Snow Books

Snow Picture Books

Arnold, Katya.  THE ADVENTURES OF SNOWMAN: A WINTER TALE
    BASED ON A STORY BY VLADIMIR GRIGORIEVICH STUTEEV.
    Retold and illus. by Katya Arnold.   New York:  Holiday, 1998.  32p.
    0-8234-1390-X;  lib.bdg.,  $15.95    98-16227    PreS-Gr. 3       E
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    Children write a letter to Santa asking for a tree and Snow woman provides it.  Dog goes along to protect her during delivery but he runs off after a rabbit.  After snow woman melts, fox comes back to find dog who scares rabbit, sees the letter, and takes it.  The animals make Snow Woman again, but the letter is gone.  However, all ends well.   The illustrations,  outlined in black,  give this book a unique flavor. According to the last page,  Snow Woman is a character in Russian stories, films and Rimsky-Korsakov's opera The Snowmaiden.   Suteev was a Russian  artist, writer, and movie director.  If you are looking for a holiday book from a different culture, consider this book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Barrett, Mary Brigid.  SNOW BABY.  Illus by Eve Chwast. New York:  Harcourt/Red Wagon,
    1998.  12p.   0-15-201054-8; bd.bk., $5.95.  96-075966.   PreS- K       BB.

    Barrett's book is a must for young children who live in snow country. Gram comes to take baby out to play in the snow.  Baby is bundled up and ventures out into the snow covered world with Gram. They climb up hills, make snow angels, go sledding, and baby plops in a drift.  At day's end, the wind howls outside, while baby and Mama are nice and warm inside, blowing goodby kisses to Gram.  Rhyme, repetition, and bright bold illustrations make this a fun board book to read again and again. This book is bound to be a favorite of babies to preschool children who live in areas like the Upper Peninsula.
    Betty Karbon, Munising School and Public Library, Munising, MI.

Beck, Ian.  TEDDY’S SNOWY DAY.  Illus by the author.  New York:  Scholastic, 1998,
    2002.  32p.  0-439-17520-8; hb., 15.95     99-047802     PreS-K     E

    Lily and her Teddy look out the window and want to go out and play but mother suggests that Teddy stay inside.  When Teddy is sitting on the windowsill, mother closes the window, he falls outside where he enjoys himself while slipping on a plank of wood, and snowboarding down a steep hill, making a snowbear, and sliding on the ice.  When Teddy becomes lost, he is saved by someone whose red mittens and white cuff are the only part of him that is seen.  Children will enjoy being in on the joke.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Carr, Jan.  FROZEN NOSES.  Illus. by Dorothy Donohue.  New York: Holiday, 1999.
    32p. 0-8234-1462-0; hb.,   $15.95     98-48540     Pres-Gr. 2    E

    This catchy rhyme about ordinary winter activities like making a snowman, sledding, and skating is excellent for reading aloud to preschool and early elementary children.  Choose a few of the collage illustrations to grace winter bulletin board or as patterns for children, intermediate and above,  to make faces or whole bodies of children in action.  Upper peninsula children can identify with the children as they get ready to go outdoors:   "Frozen noses/ Tingly toeses/ Sniffle, snuffle Winter's Cold!/ Better Bundle!/ Quiver, shiver/ Booted, bucked/ Buttonholed."   Carr's book is a good choice for public and school libraries and day care centers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Cuyler, Margery. THE BIGGEST, BEST SNOWMAN.  Illus. by Will Hillenbrand.
    New York:  Scholastic, 1998.  32p.  0-590-13922-3; hb., $15.95   PreS-Gr.2      E

    Little Nell lives with Big Mama, Big Sarah, and Big Lizzie in a Big snowy woods.  No matter what Little Nell wants to do, the others say she is too little.  So Nell goes out in the snow to play with her friends, Reindeer, Hare, and Bear Cub who help her make a BIG snowman. Winter birds; Crow, Cardinal, and Sparrow,  help put on the face.  When her family sees Nell's snowman they are astounded and Big Mama says Nell can help make a Big lunch.  Because of its big size, the book can be used for reading aloud to a large group.   The story can be read just for fun or to introduce woodland birds and animals, but for that purpose, it would have been better to have a white tail deer instead of a reindeer.  Also use the book to introduce opposites; big and little.  There is enough repetition here so beginning readers can read it with some help.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center,  Marquette, MI

Edwards, Richard.  COPY ME, COPYCUB.  Illus. by Susan Winter.  New York:
    HarperCollins, 1999.  unp.  0-06-028570-2; hb.,  $14.95   99-1175      PreS-Gr. 3     E

    The watercolor illustrations in this picture book are a perfect complement to a warm story about a cub who copies everything his mother does; he is a copycub.  Copycub follows his mother as the seasons change until it begins to snow.  His mother wants him to follow her to a warm cave where they can spend the winter but Copycub is so numb and cold that he can't keep up and lies down to sleep.  Mother gently urges him to follow her step by step until they reach the cave where they can snuggle until spring.  Before reading this book aloud to children, show them the front cover and snowy end papers and ask them to predict what will happen in the story.   This gentle book has several layers; it is a book of mother love, changing seasons, and hibernation.  Schools or agencies who provide classes on parenting will find this book invaluable to show how parents are role models for children.    This book is as perfect for a preschool lapsit program as it is for a primary school science unit.  When read aloud at a pre-school story hour or at home as a bedtime story, children can chime in and be a copycub.  This versatile book will fit into any school, public, or home library. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ehlet, Lois.  SNOWBALLS.  San Diego: Harcourt, 1995.  32p. 0-15-20074-7; hb.,
    $16.00   0-15-202095-0; pb.,  $7.00    94-47183      PreS-Gr.3       E

    Teachers will welcome the paperback edition of this favorite picture book for their classroom collections.  By now all school and public libraries in snow belt states will already own a hardback copy of this magnificent book.  The collage illustrations showing the birch trees, birds, and photos of "good stuff"  for making a snow family are bright and colorful.  There is even information about what makes snow and that it melts.  This is an excellent book for sharing with a group because by holding the book longways, viewers have a good look at the snow dad, snow mom, snow boy, snow girl, snow baby, snow cat, and snow dog.   Using paper plates and "good stuff," kids can try their own hand at making snow people. Don't miss this one.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Ford, Christine.  SNOW!  Illus.by Candace Whitman.  New York: HarperFestival,
    1999.  24p.  0-694-01199-1; hb., $9.95.    98-72313     PreS-Gr. 1     E

    Six stages of color coding on the back cover indicate age levels from newborns to children ages 3 and up to help purchasers make gift selections.  This book is labeled for ages 2 and up.  Because the rhyme concludes on the last end paper where date due cards for computer check-out are often placed, the book is more suitable for personal rather than library collections.  However, the catchy rhyme could be read aloud during preschool story hour programs if the group is small.  The watercolor illustrations are soft and inviting.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Glaser, Linda.  IT’S WINTER.  Illus by Susan Swan.  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  32p.
    0-7613-1759-7; lib.bdg., $21.90     0-7613-1680-9; pb.   2001-044771   PreS-Gr. 3     E

    The brightly colored collage illustrations enhance a rhyme that shows a girl and her dog making footprints, snow angels, and a snowman and snow lady.  When she gets a postcard from her grandparents in Florida, the book changes direction and readers see animals in areas up north that she can’t see who are hibernating and others who are surviving winter like deer and birds.  A list of nature activities concludes the book.  Libraries owning other books in the series---IT’S FALL! (2001) and IT’S SPRING! (2001) will want this one too.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Henkes, Kevin.  OH!  Illus by Laura Dronzek.  New York: Greenwillow, 1999.  24p.
    06; hb., $15.00   01700544; lib.bdg., $14.93     9851890   PreS - Gr. 3     E

    The animals that play in the new snow with children are: squirrel, rabbit, cat, dog, and birds.  This title is good for sight reading the word "Oh" for even the youngest child.  The cardinals are called birds but can be identified as cardinals for children when the book is read aloud to them.  This cozy book ends with children returning to a cozy house.  School and public libraries needing easy to read picture books will purchase this book which is an essential purchase in schools where the elementary curriculum includes the study woodland biomes.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Hines, Anna Grossnickle.  WHAT CAN YOU DO IN THE SNOW?  Illus. by
    Thea Kliros.  New York:  Greenwillow,  1999. 20p.  0-6880160078-6; bd.bk,
    $5.95.    98-13383  PreS-Gr.1     BB

     Eight suggestions for playing in the snow are given in simple sentences with an "understood" subject, a verb, and a direct object except for the last one which is "Slide!" Some suggestions are "Stamp a trail," "Hear the quiet," and  "Throw a snowball."  Different children appear in each double spread and all are Caucasian except for an African American boy and an Asian girl.  The illustrations are descriptive and appealing.  The book will make a useful addition to preschool story hours featuring snow books because it can be used for narrative pantomiming.  After reading the book, the adult leader can ask the children to mime the activities while the book is read a second time.  Children will have to be reminded that, because of space limitations, all activities will have to be mimed while standing up, especially "Swoosh an angel."    Other books in the series are WHAT CAN YOU DO IN THE RAIN?   WHAT AN YOU DO IN THE WIND?  and WHAT CAN YOU DO IN THE SUN?  Use all four books to stimulate discussion of other activities that can be accomplished in various types of weather.   Purchase the books for listening pleasure, beginning reading, or for science enrichment.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Inkpen, Mick.  KIPPER'S SNOWY DAY.  Illus. by the author.  San Diego:  Red Wagon/Harcourt,
    1996.  unp.  0-15-201362-8; hb., $14.00  0-15-202303-8; pb., $5.95  95-47126   PreS-Gr. 2.     E

    Two delightful dogs are excited about the snow and go out to make tracks and snow angels/dogs, have a snowball fight, and build a snowman.  The two dogs romp and play until their shadows become long.  That sounds ordinary but what is unique is that Tiger, an unlikely but humorous name for the second dog, can't get up from making his snow angel/dog and rolls down the hill, making a snowball as he rolls.  The repetition of the words "silly, woolly clothes"  that Tiger and eventually the snowman wear, is just one of the aspects that makes this book easy to read for second graders.  Although the language is at times poetic, it is still easy to read.  Before Kipper makes paw prints in the new snow, it is "like an empty page waiting to be scribbled on."  The "huge cotton ball snowflakes" can easily be reproduced on a bulletin board or for an art project.  Primary teachers will want the paperback for their room collections.   Use the book to teach similes and metaphors.  First published in Great Britain, this book traveled the Atlantic well. Kids may know Kipper and Tiger from Nick Jr. on Nickelodeon.  Even if  Kipper is unfamiliar, he grows on readers who will want to read other books about him.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Johnson, Crockett.  HAROLD AT THE NORTH POLE:  A CHRISTMAS JOURNEY
    WITH THE PURPLE CRAYON.  Illus. by the author.  New York:  HarperCollins, 1957, 1958.
    unp.  0-06-028073-5; hb., $12.95.  0-06-028073-5;  lib.bdg., $2.89    58-6614   PreS-Gr.2     E

    Harold needs a Christmas tree on Christmas Eve so he sets off to the woods at night and makes a moon and stars, snow, snowman, the North Pole complete with Santa coming out of the chimney, reindeer, and a sleigh filled with toys.  Then he had to make his tree so Santa could come and put presents under it.  Fans of Harold will love this reprint of a holiday favorite and will want to draw along with him.  Purchase to replace worn copies or to round out holiday collections in school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Josse, Barbara M.  SNOW DAY!  Illus. by Jennifer Plecas.  New York: Clarion, 1995.  32p.
    0-395-96890-9; pb., $5.95.    K-Gr. 3       E

    Robby and his dog Zippy are ecstatic when neither the snow plow nor the school bus can get through the snow.  Robbie gets his younger sister, Louise, to join him in making snow angels while Zippy makes a snow dog.  His older sister, Heather, is less enthusiastic until she sees her parents and younger brother and sister engaged in a snowball fight and goes out to join the women's side.  Cocoa with marshmallows in front of the fire is a satisfying end to the story.  The watercolor, gouache, colored pencil, and pastel illustrations add to the charm of this book. The author and illustrator have taken an ordinary event and made it into a delightful picture book.  The dog adds a special dimension through words and illustrations.  This book is an essential purchase in "snow belt" states and a good choice for school and public libraries in the rest of the world.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Joyce, William.  SNOWIE ROLIE.  Illus by author.  New York:  Geringer/Harper, 2000.  40p.
    0-06-029285-7; hb., $15.95   0-06-029286-5; lib.bdg., $15.89  00-28119  PreS-Gr. 2    E

    “Rolie Polie Olie lived in a land where it never snowed.”  Then one day it did and Olie and Zowie built a snowman.  What do you do when your snowman friend starts to melt?  Take him to Chillsville where Klanky Klaus lives, of course; even if it is hard to say goodby.  The book ends satisfactorily when they find a present where their friend Snowie once stood.  Fans of TV’s “Playtime Disney” will enjoy reading about their friends.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

McGeorge, Constance W.  SNOW RIDERS.  Illus. by Mary Whyte.  San Francisco: Chronicle,
    1995.  32p.   0-8118-0873-4; hb. $13.95   8-8118-2464-0; pb.     94-47214    K-3    E

    Molly, who likes horses as much as the author of this book, and her younger brother spend their day off from school making many snow horses.  That night, when they look at their creations in the moonlight, the horses come to life.  You don't have to be a horse lover to enjoy this book.  The story and illustrations stir the imagination.  The end papers add a frosty touch to the book. This is a different type of snow book to add to school and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Martin, Bill, Jr. THE TURNING OF THE YEAR. Illus by Greg Shed.  San Diego:
    Harcourt, 1999.  unp.   0-15201085-8; hb., $15.00    96-53078    PreS-Gr     E

    Gouache illustrations bring the twelve couplets to life; there is one for each month of the year.   Although the book is not large, the illustrations fill the page so that it could be used for reading aloud to small groups of children.  The boy, girl, and the dog obviously enjoy each month which could lead adults to find out which month is the favorite one of readers and why.  Teachers will use the book to teach the months of the year and to encourage couplet writing, public librarians will want to use it for story times throughout the year, and parents will want to add it to their home picture book library.   Martin's book is especially appealing to Upper Peninsula children because they can identify with the scenes, especially fall and winter.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Nagel, Karen Berman.  SNOW?  LET’S GO!  Illus by Carolyn Croll.  My First Hello Reader
    series, level 2. New York:  Scholastic  Cartwheel, 2000.  32p.  0-439-09906-4; pb., $3.99.
    99-30154     K-Gr. 2     ER

    The paperback format makes this easy reader accessible for home and classroom use.  Reading the few words per page, learners read about clothing necessary to wear out in the snow.  The humorous ending and rhyming text make the book fun to read.  The flash cards in the middle of the book can be removed for word recognition of winter clothing.  There are activities at the end of the book that include identifying rhyming words and items that are not winter clothing, finding pictures that do not belong in a winter scene, and placing items of clothing in the order they should be put on.  Answers appear on the last page.   Because of the potential for writing in the book and loosing the flash cards, this book is recommended for library use only if it is encased in a plastic checkout bag.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Neitzel, Shirley.  I’M NOT FEELING WELL TODAY.  Illus by Nancy Winslow Parker.
    Greenwillow, 2001.  32p.  0-688-17380-2; hb., $15.95  0-688-17381-0; lib.bdg.,
    $15.89   00-021917   K-Gr. 3.  E

    Fans of Neitzel and Winslow who liked THE JACKET I WEAR IN THE SNOW  (Harper 1995) and THE BAG I’M TAKING TO GRANDMA’S (Harper, 1989) will find the format similar, tied together with the checkerboard frame for the front cover.  The watercolors, accented with pencil and black pen, are perfect for the text and enhance it by providing rebuses once the words (box of tissues, blanket, pillow, and [finger] puppets) have been introduced.  Ten essential items are needed  “since I’m not feeling well today.”  The cumulative story would be fine by itself but the ending elevates it to a new level by interjecting humor and surprise.  After the whole litany of things needed by someone who is ill, the boy jumps out of bed once he learns that a storm has caused school to be closed.  The final dance of the boy on the last page accompanies the text “That is too bad! Hurrah!  Hurrah!  I’m glad I’m feeling well today!
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Ryder, Joanne.  WILD BIRDS.  Illus by Susan Estelle Kwas.  New York:  Harper, 2003.  32p.
    0-06-027738-6; hb., $16.99  0-06-027739-4; lib.bdg., $17.99    99-042218  PreS-Gr. 3     E

    Ryder’s trademark poetic text is significantly enhanced with Kwas’ illustrations as a variety of birds are introduced during several seasons.  When winter comes, a girl feeds chickadees, makes bird angels in the snow, and soars in her dreams.  The total package, including the end papers, celebrates birds.  There are six feathers identified on the outside back cover as well as one unidentified one.  This is an important purchase for all types of libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Root, Phyllis.  GRANDMOTHER WINTER.  Illus. by Beth Krommes. Boston:  Houghton
    Mifflin, 1999.  unp.   0-395-88399-7; hb., $15.00.   98-50515     PreS-Gr. 3      E

    Bold scratchboard illustrations enhance this story about what happens when Grandmother Winter shakes her feather quilt and snow falls.  Readers learn how children, adults, birds, fish, animals, and an assortment of wildlife react.  The book is a combination of factual information about how animals prepare for winter and the fantasy of goose feathers as snow.  There is no trolley aka Mr. Rogers to separate fact from make believe but the figurative language prepares readers when Grandmother gathers feathers, soft as snowflakes, and stuffs them in her quilt.  The story has a folktale like quality and the illustrations are handsome.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Sams, Carl R. and Jean Stoick.  STRANGER IN THE WOODS.   Illus with photos.
    Milford, MI:  Carl R.  Sams II Photography, 2000.  46p.    0-9671748-0-5; 19.95
    99-95162    PreS Gr3+     E        1-800-552-1867   www.carrlsam.com

    The color photos of wildlife in the woods are definitely the focal point of this picture book and are uniform in quality throughout the book.   Even the end papers are different double spreads of a deer looking at a snowman, which provides the answer to the question “Who is the stranger in the woods?”   The text is less engaging although some of it is artistically draped within the pages.   The animals announce:  “Stranger in the Woods!”   They wonder what it could be.   When they see the snowman, the animals have to decide who will take a closer look and when the deer does so, they discover that the snowman is made up of good things to eat.   Children peek out of the evergreens (they must have been downwind) and decide to replenish the eyes, nose, and mouth (carrots, nuts, and corn) after they have been eaten by the animals.  A recipe for a snowman is included at the end of the book.
    Use this book to introduce woodland animals:  bluejay, snowy owl, deer, mourning doves, beaver, squirrel, porcupine, rabbit, chickadee, mouse, and cardinal.   This book is good for studying winter and the woodland biome.  Because the photos are of real animals and the dialogue is anthropomorphic, the caption at the top of the book, “A Photographic Fantasy,” should be explained to children.  This is a solid purchase, especially in areas with lots of trees and lots of snow.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Scheidl, Gerda Marie.  CAN WE HELP YOU, SAINT NICHOLAS? Illus. by Jean-Pierrre
    Corderoc'h.  New York:  North-South, 1998.  32p.  1-55858-956-2;  pb., $6.96  92-05231
    Gr. PreS-Gr.3      E

    St. Nicholas is looking for children in the dark and gets lost.  This book isn't just about a lost Santa, it is about being helpful.  Owl shows St. Nick the way, mouse brings him a hazel nut, squirrel cracks it open, bear offers the warmth of his cave, and reindeer carries him so he will get there in time.  The animals offer to help next year too.  Use this book to introduce woodland animals;  however, substitute a white tail deer for a reindeer.   A note at the beginning tells why St. Nicholas is portrayed as the bishop of Myra.  If you don't have enough Christmas titles to meet the demand, consider this paperback.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Scheidl, Gerda Marie.  FLOWERS FOR THE SNOWMAN.  Illus by Jo'zef Wilkon.
    New York:  North-South, 1998.    unp.  0-7358-1007-9; pb.,  $6.95   88-4253
    Gr. K-3+       E

    Snowman wants to see flowers.  Rabbit says a cabbage stalk is not a flower, crow says it is a pine tree.  A city cat sees flowers in a street lamp.   Finally Snowman sees flowers in a greenhouse but he pays a price;  he melts.  Children take what is left of him and make a new snowman.  The experience is all worthwhile because now Snowman has memories of flowers.  This book is a charming,  unique, and a sophisticated  look at a Snowman.  The refrain,"Snowman dear, it's sad, I know, but since you're only made of snow, you'll never see the flowers grow," is catchy.  Read the book aloud, then discuss it with students of all ages.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Seuling, Barbara.  WINTER LULLABY.  Illus. by Greg Newbold.  San Diego:
    Browndeer/Harcourt, 1998.  unp.   0-15-201403-9; hb., $16.00.
    95-52259  K-Gr. 3     591.54   or     811     or     E

    This  rhyme questions where various wildlife go during the winter; the answer is on another double page spread, also illustrated with acrylics.  "When the breeze blows/the petals off the flowers,/where do the bees go?"/ "Inside their hives/till spring arrives."  There are questions and answers for snakes, mice, bats, ducks, fish, and people.  The last pages show a father reading to two children "Out of the storm,/where it is warm."     The story is suitable for antiphonal choral reading.  The teacher can ask the questions and the class can answer in unison,  six students can respond to the teacher, or six pairs of students can ask questions of each other.  Choral reading can liven up study about the changing of the seasons.   This is an informative and attractive book that should be available in school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Shulevitz, Uri.  SNOW.    Illus. by the author.  New York: Farrar, 1998.  unp.
    0-374-37092-3; $16.00    97-37257    K-3         E

     One snowflake falls in a gray city and a boy says "It's snowing."  But the adults, including those on the radio and television, negate the boy's reaction to the snowflakes.  But snowflakes don't listen to radio or watch TV so eventually a gray city becomes white.  This celebration of snow is illustrated in watercolors by an illustrator who won a Caldecott Medal and an Honor book citation for other titles.  Read this book aloud for the delicious words like swirling, twirling, and dancing.  Buy this book in places where there is lots of snow or in places that need to understand the wonder of snow.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Siddals, Mary McKenna. MILLIONS OF SNOWFLAKES.  Illus. by Elizabeth Sayles.
    Boston: Clarion, 1998.  25p. 0-395-71531-8; hb., $13.00    97-47733   PreS-Gr.1    E

    This brief rhyming story begins "One little snowflake/falls on my nose./It makes me shiver from my head to my toes." Then two, then three snowflakes melt on her tongue. Because the book goes up to five, it also serves as a counting book.  The story cleverly mentions other parts of the body because snowflakes also fall on her nose, eyes, and chin.  After reading the book aloud to lapsit children, ask them to find the parts of their body mentioned in the story.  During pre-school story hours children can pantomime the laughter, jumping, running, spinning, etc.  The small size makes it usable for only a small circle of children.  This is a fine addition to school, public, and home library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Spowart, Robin.  INSIDE, OUTSIDE CHRISTMAS.  Illus. by the author.  New York:
    Holiday, 1999.  unp.    0-8234-1370-5, hb $15.95.     97-41956      PreS-Gr.3     E

    Each double spread contains 2 rhyming gerunds preceded with the word "Inside" (left hand page) and "Outside" (right hand page).  Beginning readers can take their clues from the illustrations because each gerund is explained by the illustrations which pertain to Christmas activities that take place inside or outside the family home of these adorable mice. Inside mother and child mouse are making cookies "Inside cooking" and outside they are looking at toys through a store window "Outside looking".  Primary teachers will use this book during holiday time to introduce opposites and to stimulate students to generate more "ing" words.  Beginning readers will enjoy "reading" a picture book by themselves.  School and public libraries should place this versatile holiday book on their Christmas lists.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Stafford, Liliana.   THE SNOW BEAR.  Illus by Lambert Davis.  New York:  Scholastic,
    2000.  32p. 0-439-26977-6; hb., $15.95.  00-06977-6    Gr. 1-3     E

    Bruun, an Inuit boy, saw the polar bear feed at the town dump.  She was alone because hunters had killed her cubs.  She was thin but the men who kept her in the bear-jail couldn’t feed her and she wouldn’t go away when released after the sea-ice froze over.  Bruun secretly fed the bear fish and soon he replaced her cubs in her heart.  When it was time to leave, the bear refused to go.  So Brunn took her into the wilderness but when he became lost, the bear offered warmth and brought food to the boy.  In spring, the bear tried to push away her boy but Bruun wouldn’t go.  Finally the bear led Bruun back to town but the boy was unhappy.  He went back to find the bear and asked her to take him back but she chased him away and he returned to the town.  When Brunn was grown, he went hunting in the old way and eventually he saw his snow bear who was now old and starving.  Because he knew she would not survive the summer, he was going to kill her with his harpoon but he couldn’t.  Brunn stayed until the bear died but she lived on in his memory when he told the story to his son.  The illustrations make the setting realistic.  This is a dichotomy because according to the “Author’s Note,” the relationship could not have happened because polar bears are wild animals.  This makes readers wonder why she wrote the book but her explanation is that the book “came in response to my searching for answers about nature, tradition, and the power of love.  I hope her story will stir others to do the same.”
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Stewart, Paul.  A LITTLE BIT OF WINTER.  Illus. by Chris Riddell.  New York:
    HarperCollins, 1998.  32p.    0-06-028278-9;  hb.,  $12.95.    PreS-Gr. 2      E

    First published in England, the book has a touch of British humor.  Rabbit tells Hedgehog that he will miss him but Hedgehog says he won't miss Rabbit because he will be asleep.  Hedgehog writes a message on the bark of a tree requesting rabbit to save "a little bit of winter" for him while he is hibernating.  Rabbit makes a huge snowball, wraps it in leaves, and stores it underground.  When spring comes and Hedgehog sees the soft, round, and brown ball, he does not understand because Rabbit had told him that winter was hard, white, and cold.  When the small snowball is revealed, Hedgehog understands what winter is like.  Use this book to stimulate the production of a vocabulary list which describes winter and another which lists animals that hibernate.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Weninger, Brigitte.  MERRY CHRISTMAS, DAVY!  Illus by Eve Tharlet.  Trans. by
    Rosemary Lanning.  New York:  Michael Neugebauer/North-South, 1998.  32p.
    1-55858-980-5; hb., $15.95    1-55858-981-3 lib.bdg., $15.88   98-06109     K-Gr.3     E

     Rabbit children talk about what Santa Claus expects them to do and sharing is one of the approved activities.  So Davy takes food to feed the birds without realizing that his family will not have enough to eat.   The family decides to be frugal until spring.  As a Christmas present, the birds bring a twig with berries and the promise of showing them where the berries grow in the summer; the deer gives a bundle of wheat, the squirrels bring mushrooms, and wild pig brings carrots and apples.. The book, first published in Switzerland, almost leaves the impression that it was written as a religious book but that Santa was inserted for Jesus to make it a secular title.  Nevertheless, the message of sharing is laudable and the messengers are appealing.  Buy it if it fits your needs.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Wilder, Laura Ingalls.  SUGAR SNOW.  Illus. by Doris Ettlinger.  My First Little House Books.
    Adapted from the Little House Books.  New York: HarperCollins, 1998.  32p.
    0-06-025932-9; hb., $12.95    0-06-025933-7; lib.bdg.,   $12.89  0-06-443571-7; pb.
    $5.95    97-14528    PreS-Gr. 3.    E

    Once upon a time, a little girl named Laura lived in the Big Woods of Wisconsin in a little house made of logs."  This is the beginning of a brief picture book which has been adapted from THE LITTLE HOUSE IN THE BIG WOODS.  The illustrations were inspired by those of Garth Williams in the first book of the famous series.  Readers listen with Laura and Mary to Pa's story about how Grandpa made maple sugar and why it is called a sugar snow.  This is a brief and handsome picture book.  There are two schools of thought about taking chapters of successful fiction and making them into picture books.  Does making a story accessible to a younger audience outweigh providing imagery for an audience instead of having them imagine it for themselves.  Even if library funds do not allow purchasing the myriad of other titles, librarians in the midwest or in areas where making maple sugar is part of a pioneer unit of study will wish to purchase this particular title.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center


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Snow Books -- Easy Readers

Hoban, Lillian.  SILLY TILLY'S VALENTINE.   Illus. by the author.  I Can Read Series.
    New York:  HarperCollins,  1998.  48p.   0-06-027400-X; hb.,  $14.95     0-06-027401-8;
    lib.bdg.,$14.89    0-06-4223-3; pb., $3.95    96-38239     Gr. 1-2          ER

     Silly Tilly and Mr. Mail-Mole make a snowman in this valentine story for beginning readers.   When her glasses become fogged, Tilly thinks the valentines the wind is blowing around are colored snowflakes. When Tilly slips in the snow, Mr. Mail-Mole thinks she is making snow angels.  There is just enough silliness for first graders to enjoy while sharpening their new reading skills.  Hoban has created an entertaining and snowy easy reader.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

Little, Jean.  EMMA'S MAGIC WINTER.  Illus by Jennifer Plecas.   I Can Read Series.
    New York: HarperCollins, 1998   64p  .0-06-025389-4; hb., $14.95;
    0-06-025390-8; lib.bdg., $14.89.   97-49667       K-Gr.3     ER

     There are seven chapters in this easy reader about how shy Emma makes friends with a new girl next door and her baby brother through magic boots and reading aloud.  Because the story takes place in winter, the girls play outside in the snow.  The winter setting is a natural part of the story.  By the time spring comes, Emma's self confidence has improved.  This easy reader moves emerging readers toward chapter books.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

Nagel, Karen Berman.  SNOW?  LET’S GO!  Illus by Carolyn Croll.  My First Hello
    Reader series, level 2.  New York:  Scholastic Cartwheel, 2000.  32p.
    0-439-09906-4; pb., $3.99.   99-30154     K-Gr. 2     ER

    The paperback format makes this easy reader accessible for home and classroom use.  Reading the few words per page, learners read about clothing necessary to wear out in the snow.  The humorous ending and rhyming text make the book fun to read.  The flash cards in the middle of the book can be removed for word recognition of winter clothing.  There are activities at the end of the book that include identifying rhyming words and items that are not winter clothing, finding pictures that do not belong in a winter scene, and placing items of clothing in the order they should be put on.  Answers appear on the last page.   Because of the potential for writing in the book and loosing the flash cards, this book is not recommended for library use unless encased in a plastic checkout bag.  Primary teachers will love this book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Ruelle, Karen Gray.  SNOW VALENTINES.  Holiday House Readers, Level. 2
    New York:  Holiday, 2000.  32p.    0-8234-1533-3; hb., $14.95    99-46315
    Gr. 1-2     ER       PAULIN’S PICKS

    It is difficult to write an easy reader that sustains the story while making it fascinating for emerging readers.  Ruelle does so admirably using sufficient repetition in four chapters about a cat named Harry and his sister, Emily.  The kittens get hugs from their mother and drawings from their father for special occasions and know this will be true for Valentine’s Day also.  The cat kids want to do something special for Valentine’s Day but after unfavorable feedback from their parents, they discard paper hearts, a dance, a song, a dessert, and finally settle on the newly fallen snow to help them express their love for their parents.  This is a humorous and tender story that is totally believable.    Although this title is a holiday and winter book, it can be read all year long because love and family don’t have boundaries dictated by the calendar.  Consider shelving it with the easy readers rather than with the holiday books, especially in snowy climates.  Even if your easy reader budget is limited, make sure that this is one of your selections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Rylant, Cynthia.  HENRY AND MUDGE AND THE SNOWMAN PLAN.
    Illus. by Sucie Stevenson.  Ready-to-Read Series, Level 2.  New York: Simon and
    Schuster, 1999. 40p. 0-689-81169-1; hb.,   $14.00.   98-108942     Gr. K-3    ER

    This is the 19th Henry and Mudge easy reader written by Rylant and illustrated by Stevenson using  her usual watercolors.  Three chapters are listed in the contents.   In the first chapter Henry learns about the snowman contest and asks his father to enter with him.  His father is green from painting a chair.  While Henry and his father build their snowman, Henry visits with his dog friends.  The last chapter shows a variety of entries:   snow people, cats, dogs, and aliens. The judges are mystified by Henry and his Dad's snowman until Henry tells them it is his dad painting a chair.  Winners are varied: Abraham Lincoln, a snow leopard and third place to the snowman with paint in his mustache.   They receive a ribbon for most original and a box of snowman cookies.  Snowman cookies would be a great treat after reading this book.  First and second grade teachers can have a box of snowman cookies in the reading corner for students to eat after reading the book to themselves.  This winning combination has produced another winner.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as s school library media specialist

 Stadler, John.  READY, SET, GO!  Illus. by the author.  I Can Read Series, Level 1.
    New York:  HarperCollins, 1996.  32p.    0-06-024947-1; lib.bdg., $15.89
    0-06-444238-1; pb. $3.75       95-26452       PreS-Gr. 2      ER

    Although the story is simple to read, this easy ready has a theme and plot.  Little Sasha, a dog, wants her cousin Oliver to play with her but he takes pride in building a bigger snowman and a bigger fort only to be outdone by his friend Juliet.  However, Sasha saves Juliet from disaster while they are skating and the bigger dogs decide to let her play with them.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

 Van Laan, Nancy.  MOOSE TAILS.  Illus by Amy Rusch.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin,
    1999.  unp.  0-395-90863-9; hb.,   $15.00.  97-41273   K-Gr.3      ER

    In the third story of this easy reader, "The Snow Creature," Beaver, Moose, Mouse, Rabbit, and Squirrel all add features important to them to make a snow creature like a long bushy tail or two long, thin ears.  Before showing students the final snow creature, have them draw what they think it might look like. All three stories in this easy reader are about the same woodland creatures.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist
 

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Snow Nonfiction Books

Allen, Jean.  BLIZZARDS.  Natural Disasters series.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone High-
    Interest, 2001.  48p.  0-7368-899-X; lib.bdg., $21.26   00-013195   Gr. 3-9    551.55

    Numerous full-page color photos add to the appeal of this title in a series that includes FOREST FIRES, FLOODS, and TSUNAMIS.  Some famous blizzards covered in the book are the Armistice Day blizzard in 1940, the Alberta Clipper of 1941, the Blizzard of 1888, the Storm of the Century in 1993, and the Blizzard of 1996.  Readers learn about what makes a blizzard, how to survive in one, how they are predicted, as well as information about wind chill, frostbite, and hypothermia.  A section called "Words to Know" includes seven items, the "To Learn More" bibliography includes five items including Murphy's BLIZZARD (Scholastic, 2000) which is an excellent companion book because they complement one another.  There are four "Useful Addresses," and five "Internet Sites."  The index, map, and wind chill chart are also helpful.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

Berger, Melvin and Gilda.  BRRR!  A BOOK ABOUT POLAR ANIMALS.
    Hello Reader,  Science, Level 3.  New York:  Scholastic Cartwheel, 2000.
    0-439-20165-9; pb., $3.99  00-020823   Gr. 1-2    591.7  or   ER

    A memo to families at the beginning of this books relates that this series helps readers "learn to read by remembering frequently used words like "the," "is," and "and;" by using phonics skills to decode new words, and by interpreting picture and text clues."  There are four or more suggestions for readers before, during, and after reading the book.   The animals in the photos are in bold print in the text to help readers identify them.  The book is totally illustrated with color photos that appear in appealing patterns on the pages.  There is enough information about the Arctic and Antarctic and the animals that live there to make this book useful to classes who are studying the poles.  Because the simple and informative sentences are not condescending, this book can be used for readers above the recommended grades and for beginning adult readers.   There is no question about the value of this book, especially in paperback format.  The only question librarians will ask is whether it should be shelved with easy readers or science books.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

Branley, Franklyn.  SNOW IS FALLING.  Illus by Holly Keller.
    Let-s Read-and Find-Out-About series.  New York:  HarperCollins, 1986, 2000.
    34p.   0-06-027990-7; hb., $15.95.   98-23106      K-Gr. 3   551.57

    Branley’s classic snow book has been updated with illustrations from front to back endpapers which are blue with white snowflakes.  The watercolors illustrate the straightforward text which contains simple sentences to explain what makes snowflakes; how snow helps plants, animals, and humans; and  the dangers of snow, including spring flooding.  Branley always involves readers in his books.  Branley asks readers to look at the six sides of each snowflake through a magnifying glass, to walk through snow and tell what type of snow it is, and to read two thermometers to see whether or not the thermometer buried in snow is warmer than one hanging in the air.   At the end of the book, two experiments, three snow web sites, and three books to read are provided.  Replace your old copy with this one or buy your first one for daycare centers, elementary school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Calabro, Marian.  THE PERILOUS JOURNEY OF THE DONNER PARTY.  New York:
    Clarion, 1999.  192p.   0-395-86610-3; hb., $20.00     98-29610   Gr. 4-10+    979.4

    A map tracing the journey from Springfield, IL to Sutter's Fort, CA is included at the beginning of the book to offer readers a pictorial view of  the shortcuts taken by the Donner Party as well the usual route.  Also helpful is the list of the 32 family members and employees who left Springfield in April, 1846.  A chronology and roster of the dead at the end of the book are useful.  A number of books for young readers, videos, and web sites as well as an extensive bibliography complete the book. The text reads like an adventure story;   it is one of the most celebrated and gruesome stories in American History.
     Most Americans have heard of the Donner Party but only know that they were a lost wagon train who had to eat each other to survive.  They are often thought of as a group.  Calabro brings the party alive as individuals and provides readers with interesting, little known details about the trip.  The group could have been called the Reed party because James Reed and the Donner Brothers were successful men who went into this venture together.  Readers learn a lot about the Reed family, especially 12-year-old Virginia the tomboy, her grandmother who dies early in the venture, her mother who travels in luxury in her Pioneer Palace Car, her father's fall from grace when he kills another party member and is banished from the train, her father's rescue mission, and their subsequent good fortune in California.  Because of George Donner's ad in the newspaper a number of single men came along as teamsters whose job was to walk beside the oxen all the way to California.    Mary Lincoln probably saw the party leave Springfield. The Breen family of Iowa were Irish immigrants who joined the part later.  Hastings wrote a  book which told travelers of the shortcut he had never taken.  Males over the age of 14 voted on wagon train matters like whether or not to take the "shortcut."  It was disappointing to learn that Jim Bridger lied to the party just to sell them supplies.  The men who killed the scouts were never brought to trial because killing Indians was not a crime.  The families kept their own supplies and prepared their own dwellings during the fateful winter.  A German who beat his wife, may have killed one of the women and eaten her.  There was a protocol to eating others, family members were spared from eating a relative.
    Statistics are interwoven and provide interesting information about the trip: there were  9 original wagons;  women had a higher survival rate then men;  of the 43 teenagers and children, almost two out of three survived but more than half of them lost both parents and were orphans when they reached California.  Only two families made it to California without loss of life.  In 1996, at the 150th anniversary of the start of the journey, 450 of the 2,500 descendants held a reunion.   Charts showing amounts of food per adult brought along and the number of overland emigrants going to Oregon and California between 1840 and 1850 add interest to the text.
    Especially interesting is the chapter about the survivors, told person by person.  A 12-year-old boy who was rescued died from overeating.  Virginia Reed died at age 87.   The information about each family is extensive and required much research. A number of letters and diary entries are provided so this book could be used to explain  primary sources.  Calabro discusses various memoirs written after the disaster and their probable validity.   Black and white photos, drawings, and maps of party members, sites, and monuments, are disbursed throughout the text at appropriate places and add interest to the saga.  This well-rounded chronicle will be useful to intermediate, middle and high school  history students learning about settling the American West but it will also be picked up because of its name recognition by readers of all ages.  Share this book with readers who were fascinated with the Titanic disaster.   Highly recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years experience as a school library/media specialist

Drake, Jane and Ann Love.  THE KIDS WINTER HANDBOOK.  Illus by Heather Collins.
    Tonawanda, NY:  Kids Can, 2001.  128p.  1-55337-033-3; hb., $18.951-55074-969-2;
    pb., $12.95 C2001-900531-8  Gr. K-4     790.1

    This book is "jammed-packed" with over a hundred interesting indoor and outdoor  projects about winter.  Some projects include weather recording and forecasting, star and animal track identification, kitting a scarf or making a fleece headband, tips for starting a campfire or a fire in a fireplace, snow games and art, bird feeding, making string or toothpick snowflakes, pinecone skier, indoor smores, hot chocolate and a gingerbread house.  The directions are clear and complete, the pencil sketches with green backgrounds add interest and information to the text and are helpful, and the projects are worthwhile.  This craft book also functions as a science book.  This book is recommended for school and public libraries everywhere but is essential in areas where snow is abundant.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

Finnegan, Mary Pat.  WINTER:  SIGNS OF THE SEASON AROUND NORTH AMERICA.
    Illus by Jeremy Schultz.  Minneapolis: Picture Window, 2003.  24p.  1-4048-0001-8; lib.bdg.
    PreS-Gr. 2     508.2

    Readers learn about winter in Alaska, Northwestern Canada, New England, the Midwest, the Appalachian Mountains, California, and Mexico.  At the end of the book there is a small picture to accompany the description of each of the areas that includes temperature and activities.  Besides the large print text, there is smaller text labeled FUN FACT.”  Some of the illustrations--the snow on the mountains and the orange trees--are a bit abstract for the age of the audience of a nonfiction picture book that is a teaching tool.  Another troublesome aspect is mixing countries, states, and sections of the country as if they are parallel.  Since there are only six different climate patterns, one of which includes a state and a section in another country, it would have been better to stick to the same geographical pattern.  The book ends with a project, glossary, index, list of five age appropriate books, and three web sites one of which lists sunrise/sunset times around the world which adds another dimension to a picture book intended for young children.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Gibbons, Gail.  POLAR BEARS.  Illus by author.  New York:  Holiday, 2001.
    32p.  0-8234-1593-7; hb., $16.95.  00-054075    Gr. K-4     599.786

    Besides learning about polar bears, readers learn about the Arctic and the animals that live there.  There is a map showing the Arctic and besides full-page drawings, there are close-ups; labels for parts of the bear, the bottom of the paw, and underfur.  Readers learn about the bear's amazing sense of smell, communication, keeping warm, size, food, dens, cubs, and dangers.  The last page shows some additional facts about polar bears. This life cycle book is great for emerging readers of all ages.  The illustrations are up to Gibbons' quality standards and can be enjoyed even without the text.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

Green, Jen.  POLAR REGIONS.  Saving Our World series.  London: Aladdin, 2001 and
    Brookfield, CT:  Copper Beech/Millbrook, 2001.  32p.  0-7613-2162-4; lib.bdg., $21.90
    Gr. 4-6     333.7

    The maps, photos, and drawings spread artistically throughout the pages of this science book add interest to the text.   Some topics covered are polar regions, animal life, damage to the area, including ozone holes, greenhouse effect, and global warming, and protecting life.  Added features are the review at the back of the book, environmental addresses and projects, a glossary, and index as well as questions and answers disbursed throughout the book.  This utilitarian nonfiction book about the poles will be a useful addition to general knowledge in public libraries and curriculum support in school libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

Love, Ann and Jane Drake.  THE KIDS BOOK OF THE FAR NORTH.  Illus by Jocelyne
    Bouchard.  Niagra Falls, NY: Kids Can, 2000.  1-55074056308; lib.bdg.,  $15.95.
    C99-933011     Gr. 3-8     909.09

    Maps, sky, prehistory, landscape (ice and permafrost), plants, animals, birds, and people are the substance of this book.   Ancient and modern peoples are:  Saami (Laplanders), Evenki, Nganasan, Paleo-Eskimos, Nenets, Inuit, and Inupiat.   Sidebars abound with the “Eco Watch” being the most frequent.  Printed on a pale blue background, the watch discusses information about ecological concerns.  Other sidebars are charts and tables.   Some sidebars are bounded with black line, one of which is a particularly gruesome version of  “Sedna, the Sea Spirit.”  If the polar regions are part of the curriculum, then this book is a good choice for school or public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience of as a school library media specialist

Lunge-Larsen, Lise.  THE RACE OF THE BIRKEBEINERS.  Illus by Mary Azarian.
    Boston:  Houghton Mifflin, 2001.  32p.  0-618-10313-9; hb., $16.00.  00-053977
    Gr. 2-7+     398.2            PAULIN'S PICKS

    According to the title page, this Norwegian legend is "Based on the account in "Hakon Hakonsson's Saga" penned in 1264 by Sturla Tordsson.  Beginning with the gold emblem embossed on the hard cover and repeated on the back of the paper jacket, the illustrations are worthy of Azarian, a Caldecott winner with SNOWFLAKE BENTLEY (HM, 1998).  Woodblocks are the perfect medium for the birch trees on the front cover and the borders that surround some of the illustrations within.  Even the bordered title page, showing an old Norse stave church, is a work of art.
    According to the "Author's Note" at the end of the book, Lunge-Larsen tells that she added feelings to the legend about Prince Hakon from the Saga.  A selected bibliography follows.  The blurb on the back book jacket flap tells about the Birkebeier race in Hayward, WI that the author has skied twice.  This cross-country ski race in Norway and Wisconsin, commemorates the centuries old event told in this book.
    The legend, written like a pose poem, is about fierce peasant warriors from Norway, the Birdkebeiners, so named because of the birch bark wrapped around their legs instead of armor.  On Christmas Eve in 1206, a priest came with a young woman and an infant who was Prince Hakon (HO-kun) who had been born three weeks after the death of the king.  The priest had hidden the baby and Inga of Varteig for over a year from the Baglers, rich nobles and false bishops who wanted to the peasant's money and wanted to rule the kingdom.  To outwit the Baglers, skiers from Lillehammer took Inga and the baby over the tallest and stormiest mountains in Norway. "Now if this were a fairy tale, the story would be over.  But this story is true, and what happened next is perhaps the most miraculous of all."  How Inga saved her son's heritage from the Baglers through carrying burning irons, follows this statement.  The book concludes with Hakon becoming one of the most powerful kings of Norway during the Middle Ages and Norway's Golden Years.
    This is a handsome book and a stirring story.   This picture book is highly recommended for libraries of all kinds, but it is essential where there is a large Scandinavian population and lots of snow.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

Martin, Jacqueline Brigs.  SNOWFLAKE BENTLEY.  Illus by Mary Azarian.  Boston:
    Houghton Mifflin, 1998.  unp.       0-395-86162-4; hb., $16.00    97-12458
    PreS-Gr 3+  551.57     or     92      or       E

     Every member of ALSC, the Association for Library Service to Children, can nominate  books for the Caldecott Medal.  This book was my nomination.  The woodcuts are an appropriate medium for a biography of a farmer who was born in 1865.   One cannot imagine the farm buildings and setting executed in another medium.   The snowflake woodcuts on the blue background provide a recurring pattern that unifies the book even though one would expect all of the snowflakes to be different.   Although Bentley was from Vermont, he was a rugged individualist who could have just as easily lived in Michigan's Upper Peninsula or any other snowy, rural region.  A photo of Bentley and his camera as well as pictures of three of his snowflakes, appear in the afterword along with a bibliography.  This information entices readers to look for the National Geographic magazine containing Bentley's photos.  Comparisons between Bently's photos and those of Marquette's George Shiras are inevitable because both were photographic pioneers who appreciated nature and both were published in National Geographic.  Every public and school library, regardless of where it is located,  needs a copy of this book.  Martin and Azarian have created a winner.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist
    *    Editor's note:  Winner of the 1999 Caldecott Medal.

Murphy, Jim.  BLIZZARD:  THE STORM THAT CHANGED AMERICA.
    Scholastic, 2000.  136p.  0-590-67309-2; hb., $18.95.    99-24894
    Gr. 4-10+   974.7     PAULIN’S PICKS

    Read this book with a cup of hot cocoa in front of a roaring fire.  Murphy has meticulously researched the “Blizzard of 1888."  Emphasis is on New York City although Murphy tracked the storm as it swept across the Midwest and traveled through New York and Pennsylvania.  Facts are seamlessly woven into the text.  One example is the origin of the word blizzard.  Murphy cites his sources including the 1,2000 letters written by members of the Society of Blizzard Men and Blizzard Ladies.  An index follows.
    The stories are fascinating: the miraculous survival of two boys in a snowbank, a rich man giving out free coal, and various tests of courage.   Some stories are gruesome.  A Western Union lineman was electrocuted while thousands watched, a farmer died within feet of his house, and  a girl was left behind in the snow after escaping a flaming train.
    There is much to learn about working conditions at the turn of the century.  Many of the workers went to their jobs because there was high unemployment and they were afraid of losing their jobs.  Some risked their lives to go to work only to find the building locked or that their bosses were not there to be impressed.  The newest immigrants were the Italians and many were grateful to be hired by the day to dig out the railroad cuts into the city.  One interesting account involves a young reporter who went out to sea to write about the men who piloted the ships into the busy harbor.  Without knowing about the coming storm, Marshall went aboard Pilot Boat No. 13 and got more excitement than he expected as ships and men were tossed about.
    Murphy concludes this fascinating book with changes caused by the storm.   Although New York City was considered a modern marvel, it had no way to deal lots of snow.  Snow removal up to that time was the job of each property owner but after the storm became the responsibility of the city.  Wires for phone and electricity were buried, plans for the underground transportation system were taken seriously, ordinances for storage of coal and garbage were instituted, and regulations for signs were imposed.  Changes in weather prediction occurred.  Weather, handled by the Signal Corps, was taken out of the army and put into the Dept. of Agriculture and its name was changed to the U.S. Weather Bureau which would be open round the clock instead of being closed for the Sabbath.
    In order to give an “oldtime” appearance to the photos and sketches and to make them uniform, they all have a sepia tone.  The text is the same color.  However, this reader, who has glaucoma, found this a hindrance to reading the text.  Others will find it adds to the charm and flavor of the book.  Murphy lives up to a reputation that was established with ACROSS AMERICA ON AN EMIGRANT TRAIN (Houghton Mifflin, 1993) and THE GREAT FIRE (Scholastic, 1995.)
     In snowy climates, teachers can read part of this book aloud to stimulate students before they are turned loose with video or digital cameras and tape recorders to record local snowy survival stories.  This is an exceptional nonfiction book that is as essential in areas where snow occurs as it is in places where inhabitants have never seen snow.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Murphy, Stuart J.  MISSING MITTENS, Level 1: ODD & EVEN NUMBERS. MathStart series.
    Illus by G. Brian Karas. New York:  HarperCollins, 2001. 33p.  0-06-028026-3; hb., $15.95
    0-06-028027-1; lib.bdg., $15.89   0-06-446733-3; pb., $4.95    99-41334   PreS-Gr. 3    513.2

    The humorous rhyming text provides a fun way to learn about odd and even numbers from 1-8.  Readers see Farmer Bill in his red underwear, then fully dressed--except that he can’t find his other mitten.  Illustrations share the concept that one mitten is “odd,” and two mittens are “even.”  The concept of “pairs” is mentioned in the rhyme.  Humor enters the book when Bill notices that the cow only had three mittens rather than four on her teats and a drawing reinforces the “odd” and “even” concept.  Other animals that wear mittens are three chickens who should have six mittens and two horses who should have eight.  The mitten thief is finally found; a goat eating the mittens.  This book can also be used to teach counting by twos, (1, 3, 5, 7) and (2, 4, 6, 8) as reinforced by a drawing showing all the “odd” mittens in the top and “even” mittens on the bottom.  Even though the farm is from the past as evidenced from the old wood stove, it can be used for farmyard animal recognition.  As usual with this series, there are directions  “For Adults and Kids” which include helping children with the concept, other activities, and other books about numbers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Ross, Kathy,  CRAFTS TO MAKE IN THE WINTER.  Illus. by Vicky Enright.  Brookfield,
    CT, Millbrook, 1999.  64p.    0-7613-0319-7. $16.95.    98-43573   Gr. 3+    745.5

     A wide range and diversity of activities will make this book a welcomed addition; the craft section and will be grabbed by anyone ages 8-12.  Brownie leaders, teachers or moms will devour the contents.  Ross presents instructions and drawings for twenty-nine craft projects with a winter or holiday theme including puppets, Christmas ornaments, magnets, masks, Valentines and much more.  The instructions are concise and easy to follow which will make it sought  after on a cold, blustery, stay-in-the-house wintry day.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
    24 years of experience as a teacher and librarian

Seuling, Barbara.  WINTER LULLABY.  Illus. by Greg Newbold.  San Diego:
    Browndeer/Harcourt, 1998.  unp.   0-15-201403-9; hb., $16.00.
    95-52259  K-Gr. 3     591.54   or     811     or     E

    This  rhyme questions where various wildlife go during the winter; the answer is on another double page spread, also illustrated with acrylics.  "When the breeze blows/the petals off the flowers,/where do the bees go?"/ "Inside their hives/till spring arrives."  There are questions and answers for snakes, mice, bats, ducks, fish, and people.  The last pages show a father reading to two children "Out of the storm,/where it is warm."    The story is suitable for antiphonal choral reading.  The teacher can ask the questions and the class can answer in unison,  six students can respond to the teacher, or six pairs of students can ask questions of each other.  Choral reading can liven up study about the changing of the seasons.   This is an informative and attractive book that should be available in school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist
 
Stille, Darlene R.  WINTER.  Simply Science series.  Illus with photos.  Minneapolis:  Compass
    Point, 2001.  32p. 00-011006    07565-0096-6; lib.bdg., $14.95    Gr. K-3      508.2

    Large print and colorful photos help readers understand snowflakes, freezing and melting, ice, causes of winter, how animals cope, places where there is always winter, and how winter ends.  Besides the index, there is a glossary, list of interesting things to know, a bibliography of books, websites, and addresses for an almanac and a national park.  Although written for primary readers, adult ESL readers will also find this book interesting.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Yolen, Jane.  SNOW, SNOW: WINTER POEMS FOR CHILDREN.
    Photos by Jason Stemple.  Honesdale, PA: Wordsong/Boyds Mills, 1998.
    32p.   1-56397-721-4;  lib.bdg., $16.95  97-76914   Gr. 3-5     811.54

    Beautiful color photos inspired Yolen to write these poems.  All 13 of the poems have something to do with snow: “Snowmobile,” “Skier,” “Snow on the Trees,” and “Mountain Snowstorm.”  The poems and photos are artistically arranged to make a picture book for all climates, especially those with lots of winter.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Yolen, Jane, ed.  ONCE UPON ICE AND OTHER FROZEN POEMS.
    Photos by Jason Stemple.  Honesdale, PA: Wordsong/Boyds Mills, 1997.
    32p. 1-56397-408-8;  lib.bdg., $17.95  97-76914   Gr. 3-5     811.008

    According to the introduction, Yolen asked 17 other poets to look at Stemple’s “photos of ice formations and write whatever the photos inspired.”   The 22 poems are accompanied by the photos in pleasing arrangements to make an attractive picture book.  Some of the more well-known poets are: X. J. Kenedy, Mary Ann Hoberman, J. Patrick Lewis, Ann Turner, Lee Bennett Hopkins, and Nancy Willard.   Introduce these poems when studying seasons.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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