DAY:  A COUNTING STORY.
    Illus by Mark Buehner.  New York: Harper, 2001.  24p.   0-688-14554-X; hb., $15.95
    0-688-14555-8; lib.bdg., $15.89    94-14215     PreS-Gr. 2       E   or   811.54

    This book serves as a holiday and a counting book.  There is a short poem for each numeral up to a dozen.  Pilgrim and Native American children are shown working on double page spreads that alternate between numbers and the two groups of children.  The illustrations are “saccharine sweet.”  The last double page spread, for the number 12, shows the "Wampanoag and Pilgrim friends/together will break bread."  This is a very idealistic view of the First Thanksgiving Day.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Roberts, Bethany.  THANKSGIVING MICE!  Illus by Doug Cushman.  New York:
    Clarion, 2001.  32p.  0-618-12040-8; hb., $13.00   00-047456   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    The watercolor illustrations are framed on each page and the text on the double pages forms a couplet.  The rhymes help beginning readers in their independent reading.  The mice are preparing for a Thanksgiving play.  Costumes, sets, lines, curtains, and props are shown in the illustrations.  Other animals come to the play.  Act 1 begins with "Pilgrim mice sailed on a ship."  The charming mice land on Plymouth Rock, friendly folk give them some seeds, the harvest is bountiful so they invite their friends to share in a feast.  The animal audience applauds the play and so will young readers.  The essence of sharing, the keystone of Thanksgiving Day, is shown in a charming age appropriate manner.  This story can also inspire and provide practical ideas to youngsters who want to perform their own Thanksgiving play.  Read this aloud at preschools, public library story hours, and early primary students in schools.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

 Rosen, Michael.  THANKSGIVING WISH.   Illus. by John Thompson.
    New York:  Blue Sky/Scholastic,1999.  32p.    0-590-25563-0; hb., $16.95.
    97-42208   Gr. K-5+     E    or    FIC     PAULIN'S PICKS

    Amanda's family always spent Thanksgiving with her cousins at her Grandmother Bubbe's house and Grandmother spent the whole month preparing that meal.  She even made the dressing from her own braided challah and the gelatin molds had ten different layers.  But Amanda's favorite part was pulling on the wishbones with her grandmother who had saved them all year for her grandchildren.  The first Thanksgiving without grandmother was held at Amanda's "new" old house.  When the cousins and their families came, the meal was not finished but everyone pitched in until the overload on all the appliances blew fuses.  Mrs. Yee, a neighbor came over and offered her kitchen and the kitchen of another neighbor who was out of town.  When the meal was over, Amanda cried because she missed her grandmother and her collection of wishbones.  Because she was the youngest cousin, the family decided that she and Mrs. Yee, who was also a grandmother, should pull that day's wishbone.  Amanda finally learned what her grandmother wished for every year.  This heartwarming story could be read aloud after a family Thanksgiving meal, at a public library story hour, or in a classroom.  Highly recommended for libraries of all types.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library media specialist

 Ruelle, Karen Gray.  THE THANKSGIVING BEAST FEAST. Illus by the author.
    Holiday House Reader Series, Level       2.  New York: Holiday, 1999.  32p.
    0-8234-1511-2; hb.,  $14.95.         98-51339         Gr.1-2         ER

     There are four chapters to this holiday easy reader.  In the first chapter two cat kids, Harry and Emily, talk about what they like to eat at thanksgiving time.  Emily prefers  pumpkin-shaped cookies to pumpkin pie, an opinion that surfaces throughout the book and influences the ending.  The two cats discuss how the American Indians helped the pilgrims grow corn and how they had a feast together because they were thankful.  In the second chapter they watch a squirrel, a bird, and a chipmunk look for, but not find food.   In chapter 3, Harry and Emily make plans for their beast feast.  In the last chapter, the cat family is getting ready for their Thanksgiving relatives.  But Harry and Emily take time to put out food so the animals can have Thanksgiving too.  They even share Emily's pumpkin-shaped cookies with them for dessert.   This is a satisfying story for emerging readers.  It even works as a read aloud, teachers may want to read it aloud and then pass out pumpkin-shaped cookies before  putting the book in the back of the room for students to read individually.  Teachers may choose to read only the first three chapters aloud and let children finish the book on their own.   Although easy readers are not the read aloud choice for public library story hours, this one would work before the children frost pumpkin-shaped cookies as a culminating activity.  The cat children are as appealing as the story.  Librarians may decide to put this one in with the easy readers rather than with the holiday books. Wherever they put it, it belongs in the collection.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

Rylant, Cynthia.  IN NOVEMBER.  Illus. by Jill Kastner.  San Diego:  Harcourt,
    2000.  32p.  0-15-201076-9; hb., $16.00.  98-22276    PreS-Gr.3   E

    This is a perfect marriage of illustrations and text to create a perfect picture book.  The poetic text begins “In November, the earth is growing quiet” and goes on to explain how nature is shutting down for the winter.  Rylant addresses birds, plants, trees, and farm animals.  Fall food including the Thanksgiving, not mentioned by name, is discussed in the context of a family meal.  The book concludes with “In November, at winter’s gate, the stars are brittle...and the world has tucked her children in, with a kiss on their heads, till spring.”
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Scheer, Julian.  A THANKSGIVING TURKEY.  Illus by Ronald Himler.  New York:
    Holiday, 2001.  32p.  0-8234-1674-7; hb., $16.95.  00-1016644   Gr. K-3  E   or  FIC

    In this first person narrative, a boy and his mother move to rural Virginia to live on Grandad's farm because he is “getting up in years."  The story takes place in the past but no years are given.  However, it has been a long time since a whole turkey could be purchased for $1.80.  The boy has chores but he and his Grandad take time for long walks where they appreciate nature and identify animal tracks.  Granddad tells stories about hunting turkeys using a turkey caller.  As Thanksgiving approaches, they decide to hunt for their holiday turkey.  The ending is no surprise as they decide to let the magnificent bird escape and purchase one instead.  However, the total effect is evocative of times past in a rural setting and the intergenerational relationship is handled with sensitivity.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library media specialist

Willey, Margaret, THANKSGIVING WITH ME.  Illus. by Lloyd Bloom.  New York:
    Geringer/HarperCollins, 1998.  unp.   0-06-0277113-2, hb., $14.95     95-43627
    PreS-Gr. 3     E

    A child questions her mother about the uncles who are coming to celebrate Thanksgiving with them in this rhyming picture book.  Because the uncles appear in a cart pulled by mules and mother cooks on an old iron cookstove, the book has an "old-time" flavor. The descriptions of the 6 brothers are succinct and provide good examples of description.  The child's dialogue is given in italics.  This clear delineation between the two characters makes is suitable  for antiphonal/call and response choral reading.  Willey's story provides a family slant to the Thanksgiving holiday season.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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NONFICTION

Anderson, Laurie Halse.  THANK YOU SARAH: THE WOMAN WHO SAVED
    THANKSGIVING.  Illus by Matt Faulkner, New York: Simon & Schuster, 2002.
    32p. 0689847874; hb., $16.95   Gr. 1-4   92    or    394.26

    Told in the first person by a narrator, readers learn that Thanksgiving might have been lost if it weren’t for Sarah Hale.  Rather than being a “Superhero” Hale is listed as a “dainty little lady” who was not to be underestimated.  Hale’s many accomplishments including “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” writing poetry, being the first female American magazine editor, and mother of five.  Hale wrote thousands of letters tfor 38 years to get Thanksgiving established as a National Holiday.  The book ends with “A Feast of Facts” a timeline, information of Civil War, a biography of Hale, and selected sources.  The text and illustrations tell the story with humor.  This picture book provides biographical and holiday information.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Erickson, Paul.  DAILY LIFE IN THE PILGRIM COLONY 1636.  New York:
    Clarion, 2002.  48p.  0-618-05846-X; hb., $20.00  0-395-98841-1; pb., $9.95
    2001-017203   Gr.  3-7+    974.4

    This beautiful history book shares a wealth of information about the pilgrims beginning with coming to the new world on the Mayflower.  A large color photo of the Mayflower II is representative of the sharp photos taken at Plimoth Plantation that appear throughout the book.  Clear explanations accompany color photos, maps, artifacts, drawings, engravings, and documents.  The sidebars appear on blue backgrounds so they stand out from the regular text.  All of the topics are featured in double-page spreads that have an interesting balance of photos and text, including the sidebars.  The book follows the daily life of the Prentiss family of Plymouth that includes 12-year-old Isaac, 7-year-old Isaac, 16-year-old Sarah, their parents and an apprentice.  Some topics are the colony and homesteads, cooking and eating, eating, work of men and women, trade and defense, government and religion, health and medicine, and their place in history.  The book concludes with a timeline, glossary, and index.  Elementary and middle schools as well as public libraries of all sizes should purchase this book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Jackson, Garnet.  THE FIRST THANKSGIVING.  Hello Reader series, Level 3.  Illus. by
    Carolyn Croll.  New York: Scholastic/Cartwheel, 2000.  38p. 0-439-20628-6; pb.,  $3.99
    00-035816      Gr. 1-2      ER

    This is a straight-forward account of the Pilgrims from the sea voyage to the first Thanksgiving.  Although the illustrations are undistinguished, they are adequate.  Emerging readers will find information about Samoset, Squanto, Massasoit, and Bradford.  Although there are lots of picture books on this topic, this easy reader, especially in paperback, will be useful for reading practice during November.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Gerver, Jane E.  GROW A PUMPKIN PIE.  My First Hello Reader series; level 1.
    Illus  by Rammy Speer-Lyon.  New York:  Scholastic Cartwheel, 2000.   32p.
    0-439- 20056-3; pb., $4.95    99-087748    PreS-Gr. 1   635.62   or   ER

    Learn how to make a pumpkin pie from planting to seed to eating the pie and saving seeds for next year in this easy reader.  There are stiff cards in the middle that  have perforated edges so readers can match a picture with the word.  Five other activities and answers are included.  The rhymes in this book are natural and easy to read.  Use in the fall for Halloween or Thanksgiving.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Gibbons, Gail.  THE PUMPKIN BOOK.  Illus by the author.  New York: Holiday,
     1999.  unp. 0-8234-1465-5, lib. bdg, . $16.95   98-45267  PreS-Gr.4+  635.62

     Gibbons begins by showing the different varieties of pumpkins available, what is necessary to grow them, planting by drill behind a tractor or in a hill by hand.  Readers learn about the about flower and how vines dry up when they are ripe. Other interesting tidbits include details about the largest pumpkin grown, pumpkin involvement in Thanksgiving and  Halloween, how to carve or decorate pumpkins, how to dry pumpkin seeds.  There is information about Native Americans and pumpkins that can be used with studies of several  tribes.  Gibbons' book will be popular all year but especially in October and November.
     Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center
     32 years as a school library media specialist

Jackson, Garnet.  THE FIRST THANKSGIVING.  Hello Reader series, Level 3. 
    Illus by Carolyn Croll.  New York: Scholastic/Cartwheel, 2000.  38p. 0-439-20628-6 pb.,
    $3.99  00-035816   Gr. 1-2    ER

    This is a straight-forward account of the Pilgrims from the sea voyage to the first Thanksgiving.  Although the illustrations are undistinguished, they are adequate.  Emerging readers will find information about Samoset, Squanto, Massasoit, and Bradford.  Although there are lots of picture books on this topic, this easy reader, especially in paperback, will be useful for reading practice during November.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

 
Markham, Lois. HARVEST.  Illus with photos.  World Celebrations and Ceremonies Series.
    Woodbridge, CT: Blackbirch, 1999. 24p.   1-56711-275-7, lib. bdg. $14.95.  98-15096
    Gr.3-8    394.26

     During November, teachers, librarians, scout leaders, and parents can spin a globe and have children point out places around the world where harvest festivals are  held.  If a globe is not available, Markham includes two maps, a close-up and a world view for each of the 10 countries:  Brazil, wine, corn, green beans; China, harvest;  England, grain ; India, rice; Israel, harvest; Mexico, Huichol Squash Ceremony; Nigeria Igbo Yam Festival; Puerto Rico, coffee; Russia, wheat; and the U.S., national harvest festival. There is diversity and longevity in the festivals.  China's Mid-Autumn Festival, which honors the full moon, has been celebrated for 2,000 years and Sukkot is celebrated by Jews all over the world,  especially in Israel. Not all festivals are held in the fall, Pongal , India's celebration of the rice harvest, takes place in January and a Nigerian Fishing Festival is held in March.  Activities, food, costumes, and history are part of the information given. Phonetic spellings of unfamiliar terms are helpfully integrated into the text.  A glossary, index, further reading, and tourism web sites are included.  HARVEST gives  a multicultural twist to Thanksgiving and deserves a place in school and public library collections.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
     32 years experience as a school library/media specialist

Murphy, Patricia J.  OUR NATIONAL HOLIDAYS.  Let's See series.  Minneapolis:
    Compass Point, 2001.  24p.  0-7565-0194-6; lib.bdg., $18.60   2001-004484
    Gr. 1-2    394.26

    After an explanation of a national holiday, including our first one, Independence Day; six other holidays are explained with a photo on one page and an explanation on the other.  The holidays, in order by month, are:  Martin Luther King , Jr. Day; Presidents' Day; Memorial Day; Columbus Day; Veterans Day; and Thanksgiving.  There is a glossary of five terms, three points in the "Did You Know?" section, and a bibliography section called "Want to Know More?" that includes three books, two web sites, and addresses for Plimoth Plantation and Independence National Historical Park.  An index concludes the book.  Because many businesses are closed on Christmas and there is no mail delivery, it could be considered a national holiday.  However, the definition, "On national holidays, Americans celebrate their history" excludes religious holidays. This is an easy-to-read book about our historical holidays.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Roberts, Bethany.  THANKSGIVING MICE!  Illus by Doug Cushman.  New York:
    Clarion, 2001.  32p.  0-618-12040-8; hb., $13.00  00-047456   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    The watercolor illustrations on are framed on each page but the text on the double pages forms a couplet.  The rhymes help beginning readers in their independent reading.  The mice are preparing for a Thanksgiving play.  Costumes, sets, lines, curtains, and props are shown in the illustrations.  Other animals come to the play.  Act 1 begins with "Pilgrim mice sailed on a ship."  The charming mice land on Plymouth Rock, friendly folk give them some seeds, the harvest is bountiful, so they invite their friends to share in a feast.  The animal audience applauds the play and so will young readers.  The essence of sharing, the keystone of Thanksgiving Day, is shown in a charming age appropriate manner.  This story can also inspire and provide practical ideas to youngsters who want to perform their own Thanksgiving play.  Read this aloud at preschools, public library story hours, and to early primary students in schools.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Roop, Peter and Connie Roop.  LET'S CELEBRATE THANKSGIVING.  Illus. by Gwen
    Connelly.  Brookfield, CT:    Millbrook, 1999.  unp.   0-7613-0973-X; lib.bdg., $19.90
    0-7613-0429-0; pb.,  $6.95  98-51380     PreS-Gr.-3     394.26

     Riddles on the end papers are an indication of more riddles inside.  This book is a combination of  "Fascinating Facts" and little essays like "Why did the Pilgrims celebrate Thanksgiving?" "Why do we eat turkey and pumpkin pie on Thanksgiving?" and "Do other people celebrate Thanksgiving?"   Directions for making a paper bag turkey round off the book.  Put this book on the shelves beside LET'S CELEBRATE HALLOWEEN and  LET'S CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS but expect them to stay there only during the off-season.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist.

Stamper, Judith Bauer.  FIVE HAUNTED HOUSES.  My First Hello Reader series, Level 4. 
    Illus by Tim Raglin.  New York: Scholastic Cartwheel, 2000.  48p.  0-439-20546-8 pb. $3.99.   
    00-026572    Gr. 2-3    E     PAULIN’S PICKS

    These five separate stories about haunted houses are exciting for primary readers.  In the first story Jake does not believe in ghosts or that the old house on the hill is haunted.  Because of the illustrations, readers will enjoy the joke that the girl Jake talks to inside the house is really a ghost.  In the second story, Lisa is warned not to take the socks off a marble statue in the old house owned by her aunt and uncle.  The third story is a counting rhyme that goes up to five.  Luis’s new home is haunted and he convinces his parents they can’t live there.  In the last story stops at his friend Ben’s house so they can go trick-or-treating. The endings to the last two stories are priceless.   This is an exception holiday and easy reader.  Shelve with or easy readers rather than Halloween books because scary book are popular all year.    “a Terrible Fright!” is good for group unison choral reading.  Divide the group into five units.  Use to teach ordinal numbers, first through fifth.  Each group can say the two lines in unison.  Make posters for the following sight words that serve as clues:  first/house, second/mouse, third/wall, fourth/hall, fifth/floor. Hold up the word to signal the group to speak.  The leader can say the first two lines and the last two lines or all five groups can say the last two lines together.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

 
Waters, Kate.  GIVING THANKS: THE 1621 HARVEST FEAST.  Photos by Russ
    Kendall.  New York: Scholastic, 2001.  40p.  0-439-24395-5; hb., $16.95.
    00-050477     K-Gr. 4+    394.26   PAULIN’S PICKS

    In the preface Waters tells readers that sometime between September 21 and November 9, 1621, the Pilgrims and the Wamangoag shared a harvest celebration.  At the end of the book in a section called “More about the 1621 Harvest Feast,” Waters dispels the myth of the first Thanksgiving and says that it did not happen the way we were led to believe.  Rather it was a coincidence that the Wamangoag visited the Pilgrims when they were celebrating their harvest.  The photos are clear, crisp, and realistic.  The photos were taken at a three-day event that took place on October 7-9, 2000.  The first person story is related alternately by two boys.  Dancing Moccasin was played by a Mashpee Wampanoag from Cape Cod and Graham Lelbica, whose mother works at works at Plimoth Plantation,  played Resolved White who was a real boy in 1621.   There is a bibliography of three books, information and web site for Plimoth Plantation, and a combined glossary/index.  This is an essential purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist


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