Dewey Guide: 600s

Subjects Listed in This Directory


 600 TECHNOLOGY

Bradley, Kimberly Brubaker. POP!  A BOOK ABOUT BUBBLES.  Photos by Margaret Miller.  
    New York: HarperCollins, 2001. 40p.   0-06-028700-4; hb., $15.95   Gr. K-3     530.4  

    Have you ever wondered why bubbles are always round. . .or why they pop. . .or why bubbles in other liquids such as water, juice or milk act differently?   Then join the crowd!  Bradley does an excellent job, without going too far in depth, of discussing the subject in an interesting and entertaining manner.  The simple text and accompanying vivid photographs make it a most inviting read as well as a springboard for experiments and discussion.  Children will no doubt want to test the recipe for making a bubble solution at the end of the book and will bubble over with enthusiasm without realizing that science can be fun.
    Patricia J. Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Dash, Joan.  THE LONGITUDE PRIZE.  Illus by Dusan Petricic.  New York:  Foster/
    Farrar, 2000.  200p.  0-374-34636-4;l hb., $16.00  97-044257  Gr. 6-12   681.2

    In the eighteenth century it was easy to chart a ship’s latitude, North/South positions) but there was no method of calculating longitude.  Britain’s Parliament offered a prize of 20,000 pounds and the substantial prize remained untouched for 50 years.  This is about a village carpenter, John Harrison, and his travails in getting his invention accepted.
    There were several reasons why the Board of Longitude was not interested in Harrison’s clock: the Royal Astronomer preferred lunar reckoning and a celestial clock, the idea was unconventional, and Parliament changed the rules for the prize in 1765.  Also Harrison was not of noble birth, had little personal funds, was a stubborn man, found it difficult to articulate his findings, and was not on cordial terms with the Astronomer Royal or members of the royal Academy.  Politics was alive and well in the 18th century.
    Harrison’s clock had a set of oscillating bars controlled by coiled springs instead of a pendulum and was counterbalanced so it could survive the ship’s motions.  After a trial on the HMS Orford, the ship’s master made out a certificate describing how, for the first time, a professional navigator acknowledged that a machine could outdo his personal reckoning.  But since this was sponsored by the Royal Society instead of the Board of Longitude and since little changes in longitude operated to test the clock’s ability, it was not accepted  Besides learning about Harrison and his invention, other interesting facts emerge.
    Readers learn about the Nautical Almanac, first published in 1767 which was first time that the meridian of Greenwich was used to calculate longitude.  One of the most interesting facts to come out in the book is information about Captain Cook’s voyages to the South Pacific and his involvement with the trials of the clock or watch.  Similarities between Cook and Harrison’s station in life are interesting.   Pierre Curie and Ben Franklin also have cameos in the book:
    Eventually Harrison was offered the prize if the money was divided into two parts, the first half after delivering, under oath, the drawings from which the silver swatch was made along with a written explanation of those drawings.  Harrison did not want to take the watch apart under the eyes of experts and answer questions.  The second half of the money would only be given if other at least two other timekeepers were made that worked as well as the watch.
    Harrison’s invention is one of machines that came to be called marine chronometers.  Navigation is safer because of Harrison.  Today, a high-precision pendulum clock (accurate to within three seconds a year) a quartz clock (accurate to a hundred to a thousand times greater than the pendulum clock) , and the atomic clock (less that one second in 100,000 years) are cousins of Harrison’s silver watch.  However, Harrison would not recognize the GPS, the Global Positioning System, today’s longitude tool used to guide troops through missiles and satellites out in space.  The GPS give off pulsed radio signals which computers calculate as latitude and longitude.  Harrison’s contribution was major but it will take a special reader to read the book cover to cover.  Others will use the index to glean information for reports.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    Editor's Note:  This title is an Honor Book for the Sibert Informational Book Award 

Harper, Charise Mericle. IMAGINATIVE INVENTIONS. Illus by author.  Boston:
    Little, Brown, 2001. 32 p. 0-316-34725-6; hb., $14.95  00-062443   Gr.1-4   609

    Maybe not one-hundred percent authentic, but the creative tales are definitely entertaining and are based on research.  Did you know that high-heeled shoes, which came on the scene in France in the 16th century, were inspired by a tall tale about a short king?  Eye glasses came about when Italian, Silvano Armat, had difficulty seeing and finding things, but upon drinking from a glass when it was empty, he looked through the bottom and realized that it magnified what he was looking at.  Each of the fourteen inventions is related on a two-page busy spread that includes some of the most cherished items in a child's life: roller skates, chewing gum, marbles, potato chips, etc.  The author answers questions and reveals fascinating stories behind the inventions through four-line stanzas as well as in the borders around the lively illustrations.  Three of the borders are mini-collages depicting the subject of the verse while the fourth border contains facts of who, what, why, when and where.  Irresistible from cover to cover!   Harper does a great job of inviting younger readers to see inside the minds of great inventors and hopefully turn them on to searching out their own creativity.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library

Rubin, Susan Goldma.  TOILETS, TOASTERS AND TELEPHONES.  San Diego:
    Harcourt, 1998. 132p.  0-15-201421-7;hb. $20.00    Gr. 3-9+    683.8 or 621

    Have you ever wondered when the first carpet sweeper was invented? (1858).  Are you surprised that the first modern indoor toilet with a wooden seat was built around 2000 B.C. in a place in Crete?  Are you aware that the first refrigerator for food was a wooden box invented by a Maryland farmer to carry milk and butter to market?  This book is every bit as unique as its title.  It is a fascinating history of everyday objects, but filled with entertaining anecdotes and remarkable facts.  The book includes more than thirty vintage photographs and many mellow old illustrations by Warnick.  Rubin has created a novelty that is defiantly user-friendly and is sure to emit the glow of a red light for anyone browsing the shelves.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Sandler, Martin W.  INVENTORS.  Illus. with photos.  New York:  HarperCollins, 1996.
    93p.   0-06-024924-2; hb. $21.95.  0-06-446746-5; pb. $10.95.    Gr. 5+    609.2

     Nothing is impossible if you put your mind to it. This may not be a quotation from a famous statesman, but it makes sense if you put yourself in the shoes of one of the many inventors written about in this book authored by Sandler.  Great inventors in history came up with ground-breaking discoveries that changed life as we know it---things we take for granted; electric lights, the Ferris wheel, the telephone, television, computer, to name a few.  Sandler's work presents the evolution of some of our country's greatest inventions and how they helped our country grow and develop and lead to even more inventions. Included are over one hundred photographs and illustrations from the Library of Congress that reveal the ingenuity of these great mental giants, who by using their spirit and imagination brought these inventions to reality. "Invention breeds invention" (that quotation did come from a famous individual...Ralph Waldo Emerson).
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

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610 MEDICINE

Dargie, Richard.  ANCIENT GREECE HEALTH AND DISEASE. Illus. by Adam Hook. Minneapolis, MN:
          Compass Point Books, 2006.  32p. ISBN: 9780756520878 lib.bg  $27.93.   Gr. 5-8     j 610.938.

          This book begins with an introduction explaining where Greece is and who the Greeks were.  Twelve chapters describe the 
understanding of disease and treatments, including pregnancy and birth, epidemics, and mental illness.  Accentuating the text 
throughout the book are maps, photographs of artifacts and illustrations.  This layout gives the book an ancient feel and authenticity 
to the text.  All of the chapters  are described on a two-page spread with quoted material in boxes.  Difficult words are explained 
in text boxes and also in the glossary.  This book is an excellent resource for the middle school audience in the study of ancient Greece. 
          Denise Engel, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Jennings, Gael. BLOODY MOMENTS; AND FURTHER HIGHLIGHTS FROM
    THE ASTOUNDING HISTORY OF MEDICINE. Illus. by Roland Harvey.
    New York/Toronto: Annick, 2000. 70p. 1-55037-643-8; hb. $16.95   Gr. 4-8   610.9

    Jennings really stepped out of the box on this one.  Call it yucky.  Call it gross.  Call disturbing.  But definitely call it humorous and educational. The illustrations will leave an indelible mark on your memory mode while learning a treasure trove of facts.  This somewhat crude history of medicine begins when Mabel is home sick.  She is bored out of her skull until a slimy envelope falls through the mail slot entitled, "The Guts Of Human Life".  Included in the package is a mysterious CD-ROM.  When Mabel inserts it into the computer, she is instantly drawn into the past and into exotic, but true, experiences in the history of medicine. With the turn of each page, medical history progresses providing a healthy dose of medical highlights from it's beginning, to the present, and far into the future. A great learning tool--if your stomach allows!
    Pat Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
 

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612 HUMAN BODY

DeGezelle, Terri.  YOUR BONES.  Minnetonka, MN:  Brigdestone/Capstone, 2002. 24p.  
    Bridgestone  Science Library   0-7368-1146-X lib.bdg.    $18.60     Gr. K-3     612.7

    As usual, Capstone Press does an excellent job of ensuring the accuracy of the information presented by the use of experts in the field as consultants, in this case a pediatrician and Professor of Pediatrics.  The author has presented just enough information for young children to absorb without seeming to talk down to them.  Each of the nine areas about bones is covered in a double-page spread that includes an illustration, related information, a fun fact and the definition of one of the terms used.   Although information is presented simply, items included in “Fun Facts” and instructions on "How to Build a Model Spine" might appeal to older students.  This would also make a wonderful class project.  The book concludes with a glossary, bibliography, list of Internet sites, and index.  Illustrations are colored photos and drawings.  The "Your Body" series also includes YOUR BRAIN, YOUR HEART, YOUR MUSCLES, YOUR LUNGS, and YOUR STOMAC.   This would be an excellent series to introduce very young gifted students to their bodies and bodily functions.
    Carolyn Anderson, L'Anse; retired elementary teacher,  L’Anse School and Public Library Advisory Board member

Flanagan, Alice.  CHOOSING EYEGLASSES WITH MRS. KOUTRIS.  Photos by
    Romie Flanagan.  Our Neighborhood Series.  Chicago:  Children's Press, 1998.  32p. 
    0-516-20775-X; lib. bdg., $19.00   0-516-26294-7; pb., $6.95  Gr. K-3    E  or  617.7

    First graders who are studying community helpers will find the vocabulary easy to understand when this appealing picture book is  read to them.  Second and third graders can read the book themselves.  The book shows Mrs. Koutris in a variety of activities in her job as an optician.  Wayne Garrow, a local dispensing optician, said the book is an accurate portrayal of his profession.  He said his job is also known as an eye glass fitter which would have been easy enough vocabulary for primary students.  Although no mention of education is mentioned, Wayne says that education varies from intensive courses of 6 weeks to two year college courses.   The color photos cover most of the page and the print is large for young readers.  The Flannagans have created a useful and attractive book for primary graders about a profession.  Primary schools and public libraries with career collections, will wish to purchase this one.
    Guest Reviewer: Wayne Garrow, Dispensing Optician, Eye Associates of Marquette, 30 years of experience as an optician.

Jones, Christianne.  YOUR SKIN WEIGHS MORE THAN YOUR BRAIN -  AND OTHER 
          FREAKY FACTS.  Illus. by Barbara Skeens.  Minneapolis, MN:  Picture Window Books,
          2008.  40p. hb. $13.99  ISBN:978-1-4048-3751-5  Gr. 2-5    j 612

          An interesting and intriguing books of facts about the human body.  Easy to read sentences and comic style illustrations 
make this a fun books to read.  Children will find the facts to be quite comical and interesting facts for research projects.  
A glossary of terms and index will make this a nice addition for school reference collection on the human body.
          Gina Sorensen, Media Specialist, Negaunee Public Schools

Lindeen, Carol K.  MY BONES.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2007.  24 p.
          ISBN: 978-0-7368-6696-5 hb. $15.93.    Gr. PreK-w   Easy Readers.   j611.71.

          My BONES, part of the "My Body" series by Capsone Press, presents the human skeleton and the function of bones in the
body.  The simple text on one page is complimented by an accompanying photograph or illustration on the opposing page.  This 
book is recommeded for early elementary and preschool students.  Some children may need assistance with some words and other 
parts of the book, including the Table of contents, glossary, index, Read More and Internet sites.  
          Denise Engel, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Parker, Steve.  THE BODY AND HOW IT WORKS.  Illus. with photos.  See and Explore Series.  New York: Dorling 
    Kindersley, 1998.  64p.   0-8368-2084-3; pb., $7.95  98-133912    Gr. 4-8    612

    This book is written using biological terms, while keeping the material readable with short sentences and paragraphs.  Directional lines connect the main text to corresponding illustrations.  Additional facts and drawings are framed off from the main text.  The book's large size allows students to study the detailed illustrations, some of which are enhanced with cartoons to grab the interest of young adolescents.  The author provides a complete glossary and index for easy reference.  Students and teachers will find this to be informative and interesting.  In addition, the paperback prices makes it a bargain for the classroom.  Recommended for classroom, school library media centers, and public libraries.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Parker, Steve.  THE BODY.  Illus. with photos.  Young Scientist Concepts and Projects Series.  Milwaukee:  
    Gareth Stevens, 1998.  68p.  0-8368-2084; 3; lib.bdg., $22.60   97-41627     Gr. 3-5     612

    This book proves to be an excellent resource on human body functions.  It provides complete coverage of body systems with detailed, colorful illustrations.  Each section includes easy-to-do activities which reinforce stated concepts of body operations.  Precise language is formatted into short sections for ease of reading.  Written text is supported by color photographs of children doing activities from the book.  It features a complete glossary of scientific terms and lists additional books, videos, and websites which act as references for further study.  This is a welcome addition to classrooms and school and public libraries.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Parker, Steve.  HUMAN BODY.  Illus. with photos.  Eyewitness Explorers Series.
    New York: Dorling Kindersley, 1998. 61p. 0-7894-2982-9 pb. $5.95    Gr. 1-3    612

    Characteristic of all books in the Eyewitness Explorers Series, this book has several detailed illustrations or color photographs on every page to supplement the text.  It also offers a complete table of contents and an index for easy reference.  Because this is a small book, with many interesting facts and pictures packed into each page, it does not work as a read-aloud book but is rather for individual use.  Because of the informative content and numerous pictures it would complement a classroom library.  This title is age appropriate, while successfully introducing technical biological vocabulary and is recommended for school and public libraries.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Platt, Richard. STEPHEN BIESTY'S INCREDIBLE BODY.  New York: Dorling
    Kindersley, 1998.  32p.   0-7894-3424-5; hb,  $19.95     Gr. 5-12     FIC

    This book is a visual adventure with 32 oversized pages of incredible drawings which integrate tiny color coded figures into body system teams that give the reader a sense of movement and directionality.  Colorful and finely detailed illustrations are layered in the cross section style that the illustrator is best known for.  There is so much information packed into each page that you are sure to learn something new about body systems and the individual organs within that make body parts less pronounced.  This book would serve well as a reading book rather than reference book because of the time it takes to study the drawings and read the small sections of text that are placed strategically to enhance the illustrations.  It is a delight to read.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Romanek, Trudee. ZZZ...!  THE MOST INTERESTING BOOK YOU’LL EVER READ
    ABOUT SLEEP.  Ill. by Rose Cowles.  Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can, 2002.  40p.
    1550749447; hb. $14.94   1550749463; pb. $6.95      Gr 3-8    612.8

    The quip on the front cover says it all.  "The most interesting book you'll ever read about sleep.”  Done with cartoon illustrations that will entertain, the text is concise, to-the-point, and filled with a variety and wealth of information about sleep. The text is done with a conversational tone, but it centers on the subject and will appeal to the young inquisitive mind.  There are sidebars that suggest experimental activities for the reader while the multi, pastel backgrounds of the pages add an interesting effect.  This title in the Mysterious You series has a lot of kid-appeal and is not apt to give reader the zzzzzzz's.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Silverstein, Alvin, Virginia Silverstein and Laura Silverstein Nunn.  SMELLING AND
    TASTING.  Senses and Sensors series.  Twenty-first century/Millwood, 2002.
    62p.    0-7613-1667-X; lib.bdg., $25.90   2001-18089   Gr. 5-8     612.8

    The authors emphasizes the importance of these "forgotten senses" (we rely more on vision, touch and hearing).  It includes a discussion on the artificial chemosensors that doctors are designing to diagnose disease.  It also mentions how a Breathalyzer works which should be of interest to young people.  The subject received comprehensive and scientifically accurate treatment that is neither boringly technical nor superficial.  "Did You Know?" boxes with highlighted text are found on the page margins   Other interesting correlated information is presented in colored boxes throughout.  Glossary words are in bold type.  Other features include further reading, Internet resources, and index.   Illustrations are color photos and drawings   Experiments are included making the series an excellent resource for science projects or class demonstrations.  The series includes HEARING and TOUCHING AND FEELING.  This is one of the best series on the senses that this reviewer has seen.
    Carolyn Anderson, L'Anse; retired elementary teacher,  L’Anse School and Public Library Advisory Board member

Sueling, Barbara.  YOU BLINK TWELVE TIMES A MINUTE: AND OTHER FREAKY FACTS
          ABOUT THE HUMAN BODY.  Illus. by Ryan Haugen.  Mankato, MN:  Picture Window
          Books, 2009.  40p.  ISBN: 978-1-4048-4116-1 hb. $17.95.  Gr. 3-5    j612

          Freaky facts are informative and entertaining, such as "men hiccup more than women." "The man who popularized jogging in America, 
James Fixx, died of a heart attack while running."  Each of the five chapters focuses on a different topic: your brain and facial features; life and 
death; strange ailments, hiccups and snoring; healings and dealings; and beliefs, customs and medical marvels. The pages are illustrated and 
entries are brief, mostly only a sentence in length.  A glossary and index are included.
          Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Swanson, Diane. BURP!  Illus by Rose Cowles. Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can Press, 2001.
    40p. 1-55074-599-9; hb., $14.95  1-55074-601-4; pb., $6.95  Gr. 3-8   612.3

    This unique title explores the mysteries of the human body utilizing a combination of enthralling information, entertaining anecdotes, and enlightening try-it activities.  If Burps can be appealing, this book will help kids discover a multitude of facts about food and eating.  The format is appealing and "cool" and will draw a reader into the text immediately.  After all, who could pass up finding out why your body has cravings?...what foods you should eat to power your brain?... or why a snake can swallow prey that is much fatter than itself???  An easy book to digest at any age!
    Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Tuxworth, Nicola.  A FIRST BOOK ABOUT GROWING.  Illus with photos.  Look and Learn Series.  
     Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 1999.  24p.  0-8368-2370-2lib.bdg. $ 18.60.    98-31778     PreS-K     E

     The photographs in this "First Book About..." are so realistic it causes one to wonder who these people really are?  Do I know them?  Or can I take that animal home with me?  Tuxtworth uses simple text along with the photos to depict the growth of young people, ducks, cats, horses and other living things.  Not only does she introduce young readers to the names of baby animals, but she provides a glossary as well as titles of additional books, videos and even web sites to investigate additional avenues of investigation of the subject of growing.
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

Van Cleave, Janice.  PLAY AND FIND OUT ABOUT THE HUMAN BODY.
      Illus by Michelle Nidehoff.  Play and Fiind Out Series.   New York:  Wiley,  1998.
     122p.   0-471-12935-6. $12.95   97-028716   PreS-Gr. 2

     This excellent science experiment guide is written for parents or teachers to use--but in language that would help very young children learn about "Why...?"  The book  includes areas that young children would have questions about, and experiments to help them understand.  Van Cleave gives tips for work area, time, supplies and materials needed.  Each section starts out with "I wonder why...? and is followed with a list of things you will need and step by step instructions for experiments, a "So Now We Know" statement and "More fun things to know and do."  I feel this is very age appropriate for activities for young children.  Information is at the level of the targeted students and seems accurate for their needs.  Safety precautions and adult supervision is recommended.  Van Cleave  lists all ingredients needed.  The book contains a table of contents, index, glossary and section summary.  The cover is helpful in identifying content; interesting  experiments for young children!  VanCleave is the author of more than 30 books.
     Maryalice Boone, Teacher, AuTrain-Onota Public School, Deerton,  MI 
 
Ziefert, Harriet. & Ehrlick, Fred M., MD.  You Can't take your Body to a Repair Shop.  
    Illus. by Amanda Haley.  New Jersey, Blue Apple Books, 2004.  33p.  
    ISBN: 1-59354-057-4  hb.  $15.95     Gr. 1-3     212

    This book is about what makes you sick,  and it can help children not be afraid when they get sick.  The humor and the neat illustrations will keep their attention..  Purchase for school and public libraries to help children learn about their bodies and how they work.  The book should help children know more about their bodies when they do get sick with minor diseases
    Sharon Evans, Assistant Librarian, Engadine, MI

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613.7 PHYSICAL FITNESS

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616 DISEASES

Monroe, Judy.  INFLUENZA AND OTHER VIRUSES .  Mankato, MN: LifeMatters,
    2002.  0-7368-1025-0; lib.bdg., $23.93   00-013233  Gr. 5-12   616.9

    This is a small book, less than an hundred pages, but it packs a large amount of information.  In its seven chapters, it succinctly covers such topics as the discovery and common traits of viruses, colds and flu, other types of viruses, treatment and prevention, and the state of current research.  Each chapter is preceded by an overview.  Spread among the chapter text are several marginal notes of different types; i.e., Fast facts, Did you Know, Myth vs.Fact, and others.  The author also presents information in sidebars in an anecdotal way by quoting teens of different ages regarding colds, flu, symptoms, treatment, and other related concerns.  The author includes a glossary, index, additional reading suggestions, addresses, and Internet sites for more information.
    While one can easily read this book cover to cover, the layout suggests a more shotgun approach to digging out information.  Given the many sidebars and marginal notes, the specificity of the chapters, and the compact presentation of facts without a lot of digression, one can select needed or pertinent information without wasted effort or time consuming reading.  This book may be intended for the middle school, but it has a place in the high school.  It represents a good source of factual information for all students, but is not intimidating for the less gifted student.  The language used is clear and simple and the only criticism I might make would be to include a pronunciation guide for some of the disease names either in the text or in an expanded glossary.  Besides, how many other books of this type have a recipe for chicken soup?
    Ted Snodgrass, Media Specialist; New Haven High School

Redman, Nina E.  FOOD SAFETY:  A REFERENCE HANDBOOK.
    Santa Barbara:  ABC-CLIO, 2000.  317p.  Contemporary World Issues series.
    1-57607-158-8; hb., $45.00    00-010427   Gr. 9-12+   363.19.

    This thorough investigation of food safety begins with a history and overview of food safety, a chronology of events (legislation and movements) from ancient to modern times, biographical sketches of eight scientists and activists,  facts and statistics about foodborne pathogenic microorganisms and natural toxins, listings of used and banned additives, an extensive directory of organizations, annotated bibliographies of print and nonprint resources, a glossary, and an index.   The section called "Bad Bug Book," contains the following information for each organism:  nature of the acute disease, diagnosis of human illness, associated foods, relative frequency of disease, complications, target population, foods analysis, selected outbreaks, education, and other resources for 24 micro-organisms and viruses like Salmonella, Escherichia Coli (E-Coli), and Hepatitis A.  Sue Scott, who teaches a high school commercial foods course, sees this book as a very organized and informative reference book for teenagers and adults but is disappointed with the lack of graphics and charts.
    GUEST REVIEWER:  Sue Scott, Negaunee High School, Neguanee, MI

Rotner, Shelley and Sheila Kelly.  THE A.D.D. BOOK FOR KIDS.  Photos by S. Rotner.  Brookfield, CT: 
    Millbrook, 2000.  32p.   0-7613-1722-8; lib.bdg. $22.90   99-46220 Gr. K-3     618.92

    This photographic essay uses bright colors for pages, background, and letters and contains photos of children on each page with a first person sentence.  Some questions appear and DeGabrielle wishes that more had been asked and that the pages were less distracting.  DeGabrielle  says that the age level is uncertain, it appears to be for young children but the vocabulary varies in difficulty.  DeGabrielle likes the section called "Notes for Parents and Teachers" at the beginning of the book which provides a definition and background information.  However, ongoing brain research could have been mentioned.  The term hyperactivity is included but visual hyperactivity lessens but still exists within the brain as a child grows older.  A six-book bibliography appears at the end of the book.  The book appears to be more valuable for parents than for children.  DeGabrielle does not recommend it for children without adult help.
     GUEST REVIEWER Linda DeGrabielle, Special Education teacher, Negaunee Public Schools, Negaunee, MI.   

Varner, Linnea Smith.  WEB FEET FOR HEALTH.  RockHill Communications, 14 Rock Road, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004  
    <www.webfeetguides.com>  Ring binder 132p. 1-890604-05   $95.00  Annual subscription to MARC or ONLINE 
    version formats $155.00 to single school subscribers and $250. for non subscribers.

    WEB FEET for Health is an Internet guide that includes high-quality web sites for grades 6-12 that have been evaluated by expert staff.  Five disclaimers are that the Internet is no replacement for a physician’s medical advice, and the importance of confidentiality, quality, organization standards, and common sense.  Sites were evaluated by experts listed in the credits for expertise and reputation of the source, accuracy, credibility, readability, bias, timeliness, integrity, and site navigation and design.   This guide is available in print, online, or in MARC records for library catalogs.
    The three ring binder notebook was the format that was evaluated by this reviewer.  There were 16 general health sites, and four health tools like MEDLINE.  There are 37 categories of topics from addiction, adolescent health, and allergies and asthma to fitness, gastrointestinal and genetic diseases, to senior health, skin conditions sleep disorders, and women’s health.  Each category has six to eight sites.  Small home pages are shown along with the name of the site and the URL along with a ten-line description of the site.
    Personal researching of this topic for four hours per week (after hours) for a school year to collect sites for disease projects for high school students yielded only a portion of these sites.   Purchase this treasure for middle school through university collections and public libraries of all sizes.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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621 MECHANICS-HEAT-LIGHT-MAGNETS

Auch, Alison.  COOL TOOLS.  Spyglass series.  Minneapolis: Compass Point, 2002.
    24p.  0-7565-0230-6; lib.bdg., $18.60  201-007321  Gr. 1-2   621.8

    The first topic addressed is “What is a machine?”  The rest of the book shows photos of a girl using simple machines: scissors, doorknob, toilet, can opener, clothespin, pliers, and a pizza cutter.  After a two page spread of “Fun Facts” about the objects, there is a glossary of five terms that were in bold type in the text, a list of three age appropriate books, and two web sites.  There is an index.  The photos of the girl using the machines are clear and the text is simple and easy to read and understand.  On the opposite page there is a photo of the object with parts labeled.  Teachers will love to have primary students read this book for themselves when they are studying simple machines and students will find it appealing and informative.  This is a first purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Bartholomew, Alan. ELECTRIC MISCHIEF. Ill. by Lynn Bartholomew. Tonawanda, NY:
    Kids Can, 2002. 48p.   1-5507-4923-4; hb., $12.95   2001-903687-6     Gr. 4-8     621.3 

    Any young wannabe Einstein will love this book. Creativity has no limits with this author.  Bartholomew offers instructions on making numerous battery-powered gadgets to kids, young and old.  There are directions for making everything from an electronic backscratcher, to an illuminated fork, a robot hand or even electric dice.  His last chapter offers, "More Mischief" for those readers who want a bigger challenge, encouraging the child to combine what he has learned up to that point and create his own customized gadgets.  Not only does the author include all materials and tools necessary for the projects, but he outlines in simple and thorough detail, how to make battery connections. The illustrated examples are colorful and easy-to-follow. Kids, Moms and
Dads can't help but get charged up over this 2002 publication.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Cartlidge, Cherese.  HOME WINDMILLS.  Chicago, IL:  Norwood House Press, 2009.
          48p.  ISBN: 978-1-59953-192-2 hb.      Gr. 4-8     j 621.4

          For students looking for information on alternative energy, this is the book for them. Lots of basic information on energy, fossil fuels, costs for electricity and the birth of the home windmill. Throughout the book there are "Did You Know?" boxes with tidbits of information and boxes with "Bright Ideas" that give even more interesting facts. The book includes a glossary of terms and a list of  websites to go to for more information. Cartlidge gives children a great resource for alternative energy and current facts on wind power.
          Charlotte Dugas, Library Director, Munising School Public Library

Clements, Andrew. WORKSHOP. Illus. by David Wisniewski. New York: Clarion Books,
    1999. 32p. 0-395-85579-9  hb. $16.00.    97-48534    PreS-Gr. 3     E   or    621.9

    Clements and Wisniewski are a winning team!  Clement's brief poetic text and Caldecott winner Wisniewski's elaborate cut-paper illustrations create a perfect balance in describing the many tools in a toolbox and the jobs they do. Each plays its own part in creating something wonderful. However, the reader has to read through to the end to discover what it is that is being built. Sorry--no hints!
    Patricia Fittante, Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Dahl, Michael.  ROLL, SLOPE, AND SLIDE:  A BOOK ABOUT RAMPS.  Illus. by  Denise Shea.  
      Minneapolis, MN:  Picture Window Books, 2006.  24p. ISBN: 1-4048-1304-7     K-3     j621.8

            This Amazing Science book about ramps defines them as inclined planes, and illustrates their practical uses 
for moving people and objects.  Kids will identify with the planes used by skateboarders and the playground slides, 
as well as wheelchair ramps and luggage carousels.  Also included are a glossary, bibliography and related websites.
            Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Fisher, Leonard Everett.  ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL.  New York: Atheneum, 1999.
    unp.  0-689-81607; hb.,   $16.00   97-32217    Gr. 1-7      621.358   or   608

    This handsome picture book, done in black and white, shows various people and places as well as contains diagrams of the telephone patent, illustrations of visible speech, and a sketch of the "vacuum jacket" which helped people breathe 50 years before the iron lung was invented.  Although the book is short, there is lots of interesting information packed into it.
    The Bell's came from Scotland to Canada and Grahame, later called Aleck, became a citizen only after inventing the telephone.  His father-in-law, also an investor, sent for the patent on Bell's behalf when he realized that Bell did not do so. This was fortuitous because even so, there were many lawsuits regarding ownership.   Bell invented a metal detector which was used to locate the bullet in President Garfield's abdomen and he succeeded his father-in-law as president of the National Geographic Society.  Bell was very interested in deaf people and contributed most of the income from his Volta Laboratory inventions to help them.   His own mother was partially deaf and his father was consumed with improving human speech. Grahame's expertise in understanding the human voice box and ear made his a teacher at the University of Edinburgh the age of 21.  Aleck introduced Helen Keller, the daughter of a friend, to her teacher, Anne Sullivan.
      Prices and statistics are interesting and are woven into the text.  A chronology is also useful. Fisher's book can be used not only by primary and intermediate students but will be appreciated by anyone who is interested in Bell and his inventions.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Pawson, Des.  THE HANDBOOK OF KNOTS: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO TYING
    AND USING MORE THAN 100 KNOTS.    Illus. with photos.  New York: DK, 1998.
    160p.   0-7894-2395-2; pb., $16.95.    97-38707   Gr. 4-12+      623.88

     Using different colors of line to clearly show the exact way to tie the knots, the photos and the short, but clear directions make the book very useful.   The book is well laid out and the format is inviting for anyone interested in knot typing, even "eager" beginners and intermediates.  The author explaines which knot to use for specific tasks.   This book is of interest to sailors, boaters, hikers, rock and mountain climbers, scouts, etc.   It could also be used as a text for Coast Guard auxiliary safe boating classes or for teaching survival skills making it especially valuable to libraries near lakes and wilderness areas.  Even the size of the book is a plus, making it portable.  Highly recommended.
    Penny Pederson, teacher and librarian, Gravereat Middle School, Marquette, MI
   *Editor's note: Penny has spent a lifetime around boats and when macrame was in vogue

 Rubin, Susan Goldma.  TOILETS, TOASTERS AND TELEPHONES.  San Diego,
    Harcourt, 1998. 132p.  0-15-201421-7;hb., $20.00    Gr. 3-9+    683.8  or  621

     Have you ever wondered when the first carpet sweeper was invented? (1858).  Are you surprised that the first modern indoor toilet with a wooden seat was built around 2000 B.C. in a place in Crete?  Are you aware that the first refrigerator for food was a wooden box invented by a Maryland farmer to carry milk and butter to market?  This book is every bit as unique as its title.  It is a fascinating history of everyday objects, but filled with entertaining anecdotes and remarkable facts.  The book includes more than thirty vintage photographs and many mellow old illustrations by Warnick.  Rubin has created a novelty that is defiantly user-friendly and is sure to emit the glow of a red light for anyone browsing the shelves.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
 

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622 MINING

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622.341 MINING--IRON

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623 COMMUNICATIONS-RADIO-TV-PHONE

Mooney, Carla.  PILOTLESS PLANES. A Great Idea Series.  Chicago, IL:
      Norwood House Press, 2011.  48p. ISBN: 139781599533810   Gr. 5-8  .NF 623.74

      Our wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have introduced the use of new weaponry.  One of those tools is a plane without a pilot, or a drone.  Pilotless Planes describes and explains how these planes operate and the importance of them in a war.  As with many nonfiction books, there is a glossary for the young reader, and index, and a place to find more information on this technology. 
      Christine Collins, Library Director, L'Anse Area Schools/Public Library

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629.04 LAND TRANSPORTATION

DeGezelle, Terri and Gail Saunders-Smith.  GARBAGE TRUCKS.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2006.  24p.  
          ISBN: 13: 978-0-7368-5356-9     Gr. K-3      j629.225

          This book is sure to fuel a child's fascination with trucks; andespecially  garbage trucks. Full-page, color photos
show the inside of the truck's cab, as well as the mechanics of lifting, crushing and dumping the garbage. A glossary, 
website, and references are included for the more curious reader.
          Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Ethan, Eric.  CAMAROS.  Ilus. with photos.  Muscle Car Series.  Milwaukee, WI:
    Gareth Stevens, 1998.  24p.  0-8368-1742-7 lib. bdg. $18.60   Gr. 2-6   629.22

    Anyone interested in classic cars will love reading about the history of the GM Camaro.  This book covers the interior and exterior and engine parts.  It also has some information about the original cost of the car and its highest speeds.  Car buffs will enjoy this series.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Ethan, Eric.  CORVETTES.  Illus with photos.  Muscle Car Series.  Milwaukee, WI:
    Gareth Stevens, 1998.  24p.  0836817443, lib. bdg., $18.60     Gr. 2-6+    629.22

     What kid doesn't fantasize about growing up and someday owning a Corvette?  Well, at least driving one!  Can you believe the very first Corvettes in 1953  cost about $2,500.   By 1963 with all the power options the price soared to $5,000. Care to venture a guess on today's price?  Try multiplying by ten or an original.  However, this won't dampen the enthusiasm of  Vet vets as they absorb all the facts and figures in this attractive addition to the Muscle Car Series.  The format and text may be simplistic, but even older browsers will find this one intriguing and might even want to further Investigate the web sites and places to write which are found at the back of the book.  Other books in the series are: Camaros; Cobras; Firebirds; GTOs; and, Mustangs.
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

Ethan, Eric.  FIREBIRDS.  Ilus. with photos.  Muscle Car Series.  Milwaukee, WI:
    Gareth Stevens, 1998.  24p.  0-8368-1745-1 lib. bdg. $18.60   Gr. 2-6   629.22

    Anyone interested in classic cars will love reading about the history of the GM Firebird.  This book covers the interior and exterior and engine parts.  It also has some information about the original cost of the car and its highest speeds.  Car buffs will enjoy this series.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Ethan, Eric.  MUSTANGS.  Illus. with photos.  Great American Muscle Cars Series.
    Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 1998.  24 p.   0-8368-1747-8; lib.bdg., $18.60
    97-41188    Gr. 2-9      629.22

    This  book, part of  a series of books called, Great American Muscle Cars, an Imagination Library Series, passes along America's love for automobiles.  Using bright photographs of these admired cars, Ethan takes the reader along for a ride.  He provides the history of the Mustang and teaches some basic automobile terminology.  Readers with a limited knowledge of cars would benefit by reading this book.  The inclusion of web sites and a list of places to write, encourages the reader to continue to explore beyond the book.  This title is a book for anyone interested in automobiles, especially the muscle car enthusiast.
    Paula Diedrich; teacher, Graveraet Middle School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

Granowsky, Alvin.  DIGGERS AND CRANES.  My World series; Level 3.
    Brookfield, CT:    Copper Beech, 2000.  32p.  0-7613-1222-6; lib.bdg., $17.90
    0-7613-2293-0; pb., $3.99      Gr. 1-3       ER   or   621.8

    The illustrations in most of the books in this series are a combination of drawings and photos and in many instances that detracts from the message.  This book completely utilizes color photos to accompany the easy text that explains what each digger does making it more realistic than others in the series.  The review section of the book labels those machines that have wheels and those that have tracks.  The second review labels activities of diggers.  This book is highly recommended for emerging readers but use it with new adult readers also.  This is one of the best titles in this easy reader series and is a first purchase.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Grimes, Nikki.  TALKIN’ ABOUT BESSIE: THE STORY OF AVIATOR ELIZABETH
    COLEMAN.  Illus by E. B. Lewis.  New York: Orchard/Scholastic, 2002.  32p.
    0-439-35243-6; hb., $16.95     97-21978     Gr. 1-4     629.13

    Despite all odds, Bessie Coleman overcame poverty, racism, and gender discrimination to become the first African-American female pilot.  Each double-page spread contains a picture and the name of someone who talks about Bessie beginning with her father, a man of African and Choctaw blood.  Each of the 21 poetic descriptions of Bessie is opposite a full-page painting.  This oral biography is a pictured book that wil
also appeal to older readers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Hill, Randal C.  LAMBORGHINI.  Mankato, MN: Capstone Press, 2009.  31p. 
          ISBN: 978-4296-2381-0  hb. $16.95.    Gr. 2-5    j629.222

          Ferruccio Lamborghini's first business was building tractors, but his passion was sports cars, which went into production in 1964.  The text of the book is in English and Spanish, a paragraph in English, followed by a paragraph in Spanish. It contains abundant photographs of the sleek, beautiful Lamborghini sports car illustrating the car's features--everything except the price.  A glossary and internet sites are included at the end of the book which is sure to appeal to car buffs of all ages.
          Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Hunter, Ryan Ann.  DIG A TUNNEL.  Illus by Edward Miller.  New York:  Holiday,
     1999.   0823413918   98-538      K-3.    624.1or E

     Simplicity is the key to this easy-read nonfiction picture book, but the world of tunnels is anything but simplistic.  Hunter does a fantastic job describing the many kinds of tunnels and all the places they can take people...deep into the earth to search for gold and treasures, through mountains or under rivers.  Some tunnels can even float and take people right through bodies of water.  The lively test is written in a language that even the youngest reader can understand while Millers' bright and bold illustrations lend to the explanation and understanding of how to "Dig a Tunnel."
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

MacLeod, Elizabeth.  THE WRIGHT BROTHERS: A FLYING START.  Illus with
    photos.  Tonawanda, NY:  Kids Can, 2002.  32p.  1-55074-933-1; hb., $14.85
    C2001-901519-4     Gr. 2-8     920     or   629.13

    There is lots of information packed into this picture book biography.  The photos are organized in collages and sidebars and there are numerous drawings and maps.  One could learn much just from reading the letters and captions accompanying the photos and drawings.  From the quotes and the drawings of the brothers, with speech balloons coming from their mouths, readers learn about the Wright brothers, their jobs, their inventions, and their passion for flight.  The text explains the history of flight before and after the brothers’ contribution and the hundreds of mistakes they made before their success.  There is a time line of Wilbur and Orville’s lives and the history of flight, five helpful web sites, and an index.  This is an informative biography for primary and intermediate students as well as for remedial middle and high school students.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Marx, Mandy.  ATVíS.  Minneapolis, MN:  Capstone Press, 2006.  32p.  ISBN 0-7368-5473-8 hb. $14.95   
     Gr. 3-8   j629.22

     Actual photographs help readers learn about All Terrain Vehicles (ATV).  From racing to riding safely, this is an 
informative book for children interested in ATVís.  Resources at the back of the book, such as the glossary and related 
Internet sites, make it valuable to children and adults in this interest group.
      Debra Ely, Assistant Librarian, Ishpeming Carnegie Public Library

Mitton, Tony.  TOUGH TRUCKS.  Illus. by Ant Parker.  Amazing Machines series.
    Boston, MA:  Kingfisher Books, 2005.  24 p.  ISBN: 0-753-459-175 pb. $3.95
    Gr. PreS-K   629

    A trio of cartoon characters drive the trucks in this book, which is one in the Amazing Machines series of books.  Logging trucks, large delivery trucks, big tractor trailer rigs, garbage trucks, concrete trucks, dump trucks, and tankers are all colorfully illustrated.  The drawings are bright and the truck details are clearly shown.  The descriptions are in verse and there is a picture dictionary on the last page which explains pistons, CB radios, and tractor rigs.  This book will appeal to the preschool group.
    Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Library Board

Mitten, Tony.  TREMENDOUS TRACTORS.  Illus. by Ant Parker.  Amazing machines series.
    Boston: Kingfisher Books, 2005.  24 p. ISBN: 0-7534-5918-3  pb. $3.95  Gr. PreS-K   631.3

    Tremendous Tractors is part of the Amazing Machines series of books.  A trio of animal cartoon characters demonstrate
the various uses of the tractor:  pulling a plow, a disk harrow, a roller, a seed drill, a mower, a bailer, a wagon, and a trailer.  The book not only clearly shows the usefulness of the tractor, but also the work it allows the farmer to accomplish throughout the year.  The descriptions are in verse and the brightly colored illustrations detail the working parts of the tractor.  The picture dictionary on the last page gives more detail on various tractor parts. This book will appeal to the 2-5 year old.
    Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Library Board

Pearson, Deborah.  HARD-WORKING WHEELS.  Illus by Chum McLeod.
    Mighty Wheels series.  Toronto/New York:  Annick, 2000.  24p.  1-55037-615-2;
    lib.bdg., $15.95  1-55037-614-4; pb., $5.95     PreS-Gr. 2     629.225

    A dozen working vehicles are shown including a farm tractor, school bus, cherry picker, backhoe, bulldozer, fire engine, and bookmobile.  The watercolor illustrations provide excellent representations of the working vehicles.  The text contains concise and descriptive sentences in bold type.  Libraries can never have too many books about vehicles for younger children.   Even the smallest library budget can include the sturdy paperback edition.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Schlepp, Tammy J.  THINGS ON WHEELS.  My World series; Level 3.  Brookfield, CT:
    Copper Beech, 2000.  32p.  0-7613-1219-6; lib.bdg., $17.90   0-7613-2336-8;
    pb., $3.99       00-060132    Gr. 1-3    ER    or    629.2

    The first sentence is “Wheels are everywhere!”  After a few explanatory sentences, the author provides a variety of examples.  “A wheel is shaped like a circle.  A wheel moves round and round.  A wheel is used for moving things.”   The photos are appealing and the items with wheels will appeal to readers; i.e., in-line skates, ambulances, fire trucks, motorcycles, tractors, caterpillars, moon buggies, and roller coasters.  Two sets of double page spreads at the end of the book involve readers.  The second question is more difficult and asks readers to tell what the wheels are made of.  Answers are provided on the index page.  The answers to the last question is either wood or metal.  This is an excellent addition to easy reader collection and is a first purchase.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Schuette, Sarah.  HOT RODS.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2007.  32p.
            ISBN: 13: 978-0-7368-6781-8 hb. $14.95.   Gr.1-6    j629.228

            HOT RODS is an informative, factual book for young readers with an interest in old cars.  The text is short and to the point.  The reader will learn what it takes to make a hot rod on the inside and the outside of the vehicle.  Car parts and car modifications necessary for a car to be a hot rod are clearly pointed out in both the text and the pictures.   Photographs of the actual painting of a car really tell the story of the amount of deconstruction involved in preparing a car for it's transformation.  I enjoyed the many photos completed hot rods.  I would highly recommend this book for a wide span of age levels.  Pre-readers would look at the pictures.  Older readers would be able to learn terms and utilize the recommended internet sites. 
            Heidi Bretall, Board member, Bessemer Public Library

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629.13 AIRCRAFT

Bledsoe, Glen and Karen. THE WORLD'S FASTEST HELICOPTERS.
    Mankato, MN:  Capstone Books, 2002.  48 p. 0-7368-1059-5; lib.bdg, $21.26
    2001-3440     Gr. 3-6     629.233

    What goes up must come down!  What better way to learn about helicopters and just how they execute the particular fete of flight than to select this title?  While the readers is treated to intense-color photographs of these whirlybirds, at the same time they can learn about the history and development of some of the world's fastest copters.  Features and specifications of aircraft such as the SA 360 Dauphin, Boeing-Sikorsky, RAH-66 Comanche, AH-64 Apache and the V-22 Osprey are discussed at a level that is understandable to the young aircraft enthusiast.  The book is slim but full of fascinating information and will help expand the understanding of these powerful flying machines.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Grimes, Nikki.  TALKIN’ ABOUT BESSIE: THE STORY OF AVIATOR
    ELIZABETH  COLEMAN.  Illus by E. B. Lewis.  New York: Orchard/Scholastic,
    2002.  32p.   0-439-35243-6; hb., $16.95     97-21978     Gr. 1-4     629.13

    Despite all odds, Bessie Coleman overcame poverty, racism, and gender discrimination to become the first African-American female pilot.  Each double-page spread contains a picture and the name of someone who talks about Bessie beginning with her father, a man of African and Choctaw blood.  Each of the 21 poetic descriptions of Bessie is opposite a full-page painting.  This oral biography is a pictured book that will appeal to older readers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

MacLeod, Elizabeth.  THE WRIGHT BROTHERS: A FLYING START.
    Illus with  photos.  Tonawanda, NY:  Kids Can, 2002.  32p.  1-55074-933-1; hb.,
    $14.85   C2001-901519-4     Gr. 2-8     920     or   629.13

    There is lots of information packed into this picture book biography.  The photos are organized in collages and sidebars and there are numerous drawings and maps.  One could learn much just from reading the letters and captions accompanying the photos and drawings.  From the quotes and the drawings of the brothers, with speech balloons coming from their mouths, readers learn about the Wright brothers, their jobs, their inventions, and their passion for flight.  The text explains the history of flight before and after the brothers’ contribution and the hundreds of mistakes they made before their success.  There is a time line of Wilbur and Orville’s lives and the history of flight, five helpful web sites, and an index.  This is an informative biography for primary and intermediate students as well as for remedial middle and high school students.  Freedman’s Newbery Honor book, THE WRIGHT BROTHERS: HOW THEY INVENTED THE AIRPLANE (Holiday, 1991), is for older readers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Mauer, Richard.  THE WRIGHT SISTER: KATHARINE WRIGHT AND HER
    FAMOUS BROTHERS.  Brookfield, CT:  Roaring Brook/Millford, 2003.  127p.
    2002-151080     Gr. 4-9+    629.13    or    92

    Freedman’s classic Newbery honor book, THE WRIGHT BROTHERS: HOW THEY INVENTED THE AIRPLANE (Holiday, 1991) mentions Katharine Wright several times but does not dwell on any contributions toward helping her brothers.  The focus of Freedman’s, and most other books about the famous brothers, is different.
    When Katharine’s mother died when she was fourteen and Katherine took over the household.  At that time, few people attended college and the few women who did had separate courses of study.  Katherine graduated from Oberlin College in Dayton where men and women not only attended the first coed classes, but studied for the same degree.  Katharine was the only Wright to have a college degree.  She returned home and became a high school Latin teacher but had to give it up when she helped her brothers.   When they were in France, Katharine conducted luncheon meetings in French with “important social and business contacts for her brothers.  Afterward she usually went to the flying field to meet other important people.  Her job was to say non, as often as was polite, to requests for her brothers’ attendance at teas, dinners, parties, and banquets.  There were enough occasions when she had to say oui to make their social life interesting.”   One army officer, Lieut. Lahm,  “was one of the first to notice that Katharine was more than a sister to her brothers...I came to know and appreciate the sterling character of the third member of the team who was with them through the vicissitudes of those early days, sharing their hopes and disappointments.”
    Katherine married her friend Harry Haskell, a widower, whom she had know for 30 years since their Oberlin days.  By that time Wilbur and his father had died and Katherine and Orville lived in a large home called Hawthorn Hill.  Orville was reluctant to let her go and refused to let her be married from Hawthorn Hill and she was married at the home of friends of the bride and groom.  If she married, Orville “didn’t want anything to do with her ever again.”  However, two years and three months after her marriage, Katharine died of pneumonia at the age of fifty-four.  Orville relented and did come to see her the day before she died.  Because this is a different viewpoint from other books about the Wright Brothers, it is important for school and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Old, Wendie.  TO FLY: THE STORY OF THE WRIGHT BROTHERS.  Illus by
    Robert Andrew Parker.  New York:  Clarion, 2002.  48p.  0-618-13347-X; hb., $16.00
    2001-047219     Gr. 1-5     629.13    or    92

    This informative picture book begins with a poem by Beverly McLoughland.  Most of the 15 chapters include text opposite an illustration.  This pattern is relieved by three double page spreads where text is superimposed on the watercolor illustration and five instances where the text is longer than one page.  Readers learn about the Wrights and their dream of flying, building kites, working in their bicycle shop, and various experiments with planes.  There is also a flight timeline, list of books for further reading, notes, epilogue, and an index.  This is a good choice for school and public library picture book biography collections because Freedman’s Newbery Honor book, THE WRIGHT BROTHERS: HOW THEY INVENTED THE AIRPLANE (Holiday, 1991), is for older readers.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Shearer, Deborah A.  ASTRONAUTS AT WORK.  War Planes series. Mankato, MN: 
    Bridgestone, 2001.  4p. 0-7368-1142-7; lib.bdg., $18.60  2001-003437   Gr. 1-3   629.45

    Easy does it.  Done in the simplest dissemination of information and in an eye-appealing format, this space education book is sure to enthrall the youngest of readers. Each double spread features one topic with a brilliant photograph illustrating that subject.  What makes it even more appealing is that on the bottom of each text page is a small bright, eye-catching red circle with an adjacent bright blue line directing the reader down to a space-related word and its definition.  Simple but effective!   Informative, but fun!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Sweetman, Bill.  COMBAT RESCUE HELICOPTERS: THE MH-53 PAVE LOWS .
    War Planes series.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2002. 32 p.
    0-7368-1067-6; lib.bdg., $ 21.26  2001-003748    Gr.  3-6    623.7

    Although it was published for a juvenile market this title treats a complex subject with too little information.  It discusses the design and equipment of the Sikonsky helicopter, known as the Pave Low, and its use by the Air Force in military missions, but it stops there.  However, to the author's credit, he does include a glossary, useful addresses and web sites that could lead to more information about this monster whirleybird.  Nearly half the pages of the book are photographs that will intrigue those who are just browsing; especially young aircraft enthusiasts who are too young to totally absorb the printed word or use it for a report.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Welch, Rosanne.  ENCYCLOPEDIA OF WOMEN IN AVIATION AND SPACE.
    Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 1999.  286p.  0-87436-958-4   Gr. 8+   920  or  629.13

    The over 150 entries include groups such as ATA, the Air Transport Auxiliary of "civilian pilots [who] ferried planes from manufacturers to the Royal Air Forces bases to save military pilots for battle in World War II" as well as individual pilots.  Some of the women accomplished the following feats: first woman to fly from Paris to Tokyo; first woman to fly solo from England to New Zealand; first woman to complete officer training as an air weapons controller in the Canadian Air Force; first woman to make a parachute jump; first woman to fly a jet fighter; first woman to qualify for space travel; first woman to break the sound barrier; first African American woman to earn a pilot's license.  Many are unknown but some are household words: Jacqueline Cochran; Amelia Earhart; Kelly Flinn;  Shannon Lucid; Sharon Christa McAuliffe; Oveta Culp Hobby;  and  Judith Resnik.  Other topics include Mercury 1; NASA.  The bibliography consists of organizational sources and print sources.  The black and white photos are sparse.  High schools can use it for studying scientists, American history, space exploration, and historical and contemporary biographies.  Public and university libraries will be interested in this book for the reference collection.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
 

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 629.4 SPACE FLIGHT

Becklake, Sue.  SPACE:  STARS, PLANETS, AND SPACECRAFT.
    Illus by Brian Delf and Luciano Corbella.  See and Explore series.  New York:
    Dorling Kindersley, 1998.  64p.  0-7894-2966-7; pb., $7.95    520

    Beginning with sky watching through binoculars, Becklake goes on to talk about rocket power, engines, fuel, payload, and boosters and the stages it takes for a rocket like Ariane to enter space and return.  Also covered are how satellites work, what satellites do, what it is like to look back at earth, living in a space station, how Apollo missions mapped the moon, and moon exploring equipment.  After a general view of the solar system, Becklake talks about studying various planets, comets and meteors, life and death of a star, black holes, and galaxies.
    Stobelaur says the large photos are a highlight of the book and help readers to understand the text.  The drawings like a girl blowing up a balloon to explain the Big Bang theory of the universe.  Because of the illustrations, this book is great for browsing.   The book ends with sky maps of both hemispheres and an index.  Strobelaur finds the  book accurate and recommends it as a good starter book for all aspects of space even though there are newer spacecraft and satellites.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

Bredeson, Carmen.  OUR SPACE PROGRAM.  I Know America series.
    Brookfield:  Millbrook,   1999.  48p.    0-7613-0952-7; lib.bdg., $20.90
    0-7613-1349-4; pb., $8.95   Gr.  3-6    629.4

    This series explores various historical and cultural events.  Examining the U.S. space program from the end of World War II to space stations of the future, a wealth of scientific fact is presented in cultural context.  However  it reads like an adventure story.  Other reader-friendly aspects are large, easy to read print, numerous photographs, short chapters and plenty of white space.  Colored blocks of text cover short topics and encourage readers to investigate further.  Although some information is slightly outdated by recent events, the text carries us into the future by presenting planned projects and invites ongoing study.  A chronology is appended to assist the reader in placing events in historic perspective, and a bibliography for further study is included.  This book should be especially useful to students of limited reading ability and as an introduction to more specific study of the topic.
    Carolyn Anderson, L'Anse Public Library Board;  Superiorland Library Cooperative Board

Bredeson, Carmen.  SHANNON LUCID: SPACE AMBASSADOR.  Gateway Biography
    series.  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 1998.  48p.  0-7613-0406-1;  lib.bdg., $20.90
    0-7613-1375-3; pb., $8.95.    97-47147   Gr.2-4   629.45   or     92

    The book begins with Lucid's return from the Russian space station Mir after being there 6 months, longer than any other American Astronaut.  Born during World War II, the Oklahoman majored in chemistry as an undergraduate and received her  M.A. and Ph.D. in biochemistry. Her second daughter born before receiving her M.A. and she received her PhD. before her son was born.  Lucid was the only mother in group of first six female astronauts.  Her three children were in teens when she went up in shuttles Discovery, Atlantis, and Columbia; her children were  in their 20s when she flew on Mir.  Further reading, a chronology, and an index are included. This book is an excellent choice because it is not just a biography of an exemplary female role model, but because it provides information about the U.S. space program with information about life in space especially on the space shuttles and cooperation with the Russians on the space station, Mir.   Other women in this series include: Maya Angelou, Susan B. Anthony, Hillary Rodham Clinton, Elizabeth Dole, Amelia Earhart, Christa McAuiffe, and  Mother Teresa.  This is a solid choice for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Nicolson, Cynthia Pratt.  EXPLORING SPACE.  Illus by Bill Slavin.  Starting with
    Space series.  Niagra Falls, NY:  Kids Can, 2000.  40p.  1-55074-711-8; lib. bdg.,
    $12.95    1-55074-713-4; pb., $6.95    C99-933010-1  Gr. 2-6    629.4

    Almost 30 questions and answers, introductory matter for each section, and seven labs called "Try It!" are the structure for this book.  Sample questions are:  “Who invented the telescope?”  “When were rockets invented?”   “How do rockets work?”   “How do astronauts prepare for space?”  “What is a space probe?”   “What have space probes discovered about comets and asteroids?”   “How do modern astronomers learn about the stars?”  “Will people ever travel to the stars?”   Some of the labs are to make a two-stage balloon rocket, testing your moon strength, and decoding a binary message using graph paper and a pencil.  This book provides good basic details of space and how to get there.  The best feature is the clever hands on activities that are simple but meaningful and help students understand the concepts.  EXPLORING SPACE is recommended for intermediate students despite the inaccuracy that appears on page 31 where the Pathfinder of 1997 is mentioned but the photo is of the Viking in 1976.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

Shearer, Deborah A.  ASTRONAUTS AT WORK.  War Planes series.
    Mankato, MN:   Bridgestone, 2001.  24p. 0-7368-1142-7; lib.bdg., $18.60
    2001-003437    Gr. 1-3     629.45

    Easy does it.  Done in the simplest dissemination of information and in an eye-appealing format, this space education book is sure to enthrall the youngest of readers. Each double spread features one topic with a brilliant photograph illustrating that subject.  What makes it even more appealing is that on the bottom of each text page is a small bright, eye-catching red circle with an adjacent bright blue line directing the reader down to a space-related word and its definition.  Simple but effective!   Informative, but fun!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Wilkinson, Philip.  SPACEBUSTERS: THE RACE TO THE MOON.  Illus with photos.
    Eyewitness Readers Series; Level 3.    Dorling Kindersley, 1998. 48p   0-7864-2961-6, pb.
    $3.95.    Gr. 2-3.    629.45   or   ER

    This easy reader, accompanied by photos and drawings, tells of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon.  Information in the text makes it easier to understand, for example the size of the entire spacecraft is taller than a skyscraper or when the outside of the spacecraft becomes heated it is 25 times hotter than a kitchen oven.   At the end of the book there are recent photos of the three Apollo 11 astronauts and what they are going now.  Helpful features are a glossary and a sidebar on each page which provides additional information.   All children, even second and third graders, should know about the first human landing on the moon and this well illustrated book contains lots of interesting facts.  The only drawback is that the danger is minimized, making a complicated task  look too easy.  Highly recommended for easy reading by emerging child or adult readers.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
 

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634.9 FORESTRY

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630 AGRICULTURE

Gerver, Jane E.  GROW A PUMPKIN PIE .  My First Hello Reader series; level 1.
    Illus  by Rammy Speer-Lyon.  New York:  Scholastic Cartwheel, 2000.   32p.
    0-439- 20056-3; pb., $4.95    99-087748   PreS-Gr. 1   635.62    or     ER

    Learn how to make a pumpkin pie from planting to seed to eating the pie and saving seeds for next year.  There are stiff cards in the middle that have perforated edges so readers can match a picture with the word.  Five other activities and answers are included.  The rhymes in this book are natural and easy to read.  Use in the fall for Halloween or Thanksgiving.
   Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Gibbons, Gail.  THE BERRY BOOK.  Illus by the author.  New York:  Holiday,
    2002.  32p.  0-8234-1697-6; hb., $16.95  2001-040602    K-Gr. 3   634.7

    Using simple sentences, Gibbons tells about different sizes, shapes, and colors of berries.  Although there is much interesting and correct information in the book, there are some problems.  Although Gibbons isolates three poisonous berries by a thin white line, it will not be obvious to some readers that the bunchberries, elderberries, and currents are not in the same category as the mistletoe, holly, and snowberries.  There is also a problem with sizes.  On the page that tells about birds, wild animals, and people eating berries; the blue jay is larger than the people or the bear.  Even though they are in separate spaces and the berries are in size relationship to the people and the bear, this is disturbing.  The text on one page says “Blueberries grow on blueberry bushes” and the picture shows a woman picking from a bush that is as tall as she is.  Sizes of cultivated and wild berries are accurately shown but readers are led to believe that both are grown on high bushes when in fact, wild plants are close to the ground and are not tall bushes like the domestic berry bushes that are shown.  At the end of the book there are seven steps to growing strawberries and eight steps to making a blueberry pie.  Step four takes the whole process of making a crust and reduces it to one sentence, “Spread pastry dough into a 9 inch (22.5cm) pie pan.”  It would have been better to take a package of two frozen crusts and use one for the top and one for the bottom than to misrepresent the process.  The recipe for strawberry jam does not include using gel or pectin to set it.  The recipe for raspberry ice cream contains only two steps, mixing cream, berries, salt, and sugar and placing it in the freezer.  The book concludes with eleven interesting facts about berries.  It is unfortunate that there are so many problems with this book because the topic is worth sharing.  This book is not up to Gibbons’ careful standards.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Gibbons, Gail.  The Pumpkin Book.  Illus by the author.  New York: Holiday, 1999.
     unp.   0-8234-1465-5, lib. bdg, . $16.95   98-45267  PreS-Gr.4+  635.62

     Gibbons begins by showing the different varieties of pumpkins available, what is necessary to grow them, planting by drill behind a tractor or in a hill by hand.  Readers learn about the about flower and how vines dry up when they are ripe. Other interesting tidbits include details about the largest pumpkin grown, pumpkin involvement in Thanksgiving and  Halloween, how to carve or decorate pumpkins, how to dry pumpkin seeds.  There is information about Native Americans and pumpkins that can be used with studies of several  tribes.  Gibbons' book will be popular all year but especially in October and November.
     Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Hawkes, Nigel.  GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD: STIMULATING TALKING
    POINTS FOR LIVELY DISCUSSION.  Illus. with photos.  Saving our World series.
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2000.  32p.  0-7613-1154-8; lib.bdg., $21.90  Gr. 3-9+   631.5

    Seldom is a nonfiction book on a controversial topic as appealing as well as informative.  Genetically modified foods are in the news but few people understand what that really entails.  This book provides pros and cons for the changing way food is produced and why in an understandable straightforward manner.  The photos and pictures add to the understanding of the text and are placed in a strategic and attractive manner.  There is a “Talking Point” on every other page that is artistically divided from the rest of the page.  The summary, environmental addresses, glossary, and index all include colorful illustrations.   All of the illustrations are designed to make this book accessible to readers of all ages.  Some topics covered are how genetic modification started, how genes are cut, the role of DNA, farming practices, what crops and animals are included, why GM crops are needed, effects on nature, safety procedures, health and environmental issues.  For a basic book covering both sides of the issue in clear language, this is a book, originally published in England, will appeal to students and adults who are curious about the topic.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Richard Strieter, Bay Port, MI, farmer for 45 years

Lerner, Carol.  MY INDOOR GARDEN. Illus. by the author.  New York:  Morrow, 1999.
    48p. 0-688-14753-4; hb.,  $14.00  0-688-14754-2, lib.bdg. $16.00.   98-18929    Gr. 3-8+   635.9

    The "Getting Started" section includes information about: light; temperature;  humidity; choosing plants; equipment; and composts. "Plant Care" includes: watering; fertilizer; pests; hygiene; disease; pinching back; repotting; and vacation time.  "Growing Your Own Plants" includes: plants from seed, two plants from one; layering, plantlets,; division; leaf segments; and several types of cuttings.  Young people, and others interested in houseplants, will be captivated with this basic picture book guide to caring for and propagating houseplants.  There are numerous, clear watercolor illustrations.  Bonuses include how to understand and use Latin names and how to read fertilizer labels.  The Northern Michigan University Garden Club members were delighted to find answers quickly to houseplant queries in the summation chart.   Highly recommended.
    Roberta Henderson, Emeritus, Northern Michigan University, Retired reference Librarian and teacher of Young Adult Literature.

Levenson, George.  PUMPKIN CIRCLE: THE STORY OF A GARDEN.
    Photos by Shmuel Thaler.  Berkeley, CA:  Tricycle, 1999.  40p.  1-58246-004-3; hb.,
    $14.95   99-20081     Gr.K-3+    E    or  636.62      PAULIN'S PICK

    School and public libraries will want this book for Halloween, Thanksgiving, and general plant study.  Teachers will anxiously wait for this book to come out in a paperback edition.  Readers see pumpkins grow from seeds, experience pollination, then watch the pumpkins return to the earth to begin the cycle again.  It is the total  presentation that makes this book so spectacular.  The photographs are outstanding, one double spread takes readers right into the throat of the blossom.  The text is in rhyme and swirls and slides on the page or just provides balance.  Despite the variety of places where the text is found on the page, there is no trouble reading the type against the various backgrounds.  The last page contains information on "How to Grow Pumpkins."  This versatile book is an essential purchase and one of my nominations for the Caldecott Medal this year, if a book is eligible when it follows a video.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
   
 Micucci, Charles.  THE LIFE AND TIMES OF THE PEANUT.  Boston: Houghton,
    1997.  32p.  0-618-03314-9; pb.,   $5.95.  96-1290    Gr.k-4      641.3

    The watercolor illustrations in this Sandpiper paperback enhance the history of the peanut from 5,000 years ago in South America.  Information about legumes; the uniqueness of peanuts; parts of the plant; how they grow; harvesting; varieties; countries and states where grown; food and industry value; how peanut butter is made, then and now; peanut travels throughout the world; lyrics and music to the Goober Pea song; and information about George Washington Carver, the Peanut Wizard.  This book is useful when studying states.  Part of the book is dated--the 1994 statistics of leading peanut growing countries and states and the harvesting equipment which looks dated even by 1997 standards.  The peanut butter machine only shows the process and not the machinery so that it is not as easily dated.  Purchase with these problems in mind.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Peterson, Chris.  CENTURY FARM: ONE HUNDRED YEARS ON A FAMILY FARM .
    Photos by Alvis Upitis.  Honesdale. PA:  Boyds Mills, 1999.  32p. 1-56397-710-9, hb.
    $16.95.  98-71792   Gr. 2+   623.62

     The wife of a Wisconsin farmer writes in the first person in her husband's voice to tell about the 100 years of his family's farm and the changes that have taken place over the century.  When talking about the past, the accompanying  photos are in sepia, when sharing information about farming today, the photos are in color.   Comparisons between the past and present include barns, tractors, harvesters, milking,  washing clothes, cooking,  and recreation.   The author and photographer have collaborated in three other books, HORSEPOWER, HARVEST YEAR, and EXTRA CHEESE, PLEASE!   Although there are many different types of farms, this book will be enjoyed in farming communities to validate their experiences as well as by social studies classes at several levels.  This book is a refreshing antidote to the many versions of OLD MAC DONALD and his hayseed hat.  Recommended for elementary and children's collections in public libraries.
     Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Ray, Deborah Kogan.  LILY’S GARDEN.  Brookfield, CT:  Roaring Brook/Millbrook,
    2002.  32p.  0-7613-1593-4; hb., $16.96  0-7613-2653-7; lib.bdg., $23.90
    2002-008929      K-Gr. 3      641.3

    The book begins when “a box of juicy oranges arrived from Grandma and Grandpa” who have gone to live in California for a year.  The book consists of two side-by-side parts, the largest is a first person narrative from a unisex child who tells what it is like to live in Maine throughout the year.  There is a month listed on the bottom of each right hand page.  On the left hand page there is information about crops, some of which are in California where her grandparents are living for the season but most are in Maine.  The information about the crops appears in a sidebar on the left-hand page.
    The book has a Dewey Decimal number but the bulk of the narrative is more story-like than nonfiction.  This book is interesting but the book suffers from a split personality.  It is really a story.  The book ends in December when the grandparents return for the holidays to place the star on the Christmas tree.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Rockwell, Ann.  ONE BEAN.  Illus. by Megan Halsey.  New York: Walker, 1998.
    32p.   0-8027-8649-9; lib.bdg.,  $15.85     0-8027-8648-0; hb., $14.95
    0-8027-7572-1; pb.,  $5.95   97-36249      635.65   PAULIN'S PICKS.

    Told in the first person, a boy prepares a bean for planting, plants it in a paper cup, and then sees something wonderful.  When he and a girl transplant the bean in a flowerpot; sunshine makes it grow; and  buds, blossoms, and pods appear in the leaves.  When the pods are ripe, the boy opens it up and finds beans shaped just like the one he planted.  Then he eats them.  Activities and an afterword are included..  Readers learn from the afteword that this bean was a bush lima bean; a question that readers wonder about from the beginning of the book.  A conversation with the author revealed that she researched beans at Cornell, Rutgers, and the Iowa Bean Council.  Use this information to teach children about nonfiction and how important research and accuracy are to a nonfiction book.  Every teacher who has beans growing in the windowsill of the classroom will want a copy of this book and may not wait until it comes out in paperback.  Others at home or day care will also want to place the book next to the beans.   Have children plant beans in a paper cup after reading this story and a version of "Jack and the Beanstalk" at a public library story hour.   This is an outstanding nonfiction picture book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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634.9  FORESTRY

Appelbaum, Diana.  GIANTS IN THE LAND.  Illus. by Michael McCurdy.
    Boston:  Houghton , 1993.  32p.    0-39572289-6; hb., $16.00  0-618-03305-X;
    pb., $6.95       92-26526      Gr. 2-7+      634.9

   First published in 1993, the dramatic black and white scratchboard illustrations in this book are as majestic as the trees and the text.  The giant pine trees in New England were 25 stories high in 1760 and were used as masts for warships for King George's Royal Navy.  Appelbaum tells how they were logged, carried away by oxen, and dragged to the rivers to be sent to ships that would carry them to England.  This process ended when the American Revolution began.  Use this book with colonial or nature studies in intermediate and middle schools.  Public libraries need it also if they don't have it already.   It is a gem that deserves to be revived.
  Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Crowe, William S.  LUMBERJACK: INSIDE AN ERA IN THE UPPER PENINSULA
    OF MICHIGAN.
  3rd ed. Ed. By Lynn M. Emerick and Ann M. Weller.  Skandia, MI:
    North Country Publishing, 2002.  144p.    Northco@up.net   1-866-942-7898
    0-9650577-3-9; pb., $19.95   2002-104698    Gr. 8-12+    634.9

    This 50th anniversary edition was prepared by the author’s granddaughters to tell about the white pine era from the late 1800s to the early 1900s.  The author worked in the Upper Peninsula for the Chicago Lumbering Co. and Weston Lumber Co. and later purchased a lumber company in 1912, the Consolidated Lumber Co.
    Fourth grade teachers of Michigan History will appreciate sharing the 40 historical photographs, the U.P. map, and the glossary with their students when they are studying the lumber era.   Fourth graders will also be interested in the comparison of cowboys to lumberman and logging marks to cattle brands.  Fourth grade teachers will need to read the bulk of the book, originally articles, and share pertinent information with their students because the book is beyond the scope of most fourth graders.  Middle and high school students and adults interested in the logging era can read the book for themselves.  Thankfully the information presented here was not lost to future generations.
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center

Fitzgerald, Dawn.  JULIA BUTTERFLY HILL: SAVING THE REDWOODS.
    Gateway Green Biography series.  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  48p.
    0-7613-2654-5;  lib.bdg., $23.90   2001-044921   Gr. 2-6   333.74   or   92

    A tree-sitter is a person who sits in a tree to keep it from being clear-cut by a logging company.  Tree-sitting is dangerous because logging owners hire people to drop down unto the platforms and wrestle the sitters, helicopters hover close to the trees to disrupt the them, lights and noises keep sitters awake, and platforms can be dislodged by storms.  Tree-sitters are given code names to protect them and Julia chose Butterfly because she admired the creatures.  In 1997 Julia was supposed to relief-sit for a week for a tree-sitter in a tree called Luna in a redwood forest in California being clear cut by the Pacific Lumber Company which had been cited by the Environmental Protection Agency for 300 violations of the California State Forest Practice Act.  Julia broke the 90-day world record for the longest tree-sit and eventually was up there 738 days.  Concessions gained from the company were that Luna and all trees within a 200-foot area were saved, environmental groups paid the company for the land and that money went for environmental research.     Numerous color photos explain the events.  The book concludes with a list of important dates, notes, a bibliography of further reading including Hill’s autobiography and three web sites, and an index.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Yannuzzi, Della.  ALDO LEOPOLD: PROTECTOR OF THE WILD.  Gateway Green series.  
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  48p.  0-7613-2465-8; lib.bdg., $23.90   Gr. 2-6   333.7  or   92

    Instead of joining his family’s furniture business, Leopold went to Yale where he graduated from the Yale Forest School in 1909.  Yale’s program was the first forestry program in the U.S. and some of Leopold’s jobs for the U.S. Forest Service were to keep land from being overgrazed, prevent companies from cutting down too many trees, oversee a national forest, and work in a Forest Products Laboratory to conduct tests on wood products.
    Aldo taught at the University of Wisconsin in the first advanced program in game management and was pointed by President Franklin Roosevelt to a Committee on Wildlife Restoration.  A book published right after his death, A Sand Country Almanac, is important in the conservation movement.  Because of his speaking and writing, Aldo was called the Father of the National Wilderness System.
    The numerous color and black and white photos that explain the events are exceptionally clear.  The book concludes with a chronology, list of two books and four web sites for further information, list of articles and books consulted, and an index.  This is an excellent choice for environmental studies, career background, or for parts of the country containing wilderness areas.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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636 ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

Darling, Kathy.  THE ELEPHANT HOSPITAL. Photos by Tara Derling.  Brookfield, CT:
    Millbrook, 2002.  40p. 0-7613-1723-6; lib.bdg.,  $22.90    Gr. 3-5   636.9

    Why do elephants have wrinkled legs?  Give up?  (From tying their tennis Shoes too tight!)............Why do elephants have pointed tails?  Don't know? (from standing too close to the pencil sharpener!)  How do you take care of a sick elephant??   Take him to The Elephant Hospital.  And this is no joke!!  In 1994 the world's first Elephant Hospital was created in Thailand.  Darling describes the work of doctors and volunteers in just such a hospital and relates individual stories about these pachyderms.  There are more than four thousand tame elephants in Thailand but vets could not use stethoscopes made for cows and horses, they could not give them shots because regular hypodermic needles would not pierce their two-inch skin and there were no X-ray machines that were large enough to take gigantic pictures of the problem.  Besides this, pharmacies would have had to stock pills the size of grapefruit. The only solution was a special hospital just for these gigantic animals. Written in an easy-to-understand language and with full-color photographs that effectively illustrate the story, readers who areinterested in animals are sure to find this book both interesting and appealing.  Now where were we???? ....Why did the elephant...............
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

 Gibbons, Gail.  PIGS.  Illus. by the author.  New York: Holiday, 1999.  unp.
    0-8234-144-8; lib.bdg., $16.95.  98-28807    636.4

     This book dispels some myths about pigs such as they are smelly and dirty and "eat like pigs."   However, the diagram showing which  parts of the pig are suitable for eating,  reinforces the idea that ham and bacon are large portions of the pig.  The bacon and ham sections in the diagram are disproportionately larger than they should be.  There is a double page spread of eight common breeds of pigs, history of pigs, and lots of interesting information.   Many of the illustrations of the pigs throughout the book are stylistic rather than realistic.  The text is better than the illustrations which is not typical of books by Gibbons.  Perhaps this particular book would have been better served with photographs.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Richard Strieter, 25 years of experience as a hog farmer.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Grace, Catherine O'Neill.  I WANT TO BE A VETERINARIAN.   Illus. with photos.
    I Want To Be Series.  San Diego: Harcourt, 1997.  0-15-201296-6, hb., $16.00.
    0-15-201965-0, pb. $9.00   96-00215  Gr. 2-8+.    636.089

    Large, color photos showing vets in a variety of activities add  interest to this picture book about veterinary medicine..  Not all photos have captions and two of them are dark, but on the whole, they contribute to make  this an appealing book.   There is a balance of sexes and races in the photos.  Eleven photos are devoted to introducing famous veterinarians.  Photos also enhance ten vocabulary words. A useful list of 17 "Other Sources of Information" includes a variety of addresses about general information, conservation, wildlife, zoos, bird and marine societies, and 4-H clubs.  Black and white sketches and photos illustrate the double page spread on the history of veterinary science.   Dr. Engstrom, retired veterinarian, says "This book features large print and is very easy to understand and is a fast read.  The description of all the various fields of veterinary medicine are described  and I found that very interesting, especially the new fields of space and aquatics."  Dr. Engstrom approves of the book and says it is "Excellent for career planning"and for  "all those interested in animal science." and that he thinks it is appropriate for middle school through high school students "if they are mentoring or planning a pre-vet currriculum, I would require reading this book."
   Guest Reviewer:   David Engstrom, DVM;  Veterinarian for almost 40 years
 
Larson, Kirby and Mary Nethery.  TWO BOBBIES: A TRUE STORY OF HURRICANE KATRINA, 
          FRIENDSHIP, AND SURVIVAL.  
Illus. by Jan Cassels.  New York:  Walker & Company, 2008. 
          16p. ISBN: 9780802797544 hb. $16.99.  Gr. K-2   j636.08

Many stories of courage and human kindness have been reported from the catastrophic hurricane Katrina. This true story
of Bobbie and Bob, a dog and cat alone and abandoned durring the storm and it's aftermath is valuable to children on two levels. 
It depicts the devastation and desperation to the city, people and animals with text and illustrations on a child's level and tells the 
story of Bobbie and Bob's friendship and struggle to survive. Heartwarming and satisfying.
 Barb Ward, Children's Librarian Dickinson County Library, Retired

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636.1 PETS: HORSES

Lauber, Patricia.  THE TRUE-OR-FALSE BOOK OF HORSES.
    Illus. by Rosalyn Schanzer.  New York: HarperCollins , 2000.  32p. 0-688-16919-8;
    hb., $15.95  0-688-16920-1; lib.bdg., $15.89     Gr. 1-5+     636.1

    Fourteen questions are asked about horses in this picture book. Although the words true and false are not used in the answer, there is always a clear sentence so readers will understand the answer.  Questions are answered in several paragraphs and explanatory pictures.  For example, “A Horse’s Teeth are Clues to Its Age” shows a half page of a man looking into a horse’s mouth along with a paragraph explaining “why teeth are a good clue to the age of a horse.”  Four pictures show incisors at various stages and there is another picture shows a cross section of a skull with incisors and molars.  All illustrations are colorful and well placed on each page, making this an attractive and informative book.  Other questions deal with hearing, sleeping, solving math problems, speed, and walking on tiptoe.  The introduction is about horses and people through the ages.  You don’t have to be a horse lover to enjoy this book but horse lovers of all ages will devour it.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Terri Strieter, Bay Port, MI  Horsewoman for 50 years.
    *Editor’s Note: Terri is a 4-H leader and former advisor to the Horse Bowl Team, Laker High School, Pigeon, MI

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636.7 PETS: DOGS

Dolbear, Emily J. and E. Russell Primm.  DOGS HAVE PUPPIES.  Illus. with photos.  
    Animals and their Young Series.  Minneapolis:  Compass Point, 2001.  24p.
    0-7565-0060-5; lib.bdg., $18.60   Gr. K-2   636.7

    The full color photos opposite each page of text add interest to the book.  Primary students learn what happens before and after puppies are born, what they eat, why they are different colors, and what happens when they grow up.  There is a glossary of four terms, and four sentences in a section called "Did You Know?"  In another section called Author Information and a brief index appear on the last page.  The sentences are simple, but not simplistic, and will provide beginning readers with information about dogs.  There is no information about ownership or responsibility towards having a dog.  However, the information that is provided is interesting and adds to the knowledge of children and even adults.  This is a good series book for school and public libraries and the photo of two West Highland Terriers on the front cover will entice potential readers to pick up the book.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

George, Jeanne Craighead. HOW TO TALK TO YOUR DOG. Illus.by Paul Meisel. New York: 
    HarperCollins, 2000.  28p. 0-06-027092-6 hb.$11.95    Gr. K-5+   636.7

    When this reviewer couldn’t get her new puppy to stop bossing her around, she re-read Jean George’s JULIE OF THE WOLVES (Harper, 1972) to remember how to tell the puppy “I am the leader of this pack.”  Now, in simple language, George tells readers of all ages how to talk to their dog through words and body language.  It’s never to late to apply this book to your dog but this reader wished she had read it before acquiring her puppy. George covers a variety of subjects well: when to take a pup home; how to replace his mother love with you; how to praise him; how dogs say hello and good-by; how to say “I am boss; ” how to play; using body language towards friends and enemies; learning about scent; talking with your eyes; and the meaning of dog voices.    Photos of George are included along with drawings of the dogs.  This book is informative and fun and will please dog lovers of all ages.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Trumbauer, Lisa.  Gail Saunders-Smith, Ed.  POODLES.  Mankato, MN:
      Capstone Press, 2005.  24 p.  ISBN: 0736853359 hb.  $11.95  Gr. K-1   j636.72

       The poodle, a popular dog breed, is described in simple text and color photographs.  Repetitive words encourage beginning readers, to whom this book is targeted.  More difficult words are described in the glossary.  The photographs support the short sentences. Chapters include:  Show Dogs, From Puppy to Adult and Poodle Care.  The book also includes a Read More section, Further Reading FactHound.com internet site, Index and Note to Parents and Teachers.  In only 24 pages, this book covers the unique traits and basic care of the poodle.  This book would also be good for toddlers who love dogs.
        Denise Engel, Director, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Wilcox, Charlotte.  THE COLLIE.  Mankato, MN: Capstone High/Low, 1999.  48p.
    Learning about Dogs Series.  0-7368-0005-0; lib.bdg., $ 14.00   98-06581      Gr. 3+     636.7

    The history and development of the breed and tips about owning a collie are shared by Wilcox who "has judged collies and written articles about them."   "This is a good beginner's book for someone who wants general information about collies or for information for anyone interested in buying a collie," Heidtman says.   Every time the reader opens the book, there is a clear photo of collies on one of the pages.  All of the photos are in color except two which are about Lassie from the movie and 1954 TV show.   "I love the pictures which show all colors (except pure white) and both coats collies come in," Heidtman says.  Knight's LASSIE and Terhune's LAD are mentioned as contributors to the popularity of the breed.   Create an instant library display with this book and books and videos about Lassie and Lad.  Although intended  for children, the book will also appeal to adults.  Because many people have dogs and the vocabulary is reasonably easy, the whole series will be useful for adult literacy programs.  If a library can't afford all of the 14 books in this series, this one should be considered because of  the literary connection and popular appeal of the breed.   Although Wilcox warns readers about the eye problem in several places in the book so potential owners know to ask breeders about the eye problem, Heidtman says "You can't emphasize enough  the importance of knowing that the collie people purchase has good eyes.  Wilcox says  ‘Breeders can tell new owners how to care for their collie's eyes.'  This statement sounds like the problem is on the outside, not in back of the eye by the optic nerve."   Wilcox also says ‘Owners should not bathe their collies more than once every two months.'  but "If they need a bath, they need a bath.  I give baths every week when I show them."  Wilcox's point about over-bathing collies; however, is well taken."   Despite these comments, Heidtman says   "This is a very basic, good beginner's book...I liked how the author added quick facts about dogs, words to know, Internet sites, and useful addresses."
      Guest Reviewer:  Debbie Heidtman; Blue Ridge Collies, Skandia, MI,  Collie breeder and  handler since 1989

Wilcox, Charlotte.  THE SIBERIAN HUSKY.  Illus.with photos.  Learning about Dogs Series.
    Mankato, MN: Capstone High/Low, 1999.  48p.  0-7368-007-7 hb. $14.25.    Gr. 2+   636.7

    Wilcox provides a wealth of information about Siberian Huskies: physical description; development of the breed; role in the Diphtheria serum run from Anchorage to Nome on the Iditarod Trail;  sled dog racing including the Iditarod; ownership tips; and a glossary of terms.  A bibliography, useful addresses, and Internet sites (including the John Beargrease Sled Dog Marathon in MN) are helpful additions.  The quick facts about dogs appears in all books in this series.  Other breeds in the series include: Beagles; Bulldogs; Cocker Spaniels; Collies; Dalmatians; Doberman Pinschers; German Shepherds; Golden Retrievers; Great Danes; Irish Setters; Labrador Retrievers; Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards.  Libraries will wish to purchase as many of the books in this series as they can afford but this particular title is an essential purchase for Upper Peninsula libraries who are located near the UP 200 and Midnight Run Sled Dog Championship race.
    Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Wood, Ted.  BEAR DOGS: CANINES WITH A MISSION.  New York: Walker, 2001.  32p.  
    ISBN0-8027-8758-4; hb., $16.95  0-8027-8759-2; lib.bdg. $17.85     Gr. 2-9     636.73

    Carrie Hunt, a biologist at Glacier National Park, Montana uses Karelian bear dogs (from a region of Finland called Karelia) to scare bears away from human habitations.  Since 1990 Carrie has been teaching these black and white dogs to bark at bears and chase them away.  Bears are attracted to campsites, trash cans, and cars that contain food.  Once bears lose their fear of humans, they are a danger to humans and must be destroyed.  In 1995 Carrie started the Wind River Bear Institute and the Partners in Life program.  The address, in case readers want to contribute “part of your allowance to help support these dog heroes” is discretely in small print at the end of the book with the bibliographical and cataloging information.  A photo of Carrie and her first dog, Cassie, who died in 1999, is also on that page.  The dogs look like Huskies or Border Collies.
    The photos throughout the book are in color and are consistently clear.  The photos show the dogs in training, the dogs in action with bears, and visiting schools.  In one summer, the dogs saved 29 grizzly bears and 39 black bears from being destroyed.   Working dog books are popular and these dogs are virtually unknown even though they provide a valuable service.  Campers will learn from a page called “How to Keep a Good Bear Good” which gives 7 rules for in camp and 3 rules for hikers.  This book will appeal to dog lovers of all types, campers, and areas of the country that have large Finnish populations like Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and Minnesota.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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636.8 PETS: CATS

Blackaby, Susan.  A CAT FOR YOU:  CARING FOR YOUR CAT.  Illus. by Charlene DeLage.
    Pet Care series. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Picture Window Books, 2003. 24p.
    ISBN: 1-4048-0115-4; lib. bdg., $15.95.   PreK-3.

    The illustrations are ink sketches painted with water color.  Without being very specific or detailed, this book outlines the basics of pet care for a cat in a very matter of fact manner, i.e. "Cat food has the things your cat needs to stay healthy."  "Give your cat plenty of fresh water." "Train your cat to use a litter box."  It could serve as a very elementary reference book on cat care.  The style of type might make this book challenging for a beginning reader.  Not really recommended.
    Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Board of Directors

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636.9 PETS: --- OTHER

Darling, Kathy.  THE ELEPHANT HOSPITAL. Photos by Tara Derling.  Brookfield, CT : Millbrook, 2002.  
          40p. 0-7613-1723-6; lib.bdg.,  $22.90     Gr. 3-5    636.9

          Why do elephants have wrinkled legs?  Give up?  (From tying their tennis shoes too tight!)............
Why do elephants have pointed tails?  Don't know? (from standing too close to the pencil sharpener!)  
How do you take care of a sick elephant??   Take him to The Elephant Hospital.  And this is no joke!!  
In 1994 the world's first Elephant Hospital was created in Thailand.  Darling describes the work of doctors and 
volunteers in just such a hospital and relates individual stories about these pachaderms.  There are more than four 
thousand tame elephants in Thailand but vets could not use stethoscopes made for cows and horses, they could not 
give them shots because regular hypodermic needles would not pierce their two-inch skin and there were no X-ray 
machines that were large enough to take gigantic pictures of the problem.  Besides this, pharmacies would have had 
to stock pills the size of grapefruit. The only solution was a special hospital just for these gigantic animals. Written in 
an easy-to-understand language and with full-color photographs that effectively illustrate the story, readers who are 
interested in animals are sure to find this book both interesting and appealing.  
          Patricia Fittante; Childrenís Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Rockwell, Anne.  MY PET HAMSTER.  Illus by Bernice Lum.  Let’s Read-and-Find-Out
    Science series, Level 1.  New York: HarperCollins, 2002.  34p.  0-06-028564-8; hb.,
    $15.99     0-06-028565-6; lib.bdg., $17.89   2001-026481     PreS-Gr. 3     636.9

    Although this book has been given a Dewey Decimal number, it is really a story, told in the first person, by a little girl who received a hamster for her birthday present.  They bought the hamster and everything needed for it at a pet store.  Readers learn that about different types of hamsters, rodents, and pet care as well as that hamsters finish growing before humans.  The book could have ended here, but Rockwell adds a different element when she discusses different kinds of animals, tame and wild, and then discusses pets.  A page with the caption “Find Out More About Hamsters and Other Animals”  provides four related projects for children to investigate.  Despite the identity problems, this title provides good about a popular pet at a level young readers can understand.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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 641.5 FOOD AND COOKING

Bull, Jane.  THE COOKING BOOK: MOUTHWATERING MEALS AND SENSATIONAL SNACKS
     New York: Dorling Kindersley, 2002.  48p.  0-7894-8834-5; lib.bdg., $12.99     Gr. 3-8     641.5

    Few cookbooks for children are so appealing.  The boy on the title page is wearing a red shirt with a black and white checked apron and is holding a human sized spoon with something chocolate on it that readers will want to lick off the page.  Even the table of contents contains mouthwatering treats.  The book begins with safety tips, kitchen rules, measuring tips, and information about food types like energy food and treats and sweets.  The photos of the “cooking kit” are show objects like a peeler in action.  The book begins with a recipe and samples for play dough/bread dough.   Recipes are on two-page spreads and range from soup, tarts, upside down cake, fruit drinks, and a mud pie that is “to die for.”   The pages are filled with photos of tools, directions, and the finished products but do not appear cluttered.  The book ends with cooking words complete with illustrations and an index.  School and public libraries should not miss this one.  The mouthwatering pictures of the end product and clear directions will make this a popular title with kids and neophyte chefs of any age.  Hopefully, the binding will hold up under the constant use.    
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Cooper, Elisha.  ICE CREAM. Illus by author.  New York: Greenwillow/Harper, 2002. 32p.
    ISBN  0-06-001423-7; hb., $15.95  0-06-001424-5; lib.bdg., $15.89    Gr. K-3   637.4

    “It starts with a cow.  It starts with a lot of cows.”  So begins this picture book that shows the entire process of making ice cream.  After learning how cows are milked and the milk travels by truck to the factory, readers learn about the ice cream machine that “sits on the factory floor.  It is a steel, piston-pumping, cream dripping, gadget-whirring, water-spraying, pipe-rattling, chocolate-leaking animal.”  The author has a flair for describing the process and slips in extra information without fan fair; for example when describing the distribution process she mentions corner ice cream parlors “where the three-gallon tubs he delivers will be scooped into cones.”  The only unrealistic part is the ending when the ice cream truck delivers a few cartons to the farmer but it makes a humorous touch when “The farmer thanks him, then walks out to the field and eats ice cream with his cows.  Well, he lets them watch.”  Almost everyone likes ice cream so that provides motivation for readers of all ages.  The giant bowl of ice cream on the cover and the cows don’t hurt either.  This is a good book community helper units and is essential before a class trip to an ice cream factory.  This book makes readers want to reach for a dish of ice cream.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Fauchald, Nick.  ON-THE-GO SCHWARMAS AND OTHER MIDDLE-EASTERN DISHES.
               Illus. by Ronnie Rooney.  Minneapolis, MN:  Picture Window Books, 2009.  32p.
               ISBN 978-1-4048-5192-4 lib bdg. $18.99     Gr. 2-6     j641.5956

               Maybe itís time for your child to learn the finer points of following a recipe.  It couldnít be easier with a 
clear list of ingredients, list of tools, and step-by-step instructions - fully illustrated - with each recipe.  This book is 
part of a Kids Dish series covering recipes from around the world.  Each book is divided into easy, intermediate, and 
advanced dishes and includes a food pyramid, cooking tips, glossary, and index.  Some of the mouth-watering recipes
include Perfect Party Pita Chips, No Prob Kebabs, and Tasty Tabbouleh.  The layout of each page is also a feast for 
the eyes.  Highly recommended for anyone interested in cooking.
               Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Fauchald, Nick.  WRAP-N-BAKE EGG ROLLS AND OTHER CHINESE DISHES.
               Illus. by Ronnie Rooney.  Minneapolis, MN:  Picture Window Books, 2009.  32p.
               ISBN 978-1-4048-5183-2 lib bdg. $18.99     Gr. 2-6     j641.5951

               Maybe itís time for your child to learn the finer points of following a recipe.  It couldnít be easier with a 
clear list of ingredients, list of tools, and step-by-step instructions - fully illustrated - with each recipe.  This book is 
part of a Kids Dish series covering recipes from around the world.  Each book is divided into easy, intermediate, and 
advanced dishes and includes a food pyramid, cooking tips, glossary, and index.  Some of the mouth-watering recipes
include Birthday Noodles, Sichuan Bold Beans and Egg Drop Soup.  The layout of each page is also a feast for the 
eyes.  Highly recommended for anyone interested in cooking.
               Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Gerasole, Isabella and Olivia.  THE SPATULATTA COOKBOOK.  New York:  Scholastic, 2007.
          128p.  ISBN: 9780439022507; 0439022509  hb. $16.99.     Gr. 4 - 8      j641.5.

          If you're not familiar with the authors, Isabella & Olivia Gerasole, they were the youngest winners of the James Beard 
Foundation Award in 2006 and are hosts of the Spatulatta cooking website.  This cookbook for kids, by kids, contains over 
50 recipes arranged by seasons of the year, including vegetarian and snacks.  These recipes are made-from-scratch recipes 
using whole food ingredients.  Each dish is fully photographed with several smaller photographs showing steps in the process.  
Basic kitchen tools and skills are explained.  The wire binding allows the book to lie flat when open.  Children with some 
experience in the kitchen will be able to use this book easily and create a great meal.  Beginning cooks will need some help 
from a parent, but should be successful by following the instructions in this book.  Highly recommended for all libraries.
          Denise Engel, Director, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield , MI

Goldish, Meish. BUG-A-LICIOUS. New York: Bearpoint Publishing, 2009.24p.
          978-1-59716-757-4  lib.bdg.  $22.61   K-3    j641.696

          Grasshoppers for lunch? Dragonflies for dinner? Eeuw. With colorful images and some great photos of insect crackers, 
beetle pizza, and popcorn ants, BUG-A-LICIOUS is sure to be hit with young reluctant male readers. The text is easy to read 
and extra information on insect eating around the world is included as a dinner plate special in each section. The glossary isnít 
particularly useful, but there is an index and some suggested additional reading. A book created for younger readers, but because
of the subject matter will be popular through middle school. Also in this Extreme Cuisine series are BABY BUG DISHES, 
MAMMAL MENU, SHOCKING SEAFOOD, SLITHERY, SLIMY,SCALY TREATS, and SPIDER-TIZERS AND OTHER 
CREEPY TREATS.
          Debra Oyler, Calumet Public School Library, Calumet, MI

Levenson, George.  BREAD COMES TO LIFE.  Photography by Shmuel Thaler.  Berkeley, CA:
    Tricycle Press, 2004.  unp.  1-58246-114-7 hb.  $15.95   Gr. K-3    j641.8

    Everything you ever wanted to know about bread is found in this early elementary book.  Bread begins in the garden as wheat and goes through many steps on its way to a finished loaf of bread.  The photography is superb!  If you look closely, you will find the elusive baker in his white uniform.  There's an informational section on bread and its ingredients in the back.  This book has a companion video narrated by Lili Tomlin, but they are sold separately.  This book stands on its own.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Ray, Deborah Kogan. LILY’S GARDEN.  Brookfield, CT:  Roaring Brook/Millbrook, 2002. 32p.  
    ISBN 0-7613-1593-4 hb. $16.96   0-7613-2653-7 lib.bdg. $23.90      K-Gr. 3      641.3

    The book begins when “a box of juicy oranges arrived from Grandma and Grandpa” who have gone to live in California for a year.  The book consists of two side-by-side parts, the largest is a first person narrative from a unisex child who tells what it is like to live in Maine throughout the year.  There is a month listed on the bottom of each right hand page.  On the left hand page there is information about crops, some of which are in California where her grandparents are living for the season but most are in Maine.  The information about the crops appears in a sidebar on the left-hand page.
    The book has a Dewey Decimal number but the bulk of the narrative is more story-like than nonfiction.  This book is interesting but the book suffers from a split personality.  It is really a story.  The book ends in December when the grandparents return for the holidays to place the star on the Christmas tree.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Redman, Nina E.  FOOD SAFETY:  A REFERENCE HANDBOOK.  Santa Barbara:  ABC-CLIO, 2000.  
    317p.  Contemporary World Issues series.  1-57607-158-8; hb., $45.00    00-010427   Gr. 9-12+   363.19.

    This thorough investigation of food safety begins with a history and overview of food safety, a chronology of events (legislation and movements) from ancient to modern times, biographical sketches of eight scientists and activists,  facts and statistics about foodborne pathogenic microorganisms and natural toxins, listings of used and banned additives, an extensive directory of organizations, annotated bibliographies of print and nonprint resources, a glossary, and an index.   The section called "Bad Bug Book," contains the following information for each organism:  nature of the acute disease, diagnosis of human illness, associated foods, relative frequency of disease, complications, target population, foods analysis, selected outbreaks, education, and other resources for 24 micro-organisms and viruses like Salmonella, Escherichia Coli (E-Coli), and Hepatitis A.   Sue Scott, who teaches a high school commercial foods course, sees this book as a very organized and informative reference book for teenagers and adults but is disappointed with the lack of graphics and charts.
    GUEST REVIEWER:  Sue Scott, Negaunee High School, Neguanee, MI

Schroeder, Lisa Golden.  CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH COOKING.  Exploring History
    through Simple Recipes.  Illus with photos.  Mankato, MN:  Blue Earth/Capstone, 2001.
    32p.  0-7368-0603-2; lib.bdg., $22.60   00-036767    Gr. 2-8     641.59

    The books in the series begin with a metric conversion guide, kitchen safety, and labeled drawings of cooking equipment.  The series also intersperses history with the recipes.  The history section includes drawings, maps, newspaper cartoons, and old photos.    The recipes are accompanied by photographs of ingredients or of the inished product and with directions for making the food.  All books in the series include words to know, a bibliography, addresses to write to or visit, Internet sites, and an index.   Other books in this series published between 1999 and 2000 are:  AMERICAN INDIAN COOKING BEFORE 1500; CIVIL WAR COOKING:  THE CONFEDERACY; CIVIL WAR COOKING:  THE UNION; COLONIAL COOKING; COOKING ON NINETEENTH-CENTURY WHALING SHIPS; COOKING ON THE LEWIS AND CLARK EXPEDITION; COWBOY COOKING; NINETEENTH CENTURY LUMBER CAMP COOKING; OREGON TRAIL COOKING; PIONEER FARM COOKING; AND SOUTHERN PLANTATION COOKING.   These titles provide a human element to the various time periods by including history, recipes, and food customs.  School and public libraries should consider this series to complement the curriculum.
    This title includes information about the California Gold Rush, how people got to California, staking a claim, discovering gold, boomtowns, other ways to make money from the miners, spending money received from the gold, ethnic characteristics of the miners, and long-term effects of the gold rush on California.  Recipes include Switchel, Sea Biscuits, Campfire Beefsteaks, 18-Carat Hash, Blueberry-Peach Hand Pies, Hangtown Fry, Chop Suey, and Colache.   This title provides a human element to the California Gold Rush and is an excellent resource for intermediate and middle school students.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
 

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646 SEWING

Carlson, Laurie.  QUEEN OF INVENTIONS: HOW THE SEWING MACHINE CHANGED THE 
     WORLD
.  Brookfield, CT: Millbrook, 2003.  32p.   0-7613-2706-1; lib..bdg., $22.90      681.76

    A profusion of photos and drawings bring this topic to life.  Beginning with hand stitching that was vital to ships’ sails, Conestoga wagon covers, and clothing; Carlson shows the need for a mechanical device to speed up sewing production.  Although other inventors are briefly mentioned, most of the attention is given to Isaac Singer and how he mass produced, marketed, and sold the machines on installments.  The only exclusion is that there is no mention of sweatshops.  There is a list of seven books “For Further Reading,” three Internet sites, and a bibliography of five books.  All in all, this is an important inclusion for collections about inventions and industry.  It will also catch the interest of adults interested in sewing.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan
 

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650 MANAGEMENT

Schwartz, Stuart and Craig Conley.  BEING A LEADER.  Illus. with photos.  Job Skills Series.  Mankato, MN:  
    Capstone, 1998.  32p.  01-56065-715-4;  lib.bdg., $19.00.   Gr. 3-9    650.1

    Full page color photos of teens add much to this short book about leadership  for upper elementary and middle school students.  Because the students look like older teens, the book could be used with high school students who need succinct information.  A page is devoted to the following topics:   leaders on the job; setting goals; being dependable; listening skills; motivating others; understanding differences; explaining rules; being fair; solving problems; dealing with emergencies; and personal leadership.  A glossary, list of three other books to read, useful addresses, Internet sites, and an index take one page each.  Other books in this series include: COMMUNICATING WITH OTHERS; TAKING RESPONSIBILITY, and WORKING AS A TEAM.  Purchase this book for individual or group student use.  School library media-specialists should bring this book to the attention of the student council advisor.  Public libraries should have the book for groups like scouts and 4-H.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
 
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670 MANUFACTURING

Carlson, Laurie.  QUEEN OF INVENTIONS: HOW THE SEWING MACHINE
    CHANGED THE WORLD.  Brookfield, CT: Millbrook, 2003.  32p.
    0-7613-2706-1; lib..bdg., $22.90      681.76

    A profusion of photos and drawings bring this topic to life.  Beginning with hand stitching that was vital to ships’ sails, Conestoga wagon covers, and clothing; Carlson shows the need for a mechanical device to speed up sewing production.  Although other inventors are briefly mentioned, most of the attention is given to Isaac Singer and how he mass produced, marketed, and sold the machines on installments.  The only exclusion is that there is no mention of sweatshops.  There is a list of seven books “For Further Reading,” three Internet sites, and a bibliography of five books.  All in all, this is an important inclusion for collections about inventions and industry.  It will also catch the interest of adults interested in sewing.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan
 
Koscielniak, Bruce.  JOHANN GUTENBERG AND THE AMAZING PRINTING PRESS.  
    Boston, MA:  Houghton Mifflin Co., 2003.  0-618-26351-9 hb.  $16.00   Gr. 3-6   682.2

    The story of modern printing techniques begins in the fifteenth century Germany, but the real story is thought to begin in China almost two thousand years ago.  The author also covers bookmaking and the mechanical details of building Gutenberg's printing press.  The illustrations bring the printed text to life.  This book is recommended for public and school libraries.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

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672 METALWORKING -- IRON/STEEL

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674 LUMBER PROCESSING

Crowe, William S.  LUMBERJACK: INSIDE AN ERA IN THE UPPER PENINSULA
    OF MICHIGAN.  3rd ed.  Ed. By Lynn M. Emerick and Ann M. Weller.  Skandia, MI:
    North Country Publishing, 2002.  144p.    Northco@up.net   1-866-942-7898
    0-9650577-3-9; pb., $19.95   2002-104698    Gr. 8-12+    634.9

    This 50th anniversary edition was prepared by the author’s granddaughters to tell about the white pine era from the late 1800s to the early 1900s.  The author worked in the Upper Peninsula for the Chicago Lumbering Co. and Weston Lumber Co. and later purchased a lumber company in 1912, the Consolidated Lumber Co.
    Fourth grade teachers of Michigan History will appreciate sharing the 40 historical photographs, the U.P. map, and the glossary with their students when they are studying the lumber era.   Fourth graders will also be interested in the comparison of cowboys to lumberman and logging marks to cattle brands.  Fourth grade teachers will need to read the bulk of the book, originally articles, and share pertinent information with their students because the book is beyond the scope of most fourth graders.  Middle and high school students and adults interested in the logging era can read the book for themselves.  Thankfully the information presented here was not lost to future generations.
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center

Yanuck, Debbie L. CARPENTERS.  Commuity Helpers series.  Mankato, MN:  Bridgestone/Capstone Books, 2002.
     24p   0-7368-1126-5; lib.bdg., $18.60    2001-003327    Gr. 1-2    694.092

    How times have changed!  Not only does the cover of this book feature a woman in the role of carpenter, but half the photographs in the book do as well.  This title is a simple introduction to what carpenters do, where they work and the kinds of tools they use.  The brilliant photographs reflect the information on the printed side of the page in a visual way.  Perfect for a unit on careers and occupations, but also a fun lap-read.  A great addition to help build a community helpers collection!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

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