Dewey Guide: 500s

Subjects Listed in This Directory

 

500 GENERAL SCIENCE

Bailey, Martha.  AMERICAN WOMEN IN SCIENCE, 1950 TO THE PRESENT: A BIOGRAPHICAL 
        DICTIONARY.
Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 1998.  455p.  0-87436-921       Gr. 9+      509.2

        Vol. 2 of AMERICAN WOMEN IN SCIENCE includes women who were:  born 1920 or after;  started work after 1950; are a member of the National Academy of Sciences or National Academy of Engineering; recipient of a an award; worked primary in the U.S.; and made a significant contribution as a scientist.  The author, a life sciences librarian at Purdue University, used standard biographical sources to select the women.   It is helpful to have an alphabetical list of the over 300 women at the beginning of the book.  Another list is arranged by 78 specific areas of science but the main entry is in alphabetical order.  Some of the areas are:  computers; space program; astronomy and astrophysics; environment and ecology; medicine; economics; engineering; mathematics; physiology; psychiatry; psychology; social and behavioral sciences.   Individual entries include: year of birth and death, field, education, professional experience, marital status, children, and a one or two page article.  Volume 2  is a companion to Bailey's first volume:   AMERICAN WOMEN IN SCIENCE,  COLONIAL TIMES TO 1950: A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY (ABC-CLIO, 1994; $60).  When classes  write reports about scientists, it is difficult to find enough information about women.  Both of Bailey's books will also serve in schools where students investigate people in the news.  Although written for adults, middle and high school students would find information easy enough to comprehend.  Recommended for all public and university library reference collections and middle and high school collections where needed.
        Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Ehrlich, Robert. WHAT IF?  MIND-BOGGLING SCIENCE QUESTIONS FOR KIDS. Illus.by Ed Morrow.  
    New York: Wiley, 1998.  163 p.   0-471-17608-7; pb. $12.95      Gr. 5-9   500  or  507.8

    Ehrlich takes the abstract concepts of earth and space science and makes them concrete and fun.  He also includes topics of high interest such as the human body, inventions, and time.  This well organized book challenges the readers to ask, "What if?" questions about the world around them by beginning with the story of Albert Einstein.  Ehrlich probes, then answers, questions that children and adults have about the world and space.  In his answers, the author relates the abstract concepts and measurements to concrete, real-life examples.  Along with the easy experiments suggested, the humorous, but accurate cartoons add to the fun.  This book is a wonderful book for children to read.  Classroom teachers will find it useful to help with the abstract concepts and as a great starter for their lessons.
    Paula Diedrich; teacher, Graveraet Middle School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

McKeever, Susan, ed.  THE DK SCIENCE ENCYCLOPEDIA.   New York:  DK, 1998.
     2nd Am. Ed,  448 p  0-7894-2190-9, hb. $39.95.   97-20881.   Gr. 4+    503

     This encyclopedia is another of Dorling Kindersly's excellent and complete science books.  If you are familiar with this publisher, you know that each page is packed with information, excellent pictures, accurate illustrations, and guides to other parts of the book.  An example is a two page spread on Atomic Structure which includes basic information, illustrations of the basic subatomic particles down to quarks and gluons.  It also illustrates electrons in shells, relative size of atoms, a black and white photograph of a particle accelerator, two thumbnail biographies (John Dalton and Ernest Rutherford), a time line relating to subatomic particles and a handy box in the lower right hand corner that references radioactivity, bonding, elements, cargon, nuclear energy, light and the Fact Finder in this encyclopedia. In addition to twelve thematic sections science and technology, there are time charts on matter, energy, earth and space, and living things; several pages on "How Scientists Work" and safety, a complete section on fact finding, and easy to use index and glossary.  This is easy to read and find information.  It is helpful to use their own "How to use this book" at the beginning.  Even though it is well indexed and cross referenced, it is easy to just keep reading and looking through this beautiful encyclopedia.  This is a must for every library and classroom, and strongly suggested for home use.
     Rita Hrecz, PhD.,  Northern Michigan University Dept. of Education 

Meinking, Mary. WHO COUNTS PENGUINS? WORKING IN ANTARCTICA.
      Series: Wild Work, 8 Volumes. Ill. Photography. Chicago, Il: Raintree, 2011, 32p.
      ISBN 978-1-4109-3864-0, LibBdg. $29.00.    Gr. 1-3     NF 508.98.

      With ice 3 miles deep in some places, Antarctica, a frozen land, is the coldest place on earth. These facts from this latest addition to the Wild Work series, is a view into the lives of the scientists from many nations who study the land and wildlife of Antarctica. While not substantial enough for reports, it will interest and perhaps inspire science-minded children.
    
 Barb Ward, Retired Children’s Librarian, Dickinson County Library, Iron Mountain, MI

Schaefer, Lola M.  WHAT’S UP, WHAT’S DOWN?  New York:  Greenwillow/Harper, 2002.  32p.   
    0-06-029757-3 hb., $15.99   0-06-029758-1 lib.bdg. $17.89    2001-023895    Gr.  2-4     500

    This book needs to be turned sideways to read it and directions are part of the text: “Follow the arrows/and let your eyes travel up,/reading from the/BOTTOM of the page/to the TOP.”  “Then, halfway through,/turn the book around and/let your eyes travel down,/reading from TOP/to BOTTOM.”  The illustrations, executed with pastels, help interpret the text and intermingle with roots, grass, wildflowers, butterflies, trees, sky, and the moon.  Then up turns to down through clouds, the ocean, whales, seaweed, and down to the bottom of the world.  This is a more sophisticated book than the usual book of opposites but worth the effort for older readers.  Besides directions, readers learn creatures from the soil up to the sky and down to the depths of the sea and the creatures therein.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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508 NATURAL HISTORY

Levinson, Nancy Smiler.  NORTH POLE SOUTH POLE.  Illus.by Diane Dawson Hearn. New York: 
    Holiday House, 2002.  40p.    0-8234-1737-9; hb., $14.95     Gr. 1-2      ER    or     508.31

    A globe and then maps of the top and bottom of the earth show the North and South Poles.  Within the text readers learn about the axis, role of the sun, animals, people, and visits by scientists and explorers.  This is a suitable nonfiction easy reader that will be useful in studies about the Poles, winter, animal habitats, and continents.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Morrison, Gordon.  A DROP OF WATER.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2006
       32p.  ISBN: 978-0-618-58557-1 hb. $16.00.    Gr. K-4    j508

       This is the story of a water drop and the water cycle that it goes through, but not a scientific account.  It is a story of where the drop travels, what is around it, and how it makes it back to the place it began.  The illustrations tell the story as much as the words do.  Every set of pictures show where the drop was, where it is, and where it will go next.  They are rich with detail and will enhance the reader’s knowledge of the water cycle.
       The story starts with a drop of water falling from a child’s finger near a meadow brook, evaporating up into the clouds and returning again as rain in a mountain stream. The water continues down a waterfall into a small pool, through the forest and into a bog, which is part of a beaver pond.  Next the drop passes the beaver dam downstream into a lowland swamp, which spreads into a meadow marsh.  The marsh is connected to a farm pond that leads to the same meadow brook where the child is playing in the water.  Each page also talks about the wildlife and plant life that lives in, near areas of water.  The last two pages give detailed information regarding the life being described on each page.  This is great for curious kids who like to get all the information they can.
       Melissa Coyne, Substitute Teacher/Patron, Tahquamenon Area School and Public Library

Patent, Dorothy Hinshaw.  CHARLES DARWIN: THE LIFE OF A REVOLUTIONARY THINKER.  
    New York:  Holiday, 2001.  142 p.  0-8234 -1494-9; hb., $22.95    Gr. 6-12     576.8   

    Patent opens a door on 19th century England with her very personal style of writing.  We learn much about the family and friends of Charles Darwin through excerpts from his writings as well as the writings of friends, family members and other writers of the day.  Short biographies of friends and colleagues are included and help to place Darwin in historical and cultural context.  Darwin was a mediocre student who was little interested in general education but who had a passion for natural science.  Against his family's wishes, as a young man he set forth on a voyage aboard the "Beagle" which eventually led to the development of his theory of evolution and resulted in the publication of THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES.   Patent's narrative brings both the physical and intellectual journeys to life for the reader.  Darwin is presented as a complex and revolutionary figure who dared to question the established doctrine of his day.  He changed our view of the natural world and unleashed one of the great debates of science that still rages more than 150 years later.  As Patent states in the last chapter, "He helped teach biologists to ask, 'Why is that so?’  This is perhaps his greatest legacy."  Added elements include a chronology, glossary, bibliography, Internet references, and an index.  The illustrations are drawings and black and white photos.
    Carolyn Anderson; Retired teacher, L’Anse, Michigan, Member, L’Anse Public Library Advisory Board

Richards, Jon. UNITS AND MEASUREMENTS.  Illus. by Ian Thompson. Brookfield, CT:
    Copper Beech Books, 2000.  32p.   0-7613-1159-0 hb. $21.90.   Gr. 1-4   507.8

    Everything we do, everything we see, and everywhere we go can be measured in one kind of unit or another.  Included in this title are a dozen science experiments dealing with measurement of angles, density of different liquids, time, gravity, speed and volume. Wonderful photographic illustrations set on a page bordered with wheels and gears makes learning how to undertake these experiments most attractive.  The directions are clear and concise and the fact that many of the photos are of actual children demonstrating the steps described, makes it even more appealing; so much so that the reader might just decide to try an experiment or two just for the fun of it.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Schlepp, Tammy J.  SEASONS.  My World series; Level 3.  Brookfield, CT:  Copper Beech, 2000. 32p.
    0-7613-1224-2 lib.bdg., $17.90   0-7613-2332-5 pb., $3.99  00-055575    Gr. 1-3     ER   or   508.2

    Each of the four seasons is shown in clear and informative photos and drawings.  Questions are asked of readers within the main text to keep them involved.  “How can you tell when it’s spring?  The answers follow.  At the end there are two double page spreads in which readers review what they have learned.  Readers are asked to tell what season it is by looking at pictures of plants and animals.  The second double page spread has readers identify the season based on pictures of trees.  Answers to the questions appear on the index page.
    This easy reader provides readers with practice in reading as well as imparts interesting science information.  Just when adult readers are wondering why Schlepp is leaving the impression that the whole world has four seasons, she provides a double page spread that shows the rain forest, the South Pole, and Desert so readers will know that there are other patterns.  However, those who live in these other areas might not like having their area labeled as having “strange seasons.”   Purchase for independent readers, especially where enhancement of the science curriculum is important.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Stille, Darlene R.  WINTER.  Simply Science series.  Illus with photos.  Minneapolis:  Compass
    Point, 2001.  32p.  00-011006   07565-0096-6; lib.bdg., $14.95   Gr. K-3    508.2

    Large print and colorful photos help readers understand snowflakes, freezing and melting, ice, causes of winter, how animals cope, places where there is always winter, and how winter ends.  Besides the index, there is a glossary, list of interesting things to know, a bibliography of books, websites, and addresses for an almanac and a national park.  Although written for primary readers, adult ESL readers will also find this book interesting.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

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510 MATHEMATICS

Adler, David A.  HOW TALL, HOW SHORT, HOW FARAWAY.  Illus by Nancy Tobin.
     New York: Holiday, 1999.  unp.  0-8234-1375-6 hb. $ 15.95.   98-18802.   Gr. 2+   530.8

     Adler has created a model nonfiction picture book when he answers the three questions in the title with fascinating information from history.  Readers learn that ancient Egyptians measured a cubit as the distance from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger; Romans measured a mile as a thousand paces; the customary system used in the U. S. measured an inch as the width of a thumb; and the metric system used by the rest of the world measures a meter as one ten-millionth of the distance from the North Pole to the equator.  Readers are engaged by  Adler's suggestions to readers to measure using ancient and modern measuring systems and Tobin's informative but humorous illustrations.  This interesting way to compare the customary and metric systems is a winner.  Schools need this book for curriculum support and public libraries should have it for children as well as adults who are beginning readers.
     Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Adler, David.  YOU CAN, TOUCAN, MATH.  Illus. by Edward Miller.  New York: 
           
Holiday House, 2006.  ISBN 0-823419193 hb. $16.95   Gr. 1-3   j511.33           

            Word problems in the form of riddles are made simple with birds as the focus of this problem-solving fun.  “Robins resting the first day of fall.  Six here.  Seven there.  How many in all?”  The artwork shows six robins in one birdhouse and seven robins nesting next door.  Calculate in your head or count them one by one to come up with the answer, which is written sideways on the page.  Edward Miller, the illustrator, visually represents the numbers in way that enables young mathematicians to grasp the concept of word problems.  This book is recommended for elementary school and public libraries.
           
Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Clements, Andrew.  A MILLION DOTS.  Illus. by Mike Reed.  Simon & Schuster Publishing, 2006.  
            48p.  ISBN 1-00689858248 hb. $16.95   Gr. 3-6   j513.211       

            Math lovers will be intrigued as the author starts with a single dot on the first page and continues until one million dots have been used throughout the book.  Illustrator, Mike Reed, covers each digital illustration with a grid of dots, like pixels on a computer screen – very clever.  He adds a tab of bright color on each page to encase bits of math trivia, such as the number of hairs on an average human head A MILLION DOTS covers a lot of mathematical trivia and that you wouldn’t have known before reading this book.            
           
Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Daniels, Teri.  MATH MAN.  Illus. by Timothy Bush.  London, England:  Orchard Books, 2001.  
    32p.   0-439293081  lib. bdg.; $16.95   Gr. 3-6     E

    Here’s an entertaining story that tells about the importance of math in everyday life.  Mrs. Gourd takes her classroom students on a field trip to the produce department of a grocery store where they meet Garth, the produce stocker.  Garth’s superb math skills, especially in the areas of addition and multiplication, impress even the most uncooperative students. The engaging illustrations are composed of cartoon caricatures with vivid facial expressions.  The illustrator also incorporates a checkered border into every page that carries the supermarket theme throughout the book.  Teachers could easily use this book to integrate language arts and mathematics.  It would be a welcome addition to any library that serves elementary students.
    Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter white Public Library, Marquette, MI

Evans, Lezlie.  CAN YOU COUNT TEN TOES?  COUNT TO 10 IN 10 DIFFERENT LANGUAGES.   
    Illus by Denis Roche.  Boston: Houghton, 1999.  0-395-90499-4, hb.  $15.00.   97-48915.  Gr. 3+   513.2

     A cat and child count toes, fish, coins and other items in Japanese, Russian, Korean, Zulu, French, Hindi, Tagalog, Hebrew, Spanish, Chinese.  The gouache illustrations brighten the book.  The arabic numeral, character, word in that language, and phonetic pronunciation are given for each language.  A map, showing the areas of the world where the language is spoken, is important.  One wonders why English was not included.  Foreign language and ESL teachers will love this book.  Evans' book is an essential purchase wherever other languages are studied or spoken and an important purchase because it is  a nonfiction book that appeals to the curious of  all ages.
     Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Harris, Trudy.  100 DAYS OF SCHOOL.  Illus. by Beth Griffis  Johnson.  Brookfield, CT:
    Millbrook, 1999.  32p.   0-7868-0507-2; hb., $15.99    0-7868-2443-3; lib.bdg.,
    $21.90   98-18952    Gr. K-2      513.2   or     E

    Because of the clever rhyme,  this book can be used as antiphonal choral reading.  The leader reads the longer part and when the page is turned, the audience can give the response which is short enough to be placed on cue cards or a  transparency.  The book begins "If you go to school for 95 days, and then go 5 more days, what do you get?  Smarter and Smarter.  And..."  The response, on the verso of that page, is "(how cool)/100 Days of School!"   No hand signals need to be given to elicit the response because the word "and" followed by a pause appears at the end of each leader's section.  Each of the eleven sections begins with "if" and ends with "and."  No matter what the combination of numbers on each page, the total comes to 100.  This book is great for reinforcing numbers or for classes who celebrate the hundredth day.  Use in conjunction with EMILY'S FIRST 100 DAYS OF SCHOOL by Wells (Hyperion, 2000).
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Hoban, Tana.  LET'S COUNT.  New York: Greenwillow, 1999.  40p.  0-688-16008-5; 
    hb., $16.00.  0-688-16009-3; lib.bdg., $15.93   98-44739   PreS-Gr.2    513.2  or   E

    Each double page spread follows the same format.  A large yellow numeral on the bright turquoise background, the word with it's proper number of items, and dots to represent the number appear in white.  The page opposite has a photograph of one item.  There is no theme to the subject in the photos.  One is a chicken, two ice cream cones, three holes in something metal.  The numbers go past twelve rolls of toilet paper through 20 manikin heads then progress by tens to a hundred spools of thread.  The items are as varied as luggage carts, crushed pop cans, and candy apples.  The only common element is their clarity and color.  There is no list of the items at the end of the book so readers may never know what type of object has the three holes in it.  Young children will need an adult to read with them to identify the objects   This is not Hoban's best but it is still better than most.  Purchase if you need another realistic counting book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Johnson, Tami.  NEAR AND FAR.  Photos by Scott  Thoms.  Mankato, MN: Capstone Press,
            2007.  32p.  ISBN: 978-0-7368-6736-8 hb. $17.95     Gr. PreS-2    j510.

            NEAR AND FAR is a good introduction to the basic concepts of near and far.  It has very nice photo illustrations with text appropriate for read-aloud or the early reader.  In addition to the usual text there is a glossary, Read More section and internet reference sites. 
            Bettina Graber, Munising School Public Library, Munising, MI

Koomen, Michelle.  FRACTIONS:  MAKING FAIR SHARES.  Mankato, MN:
    Capstone, 2001. 24p.  0-7368-0817-5 lib.bdg. $17.26      Gr. 1-4     513.2

    This no nonsense title about fractions effectively uses clear, crisp, and colorful photo and diagrams to explain the concepts.  The only confusing part is the picture that shows two pieces of a chocolate bar, each of which contains six sections in each piece.  This extra sectioning of the pieces causes unnecessary questions not addressed by the text.  The pizza is a small personal one and the text says “One whole pizza is too much for one kid to eat.”  However, I am not sure that a quarter of the pizza shown would satisfy the four kids in the picture.  It does solve the problem of taking a small or medium pizza and cutting it into quarters that would be too big for the kids in the picture.  Since the phrase “fair share” is used in every example, this book could also reinforce the concept of fairness.  At the end of the book there are directions for cutting paper into fractions of l/2, 1/3, and 2/3.  The list of five “Words to know” includes phonetic spellings.  There is a list of four fiction and nonfiction fraction books, three Internet sites, and an index on the last page.  This book can be used independently or after a teacher has divided an orange, candy bar, pizza, rope licorice, and a pecan pie.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Lyon, George Ella.  COUNTING ON THE WOODS.  Photos by Ann W. Olson.  New York:  DK INK, 1998. 
    0-7894-2480-0, hb., $15.95.  97-34117   PreS-Gr. 3+     513.2     PAULIN'S PICKS citation.

     Lyon's book gives extra value for the money; three different concepts in one picture book:
poetry, counting, and nature study.  The poem is in large print while the captions for the photos appears in lighter, smaller, italic print.  Each photo caption explains all or part of a rhyming couplet; "Eight flowers fed on dirt and showers."  The captions identify crested dwarf  iris, star chickweed, trillium, and lady slippers.  Five nests are also identified.  The pages for  "Ten trees whose innumerable leaves clean the air for everything that breathes." can prompt a discussion of photosynthesis or air pollution. Upper Peninsula  teachers will want a copy for their own rooms and other teachers will want copies available to use with biome studies. This is a picture book for all age groups and is a necessary addition to school, public, and home collections.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Shaskan, Trishna Speed.  IF YOU WERE A FRACTION.  Illus. by Francesca Carabelli.
          Mankato, MN: Picture Window Books, 2009. 24p. 978-1-4048-4790-3    Gr. 2-4   j513.2

          If you were a fraction...the possibilites are endless. You could be part of a pie, a pizza, a candy bar, or a cookie.  Colorful illustrations demonstrate what happens when something is divided into equal parts. A glossary, websites and further reading recommendations are included in this very user-friendly introduction to fractions.
          Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Murphy, Stuart J.  BIGGER, BETTER, BEST.  Illus by Marsha Winborn.  MathStart series,
    Level 2.   New York: HarperCollins, 2002.  33p.  0-06-028918-X; hb., $15.99
    0-06-028919-8; lib.bdg., $17.89   0-06-446247-1; pb., $4.99    Gr. 1-3    516

    This is a story that children and adults can both relate to.  We've all been around people who are constantly competing to see who's the best.  Through the competition of quibbling siblings, the author nicely works in the concept of measuring area using non-standard units in a variety of applications.  The whimsical illustrations add interest to the book and make the characters dance across the pages.  Teachers can use this book as lesson in itself or to introduce a unit on measurement.  Students may want to re-read it for story content or to work out the measurement problems. Every classroom library for primary students will want a copy of this book.
    Lynette Suckow, Northern Michigan University Graduate Student

Murphy, Stuart J. CAPTAIN INVINCIBLE AND THE SPACE SHAPES: LEVEL 2—
    THREE DIMENSIONAL SHAPES.  Illus. by Remy Simard.  MathStart series.
    New York: HarperCollins, 2001. 40p.   0-06-028022-0; hb., $15.95
    0-06-028023-9; lib.bdg., $15.89    00-039609     K-Gr. 2     516  or   E

    The MathStart series scores again!  An excellent way to introduce a unit on three-dimensional shapes is this story about Captain Invincible and his intrepid space-dog, whose name just happens to be Comet.  Done is colorful cartoon fashion, the illustrations draw the readers right into the adventure using the Space Shaper panel, with its three-dimensional buttons that include a cube, a cone and a pyramid.  The captain and his pup wage a war against a meteor shower, a flying saucer, poison gas, and a galactic beast. The book concludes with reinforcing activities and strategies that parents and teachers will appreciate.  So count down earthlings...get ready for take-off into a fun and educational reading experience!
    Patricia J. Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
    25 years of experience working with children in school and public libraries

Murphy, Stuart J.  MISSING MITTENS, Level 1: ODD & EVEN NUMBERS .
    MathStart series.  Illus by G. Brian Karas.  New York: HarperCollins, 2001. 33p.
    0-06-028026-3; hb., $15.95   0-06-028027-1; lib.bdg., $15.89   0-06-446733-3; pb.,
    $4.95    99-41334      PreS-Gr. 3       513.2

    The humorous rhyming text provides a fun way to learn about odd and even numbers from 1-8.  Readers see Farmer Bill in his red underwear, then fully dressed--except that he can’t find his other mitten.  Illustrations share the concept that one mitten is “odd,” and two mittens are “even.”  The concept of “pairs” is mentioned in the rhyme.  Humor enters the book when Bill notices that the cow only had three mittens rather than four on her teats and a drawing reinforces the “odd” and “even” concept.  Other animals that wear mittens are three chickens who should have six mittens and two horses who should have eight.  The mitten thief is finally found; a goat eating the mittens.  This book can also be used to teach counting by twos, (1, 3, 5, 7) and (2, 4, 6, 8) as reinforced by a drawing showing all the “odd” mittens in the top and “even” mittens on the bottom.  Even though the farm is from the past as evidenced from the old wood stove, it can be used for farmyard animal recognition.  As usual with this series, there are directions  “For Adults and Kids” which include helping children with the concept, other activities, and other books about numbers.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Murphy, Stuart J.  ONE…TWO…THREE.  SASSAFRAS!  Illus by John Wallace.
    MathStart Series Level  1.  HarperCollins, 2002. 40p.  0-06-028916-3; hb., $15.99
    0-06-028917-1; lib.bdg., $17.89  0-06-446246-3; pb., $4.99    Gr.1-2    515.24

     This simple story is an entry level addition to the MathStart series.  Uncle Howie wants to take a picture of his nieces and nephews from youngest to oldest, but something always interrupts the process and ruins his picture.  The illustrations are stiff, but colorful.  Teachers may want to include this book in their classroom libraries as a part of the MathStart collection.
    Lynette Suckow, Northern Michigan University Graduate Student

Murphy, Stuart J. SEAWEED SOUP; LEVEL 1.   Illus. by Frank Remkiewica.
    MathStart series.  New York: HarperCollins, 2001. 40p.  0-06-028032-8; hb., $15.95
    0-06-028033-6; lib.bdg., $15.89   99-087634    PreS-K     511.3   or    E

    It's never too soon to begin with math concepts.  At least that is the point that Murphy is trying to get across with this level 1 MathStart book.  The concept is matching sets or one-to-one correspondence.  Appealing to the very young reader, turtle concocts some green and slimy soup that SMELLS!   It is seaweed soup and it is Turtle's favorite lunch.  He decides to share it with his friends, Crab, Sandpiper, and Seagull.  One by one his friends come to the table that requires Turtle to find additional place settings, creating a dilemma for him.  The whimsical illustrations encourage the reader to match sets and count the items in each set.  Of help to the adult sharing the books with a child is concluding ideas for extending what has been covered as well as offering appealing ideas that strengthen the concept.  A truly delicious find!
    Patricia J. Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Murphy, Stuart J.  SHARK SWIMATHON.  Illus by Lynne Cravath.  MathStart series.
    New York: HarperCollins, 2001. 40p.  0-06-028030-1; hb., $15.95   0-06-028031-X;
    lib.bdg., $15.89  0-06-446735-X; pb., $4.95    99-30312    Gr. 2-4        513.12

    This is an easy and fun-filled way to learn how to subtract two-digit numbers.  The Ocean City shark swim team needs money to attend the state swim camp.  The coach learns that the Ocean City Bank will send any team to camp if they swim a total of 75 laps by the end of the week.  The sharks make a chart with their goal of 75 laps.  They mark down names of sharks and the number of laps they swim, add them up, and subtract that from 75.  Drama enters the story when one of the stars cannot swim because he fell off his bike and hurt himself.  The goal for each member has to be adjusted and they may not make 75 laps.  This book also slips in two other concepts, several days of the week and projection based on information.  This is one of the best books in this series.  Teachers can use it as a model for writing a class book based on a similar project or individual students can write their own book using this book as a pattern.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Murphy, Stuart J.  SLUGGERS’ CAR WASH.  Illus by Barney Saltzberg.  MathStart series,
    Level 3. New York:  HarperCollins, 2002. 32p. 0-06-028920-1; hb., $15.99 
    0-06-028921-X; lib.bdg., $17.89   0-06-446248-X; pb., $4.99     Gr. 2-4    513.12

    Another book from the MathStart series, this one is at Level 3 for children ages 7 and up.  The idea of raising money for team uniforms by hosting a car wash uses real-life applications of math skills.  However, the story line runs thin in the second half of the book, as the text is dominated by money terms for collecting fees, making change, and subtracting the cost of supplies.  The illustrations save the book with vivid colors and attention to detail.  This book is suitable for a classroom library, for kicking off a math lesson, or for independent study by a single student.
     Lynette Marten, Northern Michigan University Graduate Student

 Pomeroy, Diana.  ONE POTATO: A COUNTING BOOK OF POTATO PRINTS.
    Illus.  by author.  San Diego:  Harcourt, 1996.  0-15-200300-2; hb., $15.00
    0-15-202330-5; pb., $6.00      95-10986   PreS-Gr.3       513.2   or    E

     The illustrations, potato prints using acrylic paint, can be used to inspire students to potato prints of their own.  Fruits and vegetables from 1-10 accompany the numeral , the numeral spelled out, and the name of the fruit or vegetable.  After 10, Pomeroy continues by tens from 20 radishes to 100 sunflower seeds.  Two pages at the end of the book are devoted to creating potato prints.  Except for the radishes looking like small turnips, the illustrations are realistic.  This is a very appealing counting book and teachers, especially art teachers, will be pleased that it is now available as a Voyager paperback.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Rau, Dana Meachen.  A STAR IN MY ORANGE:  LOOKING FOR NATURE'S SHAPES.  
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002. 32p.  0-7613-1414-3 lib.bdg. $22.90     K-Gr. 3    j516

    Beginning with a large photo of a star within an orange, there are also photos of a starfish, snowflake, and daisy to show other stars in nature.  Antlers and a child's arms look like branches on a tree.  There are also three polygons (not identified by name) and three spirals.  A double-page spread at the end shows nine smaller labeled photos of patterns in nature.  There is no index to this shape book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Schmandt-Besserat, Denise.  THE HISTORY OF COUNTING. Illus. by Michael Hays.
    New York:  Morrow, 1999.   0-688-13118-8; hb., $17.00    0-688-14119-6; lib.bdg.,
    $15. 96-35316    Gr.4-8+     513.5   Paulin's Picks Citation.

    Acrylics on linen effectively help to  bring a potentially dry subject to life.  Facts about various counting systems are fascinating, even concrete and abstract numbers.  Most primitive counting systems were suitable because the societies had no need of large numbers.  Notches, body counting, different shaped tokens for different items, wedges and circles, The Sumerian's base 6, the Phoenicians' base 10, and the Roman improvement on the Greek system.  Abstract counting developed over a long period of time and only became important as trade and cities developed.  The invention of Arabic numerals made limitless counting possible because of the zero but it took centuries to change from the Roman to the Arabic system.   A Roman counting board that looks like an abacus is shown but no mention of Chinese counting is included.   The author makes it easy to understand the difficult concepts by providing details like mentioning that a trillion is one followed by 12 zeros. The glossary explains terms such as  the googol and  googolplex which are mentioned in the text.   An index makes the book more effective.  There aren't many books on this topic and this one is an outstanding addition for school and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Schwartz, David M.  IF YOU HOPPED LIKE A FROG.  Illus. by James Warhola.
    New York: Scholastic, 1999.  32p.  0–590-09857-8; hb. $15.95.   Gr. 1-4    513.2

    Math was never so much fun.  Schwartz helps readers to learn about ratios by comparing humans and animals– hopping like a frog to a human jumping “from home plate to first base in one mighty leap!” or “If you scurried like a SPIDER...you could charge down an entire football field in just two seconds!”  At the end of the book there are numbers for each of the dozen examples and an explanation of the math needed to come up with the answer given in the first part of the book.   Even the ending bear hug is fun.  Kids can read it for fun, with or without a grownup, and math teachers at all levels will use when teaching ratios.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Swinburne, Stephen R.  WHAT'S A PAIR?  WHAT'S A DOZEN? Illus. with photos. Honesdale, PA:  
    Boyds Mills, 2000.  32p.  1-56397-827-X; hb., $15.95    99-63097    PreS-Gr.3       j510

     The following concepts introduced in this book are:  single, first, uni, pair, couple, second, double, bi, tri, triple, third, several, few, many,, half a dozen, a dozen, baker's dozen, and odd and even numbers.   Readers are asked to find a pair, identify a unicycle, find the person first in line, and three other questions.  The photos provide the necessary reinforcement for the text so that readers understand the concepts and they are very good but not excellent in quality.  This book should be purchased by  preschools,  elementary schools, public libraries,  and for English as a Second Language programs for children and adults.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Tang, Greg.  THE GRAPES OF MATH: MIND-STRETCHING MATH RIDDLES. Illus by Harry Briggs.  
    New York: Scholastic, 2001.  40p. 0-439-21033-x; hb., $16.95   00-30062   Gr. 3-8    793.7

    Instructions are provided to readers in a rhyming riddle form that is more instruction than it is riddle.  Readers are asked to look at pictures of objects and then count them.  At the end of the book the same illustrations in smaller format show ways of creating patterns to add, subtract, and multiply in other patterns, making it easier and faster to do the counting.  This is an excellent choice for school and public libraries because it causes readers to interact with the book.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Tang, Greg.  MATH FOR ALL SEASONS: MIND-STRETCHING MATH RIDDLES .
    Illus by Harry Briggs.  New York: Scholastic, 2002. 40p. 0-439-21042-9; hb., $16.95
    00-057029      Gr.1-4     513

    The author of GRAPES OF MATH (Scholastic, 2001) has created another book that causes readers to rethink the way they count items.  The text is in rhyming riddle format like the previous book but this title is aimed at a younger audience and includes only addition and subtraction.  The colors of the illustrations are bright but the use of orange text to highlight the question is not easily seen against the background.  When the use of white, yellow, or green text is used, the results are better.  As in the previous book, the answers with a smaller illustration highlighting the pattern are given at the end of the book.  This is a fine choice for school and public library collections.  Check Tang’s web site at www.gregtang.com
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist

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520 UNIVERSE - ASTRONOMY - SOLAR SYSTEM - SUN/MOON/STARS

Becklake, Sue.  SPACE:  STARS, PLANETS, AND SPACECRAFT.  Illus by Brian Delf 
    and Luciano Corbella.  See and Explore series.  New York:  Dorling Kindersley, 1998.
    64p.  ISBN 0-7894-2966-7  pb. $7.95    520

    Beginning with sky watching through binoculars, Becklake goes on to talk about rocket power, engines, fuel, payload, and boosters and the stages it takes for a rocket like Ariane to enter space and return.  Also covered are how satellites work, what satellites do, what it is like to look back at earth, living in a space station, how Apollo missions mapped the moon, and moon  exploring equipment.  After a general view of the solar system, Becklake talks about studying various planets, comets and meteors, life and death of a star, black holes, and galaxies.
    Stobelaur says the large photos are a highlight of the book and help readers to understand the text.  The drawings, like a girl blowing up a balloon to explain the Big Bang theory of the universe, are helpful to understanding the concept.  Because of the illustrations, this book is great for browsing.   The book ends with sky maps of both hemispheres and an index.  Strobelaur finds the book accurate and recommends it as a good starter book for all aspects of space even though newer spacecraft and satellites are available.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

Champagne, Johanne. SCHOLASTIC ATLAS OF SPACE. Illus. by Carl Pelletier. New York:  
    Scholastic Inc., 2005.  80p.  ISBN: 0-439-67272-4  $17.95.    Gr. 9-12    j520

    ATLAS OF SPACE is an astronomy reference book with colorful, illuminating dawings and photographs. It begins with the history of the universe and describes galaxies, sun, stars and planets without an overload of scientific detail, making it appealing to a 9-12 student who must research an astronomy topic.  The book includes a glossary of terms, factual charts, and even an "activities" section.
    Judy Bennett, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood MI

Farndon, John.  AWESOME SPACE:  THE UNIVERSE.  London:  Aladdin; Brookfield, CT:
    Copper Beech/Milbrook, 2001.  32p.  ISBN 0-7613-2251-5  lib.bdg. $23.90   Gr. 4-7    523.1

    Using a question format, Farndon answers such questions as “How big is our Solar System?”   “How is gravity used to find out the size of stars?”   “Why is it called the Milky Way?”  and “What is the Big Crunch?”   Sidebars are located in yellow diamond shaped areas called "Awecome Facts" and white rectangular areas called "Space Bits."  Most of the attention is on star clusters, galaxies, the Milky Way, black holes, and active galaxies.
    Strobelaur says that the information is accurate and the best feature is that it covers a lot of astronomical subjects in a small book.  Although recommended for elementary school children, Strobelar says that the information is very brief on each subject and objects seem "smashed" together.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

Ford, Harry.  THE YOUNG ASTRONOMER. Illus. with photos.  Young Enthusiast Series.
    Dorling Kindersley, 1998.  37p.  0-7894-2061-9; hb.  $15.95   Gr. 4-7    520

    This book is full of ideas for hands on activities for students or teachers to understand about objects in the universe.  The projects are easy to construct and include making a model of the solar system with approximate sizes, making a lunar eclipse, mapping sunspots, or making a quadrant or constellation.  Ford lists equipment that is necessary to see and record night observations or to make models.  Readers learn  how to make or buy a telescope.  Also valuable is a glossary of 14 items and addresses of 6 planetariums or observatories.   The back end papers include planet statistics, tips for seeing planets with naked eye, forthcoming eclipses, nearest and brightest stars, meteor shower visibility times, and information about non stellar objects.  Like other DK books, lots of information is packed into a small space.  School and public libraries shouldn't miss this book.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI
 
Granowsky, Alvin.   NIGHT AND DAY.  My World series; Level 1.  Brookfield, CT: Copper Beech, 2001.  
    24p.  0-7613-2460-7; lib.bdg., $15.90   0-7613-2329-5; pb.,    $3.99      Gr. 1-3    ER   or   525.35

    Emerging readers learn words like dawn, morning, day, noon, sunset, evening, night, bedtime, midnight, night, and day through double-spreads that include text, photos, and drawings.  The review consists of labels on drawings and photos from the book from the aforementioned words as well as activities.  The last page shows six alarm clocks that divide the 24 hours into midnight, early morning, morning, noon, afternoon, and evening.  Purchase this easy reader to reinforce reading and the concept of time or for easy reader collections.  This is one of the best books in this series.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Jones, A. W.  INNOVATIONS IN ASTRONOMY.  Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO,
    1999.  328p.  1-57607-114-6; hb.,  $50.00     99-27927      Gr. 4-12+    520.9

     This book is divided into two parts.  Part I contains an overview of astronomy by Jones.  The chronology lists discoveries of planets and other items of note like galaxies and black holes; inventions like types of telescopes; theories of the astronomical world; and benchmark books. Further features are biographies of 30 persons connected with astronomy; a directory of organizations, observatories, and facilities;  books for further reading; and a world wide web bibliography.  Part II contains the largest portion of the book, a dictionary of terms and concepts.  Several appendixes that contain informative lists are: Astronomical Constants; Constellations; Planets (by distance from sun); Largest Natural Planetary Satellites; Nearest Stars; 20 Brightest Stars; and  Major Ground-Based Telescopes and Observatories.  Stobbelaar says this is a great reference book which answers many questions people might have about astronomy.   There is detailed information, it is well organized for ease of locating subjects.  Highly recommended for junior and senior high schools and public libraries.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

 Kerrod, Robin.  ASTRONOMY.  Illus with photos.  Young Scientist Concepts and Projects Series.   
    Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 1996, 1998. 68p.  0-8368-2083, lib.bdg., $22.60    Gr.  4-8     520

    There are other books about the solar system that show ancient and modern observatories; constellations, asteroids, meteors and comets; the relationship of the sun, moon and planets to the earth; but many of them do not have the features of this book.  There are three to five clear and colorful photos on each page which explain the text.  There are ten project sections containing experiments which follow the section of related text.  Pictures of materials and step-by-step directions with accompanying photos are helpful for carrying out the experiments.  Sometimes the segment contains two projects such as making a night sky and making a mobile.  Other projects include using a planisphere, making a sundial and a telescope.  A glossary explains terms.  The bibliography includes books, videos, and web sites.    Stobbelaar says that this book is for the more serious elementary student who wants to "do," not just read.  Kerrod provides lots of hands on activities using simple equipment but the book  is not without faults.  Some of the activities may not work because there is not enough detail due to oversimplification.  Kerrod does not mention using a red filter flashlight when observing star maps so you don't ruin your dark adaptation.  The pictures on page 11 show a camera pointed at the North Star but it doesn't say that.  The North Star is discussed on the next page.  The purpose of the 3-D star model on page 17 is unclear and is a lot of work for very little science.   On page 41, two kids are shown in two photos to show that the moon moves around the sun but the photos confuse the concept.  The boy should represent the earth and the moon should move around him.  This book can be used by teachers who have knowledge of the subject.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

Koscielniak, Bruce.  ABOUT TIME:  A FIRST LOOK AT TIME AND CLOCKS.
    New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 2004. ISBN: 13: 978-0-618-39668-9  hb. $16.00   Gr. 3-5   j529.7

    This is a fact-filled book about time.  The author includes folklore about time, history of time measurement, types of calendars as far back as 3500 B.C., and numerous examples of clocks and watches.  Time zones and the International Date Line raise questions about what time means around the world.  The book ends with a discussion about what time really is or isn't, do we really know for sure?  There are many illustrations depicting ancient cultures, the solar system and time measuring devices.  This book is very informative with interesting illustrations.
    Heidi Bretall, Bessemer Public Library Board Member, Bessemer, MI

Krupp. E. C.  THE BIG DIPPER AND YOU.  Illus. by Robin Rector Krupp.  New York:
    Morrow, 1989.  48p.  Mulberry pb, 1999.  0-688-16702-0, pb. $4.95.    Gr. 3-5     523.8

    Black and white illustrations dominate this nonfiction picture book.  A combination of text and illustrations help readers to understand the position of the North Star using an umbrella, visualize the turning of the earth as a moving merry-go-round, and understand the poles by comparing them to hub caps.  Both author and illustrator do a fine job of showing how ancient civilizations viewed the constellations.  A strength of the book is that the author uses prior knowledge to help readers to understand concepts.   A disadvantage is that there are some inaccuracies.  On pages. 26-27 the illustration shows the earth as being the same distance from the sun in winter and summer when in fact the earth is closer to the sun in winter.  On page 45, the middle diagram showing the position of the star Vega should be labeled 13,000 years, not 2,000 years.  This is a still a good introduction to the big dipper for children.   The best feature is that Krupp offers lots if information about Big Dipper, a very important constellation.  The stories are good and it is well illustrated although color would have made them more interesting.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

Nicolson, Cynthia Pratt.  DISCOVER SPACE ROCKS.  Illus. By Bill Slavin. Tonowanda, NY:  
        Kids Can Read Press, 2006. 32p.  ISBN 978-1-55337-900-3  hb. $14.95  Gr. K-2   j523.5

        Asteroids, meteorites and comets-all "space rocks"-are defined and colorfully illustrated, including some photographs. There are plenty of facts to stimulate the young astronomer; for example, what happens when meteorites actually hit the earth. Description sentences are of manageable length for the early readers.

        Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Nicolson, Cynthia Pratt.  DISCOVER THE STARS.  Illus. By Bill Slavin. Tonowanda, NY:  
       
Kids Can Read Press, 2006.  32p. ISBN 978-1-55337-898-3 hb. $14.95  Gr. K-2   j523.8

        DISCOVER THE STARS is an excellent first science reader with watercolor illustrations and actual photographs provided by NASA. The book provides a basis for further study in astronomy by introducing stars, constellations and galaxies by definition and in relation to each other in space. Descriptions and constellation diagrams are presented in a format that young readers can comprehend. Kids are invited to take a blanket and pair of binoculars outside on a clear night to explore the heavens.

         Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Pinkney, Andrea Davis.  DEAR BENJAMIN BANNEKER.  Illus. by Briain Pinkney.
    San Diego:  Harcourt, 1994.   unp. 0-15-200417-3; hb., $16.00    0-15-201892-1;
    Voyager pb, 1988, $6.00   93-31162    Gr3+    92  or  520

     Pinkney's illustrations are fine examples of his scratchboard technique which is well suited to this subject.  The author's note at the beginning of the book informs readers about Banneker who was  a self-taught mathematician and astronomer who may have been America's first black man of science. Other accomplishments, not included in the book, are given.  The text emphasizes that Banneker, who grew up in Maryland as a free person, was always curious.  Much of the book is devoted to his preparing an almanac and the importance of this and other almanacs of his  time.  Bannaker published an almanac from 1791-97.  Banneker sent a copy of his almanac, to Thomas Jefferson when he was Secretary of State with a letter explaining that "all black people could study and learn as he had–if only they were free to do so."  Part of Jefferson's reply is also included.  There are multiple uses for this book in the curriculum: astronomy, biography, Thomas Jefferson,  Black History Month, and when learning about uses of almanacs.  The hardback should already be in school and public library collections but now the paperback makes it affordable for classroom collections.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Reeves, Hubert, et al.  ORIGINS: COSMOS, EARTH AND MANKIND.  Trans by Richard
    Seaver.  New York:   Arcade, 1988.  Dist. by Little Brown & Co.  1st English Edition. 210 p.
    1-55970-408X, hb.   $22.95.  97-27830.  Upper Middle School - Adult.  523.1

     This unique "play" in three acts covers the beginning of the universe from chaos to the human conquest.  The "play" incorporates the disciplines of astronomy, physics, chemistry, paleontology and anthropology.  The scenes of this play are extremely well focused questions and responses by three eminent scientists (astrophysics, organic chemistry, and anthropology).  Considering the scope of the question of origins, the very basic questions asked and the brief but complete answers are easy to read.  The dialogue does presume prior knowledge in many of the responses when various peoples of history are mentioned.
    This is an intriguing book for both the beginner and the seasoned in science.  The questions asked are thought provoking and the responses carry the play along quickly, particularly after Act 1 so that one moves from before the universe to early man (with a necessary prologue and interesting epilogue) in two hundred and ten pages.  As this is presented as a play of origins, note that there is no index or references.
     Rita Hrecz, PhD.,  Northern Michigan University Dept. of Education,

Richardson, Adele.  VENUS:  FIRST FACTS.  Illus. by Juliette Peters.  Mankato, MN:  
    Capstone Press, 2005.  24p.  ISBN: 0-7368-3698-5   Gr. K-3    523.42

    VENUS, a small, hardcover book for "first reports," describes the scope and  content of this introduction to our solar system. Facts are presented simply by use of drawings, charts, photographs and glossary. Further reading sources and a website are recommended for the curious child who wants to know more.
Judy Bennett, Library Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library 

Ridpath, Ian.  STARS AND PLANETS: THE VISUAL GUIDE TO THE NIGHT SKY VIEWED
    FROM AROUND THE WORLD.  Illus. with photos.  Eyewitness Handbooks Series.  Dorling Kindersley, 
    1998.  223p. 0-7894-3521-7, pb., $18.95.    0-7894-3560-8, hb. $20.95  98-11961     Gr.  4-12+    520

    There are four parts to the book: an introduction to astronomy, guide to the 9 planets of the solar system, alphabetical entries for 88 constellations, and monthly star maps.  Color illustrations and maps appear on every page, sometimes there are two or three per page which at times is overwhelming.   It is  possible to use this book as a guide at night to identify constellations because a drawing links the stars to show the animal or character it represents and the longitude and latitude are given as well as the time it is highest in the sky at 10 pm.  Ridpath has provided a wealth of information in a well organized format that is small enough to be used as a field guide.  This is an excellent reference book for information about the stars and planets for middle schools, high schools, and for adults.  Purchase for school and public libraries or for home use.  Highly recommended.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

Rockwell, Anne.  OUR STARS.  San Diego: Silver Whistle/Harcourt, 1999.  24p.
    0-15-201868-9; hb., $13.00.  97-49518       Gr. K-3        523.8

    Rockwell uses gouache and silkscreen to illustrate this picture book which answers children's questions about astronomy.  Sentences are short and the illustrations help children to understand the text.  This is a good first book to help children understand astronomy.  Sometimes when authors try too simplify  difficult concepts, inaccuracies happen.  One example that occurs in this book is that meteors don't burn up, they vaporize.  Nevertheless, this is a worthwhile purchase for public and elementary school libraries.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

Vogt, Gregory L.  DEEP SPACE ASTRONOMY.  Brookfield, CT:  Twenty-first Century/
    Millbrook, 1999.  79p.  0-7613-1369-9; lib.bdg., $24.90   99-11428  Gr. 4-7   520

    Beginning with Galileo through the launch of the Hubble Telescope in 1993 and the planned launch of the Next Generation Space Telescope planned for 2007, Vogt discusses instruments that look at the solar system.  Some topics covered are light waves, radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet light, x-rays, gamma rays, stars, stellar nurseries, supernova, planetary nebulae, black holes, quasars, galaxies, the and the Big Bang theory.  Added information includes a glossary; list of space observatories; list of 29 major astronomy missions between 1957 and 1997 with highlights, mission, and target; a list of further reading, and URLs for six Internet resources; and an index.
     Strobelar says this book "helps children understand how astronomers use instruments to learn about objects in the universe.”   He recommends this book to students and teachers because “Vogt covers complex subjects in a clear understandable fashion and gives good examples that relate to everyday things.”
    GUEST REVIEWER: Scott Stobbelaar; Director, Shiras Planetarium, Marquette, MI
    Science teacher, Marquette Senior High School, MAPS, Marquette, MI

Wells, Robert E.  HOW DO YOU KNOW WHAT TIME IT IS?  Morton Grove, IL: Whitman, 2002. 
    30p.  ISBN 0-8075-7939-4; hb. $14.95  ISBN 0-8075-7940-8; pb. $6.95      Gr. K-4     529.7

    This is an informative and interesting way to learn about time.  The first sentence is “TIME is a mystery” and goes on to say that it can’t be seen or heard.  Readers learn about early clocks, Egyptian lunar calendars, why the solar calendar fell short because “seasons are not measured by the moon but by Earth’s orbit of the SUN!, the solar year and how Julius Caesar and the Romans “began using the Egyptian solar calendar,” and how the leap year was added “every 4th year to account for the ‘extra’ ¼ day,”  and the importance of time zones.”  The cartoon-like illustrations are childlike but convey the message of the text so primary students can understand the concept.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
 

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530 PHYSICS

Bartholomew, Alan. ELECTRIC MISCHIEF. Ill. by Lynn Bartholomew. Tonawanda, NY:
    Kids Can, 2002. 48p.   1-5507-4923-4; hb., $12.95      Gr. 4-8      537

    Any young wannabe Einstein will love this book. Creativity has no limits with this author.  Bartholomew offers instructions on making numerous battery-powered gadgets for kids, young and old.  There are directions for making everything from an electronic backscratcher, to an illuminated fork, a robot hand or even electric dice.  His last chapter offers, "More Mischief" for those readers who want a bigger challenge, encouraging the child to combine what he has learned up to that point and create his own customized gadgets.  Not only does the author include all materials and tools necessary for the projects, but he outlines in simple and thorough detail, how to make battery connections. The illustrated examples are colorful and easy-to-follow. Kids, Moms and
Dads can't help but get charged up over this 2002 publication.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Burton, Jane and Kim Taylor. THE NATURE AND SCIENCE OF ENERGY.
    Illus. with  photos.  Exploring the Science of Nature Series.  Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens,
    1998.  32p.   0-83681941-1; lib.bdg., $21.27.    97-34236   Gr. 3-6    530

    This addition to the Exploring the Science of Nature Series will hit the bull's eye for a young scientist who desires information about energy.  It describes different kinds of energy and explores some of its properties as well as the different forms it can take.  Burton and Taylor take a wealth of information down to an elementary level so it can be deciphered for students as young as third grade. This title would be most valuable for a science report or reference for a science project.   Some of the marvelous photographs are full page and thoroughly compliment the text. Also included in the last pages are activities that the readers can carry out along with a glossary, a list of additional books on the same subject and a list of videos and web sites. This is a fine addition to a science collection.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Granowsky, Alvin.   COLORS.  My World series; Level 1.  Brookfield, CT:  Copper Beech, 2001.
    24p.  0-7613-2458-5; lib.bdg., $15.90  0-7613-2292-2; pb., $3.99   PreS- Gr. 2    ER or  535.6

    Each of the ten colors in this easy reader receives a double page spread except for black and white, which share pages.  Photos and drawings express the color and the sentences describe objects that contain those colors.  Readers are involved because there is at least one question about each color.  A small square picture is next to each color word.  Except for a blue peacock, almonds, and  a zebra, the object is the same color as the background and fades into it so that the object is not clearly delineated; i.e., tomato on red, banana on yellow, grapes against purple, etc.  The peas are especially difficult to recognize.  Because this is an easy reader, some specific words are not used.  The almonds are called nuts and the jack-o-lantern is called a pumpkin.  At the end of the book, nine colored squares are labeled with the color word.  On the next page, readers are asked to name colors in six pictures and then to make up a story using words that are labels for the pictures.  The last picture shows three Venn diagrams of six colors and what they look like combined.  Despite the recognition problem in the small photos, his book is still a suitable easy reader.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

MacDonald, Fiona.  ALBERT EINSTEIN: GENIUS BEHIND THE THEORY OF RELATIVITY
Woodbridge, CT: Blackbirch/Gale, 2000. 64 p. 1-56711-330-3 hb. $27.44     Gr. 6-12      j530   

    One of eight titles in the "Giants of Science Series," this title contains a chronology, glossary, bibliography, Internet references, and index.  The illustrations are drawings and black and white photos.  Albert Einstein's theories of relativity profoundly changed our ideas about how the universe is structured and the impact of his ideas is felt in nearly every scientific field.  These complex theories are presented in an understandable form that is and age appropriate and as part of the larger focus on his life.  The culture of the late 19th century to pre-WWII Europe from the Jewish perspective is especially well depicted.  Einstein's humor, philosophy and character traits are brought to life in margin quotes from his writings, lectures and letters.  He was a non-assuming, modest person who was not very interested in school.  He was also a member of a minority and rather socially inept. Many students who have problems in school or social situations should identify with him.  The book is also attractive to slower readers because it is broken into short segments, has wide margins and makes liberal use of illustrations.  This would make an excellent start to class discussion on the morals of nuclear weaponry, how an individual's ideas can affect society as a whole, how we balance desired and undesired effects of new technology, etc.
    Carolyn Anderson; Retired elementary teacher, L’Anse Public Library Advisory Board

Mason, Adrienne. SOUND OFF. Illus. by Pat Cupples. Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can Press,
    2002. 1-55337-058-9; $6.95 hb.   20019042418   Gr. 1-4   534 

    You can't judge a book by it's cover, that's for sure.  Glancing at this title, one would strongly suspect that it is an easy picture book.  Not so.  Although the book is fictionalized and could be shelved either in the easies or nonfiction, it contains too much good information to be treated lightly. Lu and Clancy play detective when Lu's little sister, Sophie is missing. They spring into action to find her and at the same time, the twosome learns about the science of sound. Kids will love the content as the book explains how to deterimine how far away thunderstorms can be, how sound vibration is used to make a bug buzzer, how to build musical instruments, how to build a screamer, and more.The illustrations are not only appealing, but help in discerning what is needed to carry out the listed projects. It definitely sounds like a sound addition about sound, wouldn't you say? SOUND OFF!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Richards, Jon.  LIGHT & SIGHT.  Illus. by Ian Moores & Ian Thompson.  Brookfield, CT:
    Copper Beach/Millbrook, 1999.  32p.  0-7613-3255-3 hb. $15.00.  99-29704   Gr.3-6    535

    Through large print and bright photographs this book offers experiments in light and sight for the novice scientist. Each two-page spread covers a separate experiment followed with an explanation of why it works. LIGHT & SIGHT is written in an easy-to-under-stand fashion and it conveniently lists the materials necessary to complete each experiment. Most of the items can be found around the house. The format is far more engaging pictorially than traditional books about simple science experiments.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

 White, Michael.  ISAAC NEWTON: DISCOVERING LAWS THAT GOVERN THE UNIVERSE.   
    Woodbridge, CT:   Blackbirch, 1999.  64p. 1-56711-326-5; lib.bdg. $18.95    Gr. 5-8       j 530.092

     This book clearly explains Isaac Newton's life and times and his discoveries as they relate to our modern world.  Photographs and graphics colorfully and appropriately illustrate the text.  Readable print and page lay-out, a chronology of dates, scientific terms, index, additional books and web sites make this bright, readable book a useful addition to any library.  Newton's PRINCIPIA, and his laws that still govern our universe, become clear.   Young adults and readers of all ages will appreciate this concisely written and delightfully illustrated biography.
    Sally Shan, formerly Board member, Superiorland Library Cooperative

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550 EARTH SCIENCES

Burton, Jane and Kim Taylor. THE NATURAL SCIENCE OF ROCKS.  Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 1998.  
    32p.   0-8368-1945-4, lib.bdg.,    $19.93.  97-30213    Gr. 2-6+    552

     Banish the thought of having rocks in your bonnet after reading this one!  This appealing read will have its young readers believing that geology can be fun and interesting.  The authors use an easy-to-understand way with photographs so real you want to touch them to feel the texture of what is being defined.  The authors explore such aspects of rocks as their location, how they are formed, what they are made of, their appearance, how they can be dated and their changing nature.  Read this one for PEAT's sake!
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

Christian, Spencer and Antonia Felix.  IS THERE A DINOSAUR IN YOUR BACKYARD?
    THE WORLD'S MOST FASCINATING FOSSILS, ROCKS, AND MINERALS.
    Illus. by Abe Blashko and Jessica Wolk-Stanley.  New York: Wiley, 1998. 120p.
    World of Wonders Series.   0-471-19616-9; pb., $12.95     Gr. 3-8+     552

    "What's in a Name?" is an invaluable worksheet for students studying dinosaurs because it gives Greek and Roman root words and how students can translate dinosaur names because they often describe the dinosaur's appearance.  The title may be misleading because only nine pages deal with dinosaurs; instead, it is a good beginning geology primer.  The black and white sketches make lessons such as ancient rock tools, rock identification and cleavage, fossil making, and meteorites interesting.  Good geologic time charts lead up to rock and mineral collecting.  This book is for browsing because it has many sidebars with unique facts.  An appendix, extensive glossary, and index add to the usefulness of this book.
     Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Facchini, Fiorenzo.  EARLY HUMANS:  A DAY WITH HOMO HABILIS
Facchini, Fiorenzo.  EARLY HUMANS:  A DAY WITH HOMO ERECTUS
Facchini, Fiorenzo.  EARLY HUMANS:  A DAY WITH NEANDERTHAL MAN
Facchini, Fiorenzo.  EARLY HUMANS:  A DAY WITH HOMO SAPIENS.  Illus. by
    Alessandro Baldanzi or Georgio Bacchin.  Brookfield, CT:  Twenty-First Century Books,
    2003.  48 p.   ISBN:  0-7613-2765-7; lib. bdg., $23.90 each.  Grades 4-8  

    This is a series of four books on early humans beginning with Homo Habilis, who lived 2 million years ago, then Homo Erectus of 400,000 years ago, then Neanderthal Man of 70,000 years ago, and finally Homo Sapiens of 15,000 years ago.  Each book contains a glossary and an index.  The first part of each book illustrates through photos of fossils, tool remnants, and maps what was actually known about each species.  The explanations are clear and the illustrations are very well done.  I do find fault with the second part of each book, which attempts to describe an imaginary day in the life of each species.  The concepts, language, and activities are not realistic, but instead are based on modern societal patterns.  In each case the illustrations of the imaginary day are surrounded by artistic and cultural artifacts of a much more recent society.  The author’s intent was to show the development of human artistic expression and the evolution of human culture, but it is so very much out of time of the period being described that it is misleading to the reader.  The second part of each book makes up about 2/3 of the entire book and seems to me to be quite fanciful.  I do not recommend the purchase of these books for a school library.
    Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Library Board of Directors

Jenkins Steve.  THE TOP OF THE WORLD:  CLIMBING MOUNT EVEREST.
    Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.   32p.  0-395-94218-7; hb., $16.00      98-42748
    Gr. 1-5+   796.52       PAULIN'S PICKS

    This is an exemplary science picture book.  A multitude of information is presented in an interesting manner and the cut paper collage illustrations catch the spirit of the text.  Information includes:  Sir George Everest, the city of  Katmandu, the Shepas people of Nepal, yaks, famous climbers, supplies, levels of mountain life, trash left behind by climbers, icefall, rivers of ice, oxygen and breathing, avalanches and the seven summits.    Maps, records and a bibliography are helpful.  This is a book for readers of any age who are interested in mountain climbing anywhere but especially in the Himalayas.  In a recent measuring, it was revealed that Mt. Everest is several feet taller than formerly reported. This recent development should not affect this book's chances as a Caldecott Medal contender because the new findings may or may not be accurate and this book was accurate at the time of printing.   Highly recommended for elementary and middle schools as well public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Rustad, Martha E. H. Gail Saunders-Smith, Ed.  HOW'S THE WEATHER? TODAY IS RAINY.  
       
Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2006.  24p. 978-0-7368-5344-6 hb. $14.95    Gr. K-1     j550           

        This book is an interesting and informative look at rain.  I liked the photographs of children in the rain.  Any young child would be able to relate to walking in the rain or being stuck inside.  The simple text; "The sun shines. We see a rainbow." matches the photos beautifully; a huge rainbow over a tree covered hill.  The book has a glossary.  Internet sites and future reading suggestions are included.
        Heidi Bretall, Preschool teacher and Bessemer Public Llibrary board member

 

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551 VOLCANOES - EARTHQUAKES

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551.46 OCEANS

Bright, Michael.  AWESOME OCEANS:  AMAZING ANIMAL JOURNEYS. Brookfield, CT:
            Copper Beech Books, 2003  32p.  ISBN 0-761328149 hb. $23.90    Gr. K-3    j551

            This is a fact-filled book about the migrations of various ocean animals.  It is filled with maps, photographs and illustrations of a variety of ocean-dwelling fish, mammals, reptiles and birds.  There is both a glossary and an index.  This non-fiction book will appeal to the “curious” child and will be useful in studies about oceans, animal habitats, and migrations.  Recommended for library collections.
           
Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Board of Directors

Gibbons, Gail. EXPLORING THE DEEP, DARK SEA . Illus. by author. Boston:
    Little, Brown, 1999. 32 p.  0-316-30945-1; hb., $14.95.  98-14443    K-6+   551.46

    You probably know that water covers almost three-fourths of our planet's surface, but have you ever seen what lies far beneath the waves? Now is your chance to explore the vastly unexplored world beneath the ocean's surface. Travel along with Gibbons and you will harvest a wealth of information about underwater topography and sea life. The author also elaborates on the three ocean zones while the frosting on the cake is an illustrated timeline for deep sea diving. The illustrations are traditionally Gibbons; colorful, simple and easy to understand. Another success story for this author/illustrator of more than ninety books that turn fact into entertainment.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

McElroy, Lisa Tucker with help from Russell T. Mead.  MEET MY GRANDMOTHER:
    SHE’S A DEEP-SEA EXPLORER.  Photos by Joel Benjamin and Mark Gardner.
    Grandmothers at Work series.  Brookfield, CT: Millbrook, 2000.  32p.  0-7613-1720-1;
    lib.bdg., $22.90.    00-23091     Gr. 2-4       578.77

    This book is as appealing as the other books in the series about Sandra Day O’Connor and Diane Feinstein.  Without being didactic, the message comes across loudly and clearly:  mature women can make outstanding contributions to society.
    Unlike the previous two books in the series, the grandchild in this title is a boy.  Russ’s G-mom is a famous marine biologist who is also a writer of books for children and adults on this subject.  Earle is shown with her computer in her office, on board a research ship, in the ocean, and sharing her love of ocean life with her grandchildren.  Eight suggestions “If You Want to be a Deep-Sea Explorer” are given at the end of the book.  This is an excellent book to show that gender and age don’t keep women from making a contribution in their career fields.  The only distracting item about this series is dividing pages into two colors in an East/West direction and overlaying them with full-page text and providing some headings in colors that fade into the background color.  An annoying photo in this book is a picture of the children and their G-mom looking at a jellyfish in an aquarium and nearby text which says “Jellyfish glow in the dark!”  The picture on the opposite page shows a back void except for the reflection of G-mom in the glass.  The last picture in the book shows them looking into the tank at glowing jellyfishThese pictures should have been reversed.  This problem aside, this is an excellent series and librarians and young readers will eagerly look forward to the next one.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Parker, Jane.  SAVING OUR WORLD: OCEANS.   Saving our World Series. Brookfield:  Copper             
    Beech/Millbrook, 1999. 32p.  0-7613-3259-6; lib.bdg. $21.90    99-35801    Gr. 2-8.     551.46

    The attractive layout of this book, with colorful photos and illustrations intermingled with the text, will catch the eye of young readers. Throughout the book are stimulating "Talking Points"" aimed at raising greater awareness and provoking discussion about important environmental topics and issues.  Filled with straightforward facts and short, informative paragraphs, this book will keep the interest of students and encourage their concern for our earth and oceans.  The five chapters discuss what the oceans are, life in the oceans, ocean bounty (treasures and harvest), damaging the oceans, and solutions.  It ends with ideas on how to help save the oceans.  An excellent addition to libraries, this eye-catching volume will add to any student’s knowledge of oceans.
    Kathy Abbott; library aide, E. B. Holman School, Atlantic Mine, MI

Taylor, Leighton.  THE INDIAN OCEAN. .Photos by:  Norbert Wu.  Woodbridge, CT:
    Blackbirch, 1999.  48p.  1-56711-242-0, lib. bdg., $16.95.  98-19654   Gr. 2-7.    551.46

    Can you imagine an ocean so large that it washes the shores of Africa,  Australia, and Asia at the same time?  You need NOT imagine if you read Taylor's book.  The text and photographs are produced in an intense, clear, concise and easy-to-grasp manner.  They present information about the Indian Ocean, it location, physical environment, animal life, islands and mysteries.  Although it is targeted for the middle elementary level, the glossary and bibliography make it valuable to older students as well.  It would be just plain fun for anyone who manages to spot it while checking to see what's new.  Other books in the series are:  THE ATLANTIC OCEAN; THE CARIBBEAN SEA; THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA; THE PACIFIC OCEAN, and  THE RED SEA.
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

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551.6 WEATHER

Allen, Jean.  BLIZZARDS.  Natural Disasters series.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone High-
    Interest, 2001.  48p.  0-7368-899-X; lib.bdg., $21.26     Gr. 3-9    551.55

    Numerous full-page color photos add to the appeal of this title in a series that includes FOREST FIRES, FLOODS, and TSUNAMIS .  Some famous blizzards covered in the book are the Armistice Day blizzard in 1940, the Alberta Clipper of 1941, the Blizzard of 1888, the Storm of the Century in 1993, and the Blizzard of 1996.  Readers learn about what makes a blizard, how to survive in one, how they are predicted, as well as information about wind chill, frostbite, and hypothermia.  A section called "Words to Know" includes seven items, the "To Learn More" bibliography includes five items including Murphy's BLIZZARD (Scholastic, 2000) which is an excellent companion book. There are four "Useful Addresses," and five "Internet Sites."  An index, map, and wind chill chart are also helpful.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Friend, Sandra. EARTH'S WILD WINDS.  Illus with photos.  Brookfield, CT: 
    Twenty-First Century, 2002.   64p.  0-7613-2673-1; hb.    Gr. 5-8    551.51

    This title will make it a breeze for any student having to do a science report relating to unlimited things related to the subject of the wind.  This fact-filled title includes information escalating from breezes to hurricanes to cyclones. The author reveals the useful ways winds influence human lives as well as including the different ways that people have been victims of this natural phenomenon.  Throughout the book sidebars offer additional interesting information and keywords in the text are printed in  bold face so they can then be defined in the glossary.  Also included are charts and maps that add to the value of the content as well as help students who want to do online research.  This is a real treasure that helps prove that Friend did HER homework!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library

Granowsky, Alvin.  RAIN OR SHINE.   My World series; Level 1.  Brookfield, CT: 
    Copper Beech, 2001.  24p.  0-7613-2460-7; lib.bdg., $15.90   0-7613-2329-5; pb., 
    $3.99  Gr. 1-3      ER   or  551.6

    The headings in these double page spreads include weather, hot, cold, sun, clouds, rain, wind, storm, thunder and lightning, snow, and the rainbow.   A vocabulary review of weather at the end of this easy reader places labels on photos and drawings.  Created for emerging readers, this book makes a good addition to weather units or easy reader collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Singer, Marilyn.  ON THE SAME DAY IN MARCH: A TOUR OF THE WORLD’S WEATHER.  
    Illus by Frane’ Lessac.  New York:  HarperCollins, 2000.  40p.  0-06-028187-1; hb., $15.95  
    0-06-028188-X; lib.bdg., $15.89   0-06-443528-8; pb., $5.95       Gr. K-3+      551.6

    Beginning with polar bears in the Arctic, readers learn what it is like “On the same day in March…”  The book follows the same poetic pattern and introduces what happens in Alberta, Canada; Paris, France; New York City; the Texas Panhandle; Xian, China; Darjeeling, India; Central Thailand; Northern Kenya; the Amazon Basin, Brazil; Darwin, Australia; Patagonia, Argentina; and Antarctica.  A few of the pages only list a location and a descriptive sentence about it like the Nile Valley, Louisiana bayou, Dakar, Senegal; and Barbados.  In “A Note from the Author,”  Singer tells about the journey of 365 days that it takes to make a trip around the sun.   This is an excellent way to learn about world geography and comparing weather around the world on a single day.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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567 FOSSILS AND DINOSAURS

Aliki.. WILD AND WOOLLY MAMMOTHS.  Illus by the author.  HarperCollins,
    1998.  40p.  Revised edition.   32p.  0-06-026276-1; hb., $14.95.  0-06-446179-3
    pb., $5.95.     94-4817    PS-Gr.3    569.6

    Focusing on the woolly mammoth, this book is a brief  but accurate history of the probiscideans, the tusked Elephantidae family of ancient mammals..  Wonderful, imaginative scenes (crayon/chalk) and graphics (map, time line, specimens) show the frozen earth of fifty thousand years ago.  One picture of a woolly mammoth falling into a deep crevasse foreshadows it's intact discovery in Siberia in 1900.  Early man's thorough consumption of this mammoth as his complete survival "supermarket" is a major theme.  The bones of 95 mammoths were required for a tundra shelter.  Perhaps that is why the eyes of the mammoth seem to have a far-reaching sadness as they survey the glacial steppes.  Woolly mammoths  were hunted in the same manner as the American bison and were as well used by early hunters.   Except for the scientific terms, the reading level is easy enough for third graders but will appeal to anyone interested in this topic.  Recommended for elementary,  middle school, and public youth library collections
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Aliki.. WILD AND WOOLLY MAMMOTHS.  Illus by the author.  HarperCollins, 1998. 
    32p.  0-06-026276-1; hb. $14.95    0-06-446179-3; pb. $5.95   Pre-Gr.3    569.6

    Help your child or your classroom travel back in time two million years ago to an age when woolly mammoths roamed the earth. Travel with Aliki in her fascinating book, to a time which until now we could only imagine. With her easy to understand, but informative text, the mammoth becomes vividly alive. Learn about  recent discoveries of 11,000 year old mammoths found frozen in Siberia with live bacteria still in their stomachs!  The text is packed with so many interesting facts, adults will enjoy reading it as much as early elementary students. The print is large for young readers and each page is filled with colorful illustrations by Aliki which help support the story.  The reader not only learns interesting facts about what life was like two million years ago, but  they learn an important lesson about how the mammoth became extinct and how we can help to protect animals living today.  Aliki's book is a "must have" for any home or school library.
    Kathy Pompo, Lakeview Elementary School, Negaunee, MI

Arnold, Caroline.  GIANT SHARK:  MEGALODON, PREHISTORIC SUPER PREDATOR.
          Illus. by Laurie Caple.  New York:  Clarion Books, 2000.  32 p.
          ISBN: 0395914191; 9780395914199 hb. $16.00.    JUV    NF   567

          This book describes the largest shark that ever lived, the megalodon.  Illustrations show the size of this shark compared to other sharks and whales, and further explains the life of this shark and why it disappeared.  This book will appeal to children in younger elementary grades who want to find out about ancient sharks.
         
Denise Engel, Director, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Atkins, Jeannine.  MARY ANNING AND THE SEA DRAGON.  Illus. by Michael Dooling.
    New York: Farrar, 1999.  32p.  0-374-34840-5; hb., $16.00.   Gr. K-5     92  or  560.92

    Mary Anning quit school at the age of ten to earn money after her father died.  It was her father who taught her to be observant.  While at the beach looking for curiosities to sell, Mary found a row of teeth in the waves and brushed until she uncovered a head.  By the next spring a backbone emerged and Lord Henley gave her money to pry it out.  After a year the fossil was revealed.   The story ends with Mary contemplating the future.  In the afterword, readers learn that Mary dug out an ichthyosaur and later she discovered the first plesiosaur found in England.  Mary eventually became a paleontologist. This book will be read by dinosaur lovers and is a good role model for girls.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Benton, Michael. ARMORED GIANTS. Awesome Dinosaur series.  Illus. by James Field.
     Brookfield, CT:  Copper Beech, 2001. 32p.  0-7613-2161-6; lib.bdg.,  $22.90.
     00-52388   Gr 3-7   567.915

    Can you believe that the stegosaurus is known as the most stupid dinosaur?  It had a brain the size of a walnut.  More amazing yet, it had a second "brain" in the hip region, which operated the hind legs and tail.  Dinosaur buffs will delight in this title that takes a fresh look at the bones,(a typical dinosaur had about 350 bones in its skull and skeleton as contrasted to only 250 bones in the human skeleton),plates, spikes, spines and clubs that made up these tank-like dinosaurs.  Complimenting the text and expanding the knowledge, are clear and colorful timelines that show when armored dinosaurs lived.  Additionally, simple maps point out major fossil finds. A great book for young, enthusiastic paleontologists—no bones about it!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Benton, Michael. DUCKBILLS AND BONEHEADS.  Awesome Dinosaur series.
    Illus. by James Field.  Brookfield, CT: Copper Beech, 2001.  32 p.
    0-7613-2160-8; lib.bdg.,  $22.90    00-52389   Gr. 3-7    567.914

    Awesome is right!  Not a shelf-sitter, to be sure.  This exciting and colorful book is filled with beautifully rendered artwork, fascinating facts, "zoom-in" boxes and a glossary that easily explains dinosaur vocabulary.  Benton concentrates on this different type of dinosaur, highlighting particular features of this breed as well as listing the latest discoveries.  Colorful maps show exactly where dinosaur fossils have been found and a clear and precise timeline shows when duckbills and boneheads lived.  Did you know this particular kind of dinosaur was a plant eater?  That some duckbills had as many as 2,000 teeth? Or that the crests on their heads made noises?  These fascinating dinosaurs may have been at home in Mongolia, but his book will feel right at home in the hands of any young dinosaur enthusiast.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Benton, Michael.  GIANT PLANT EATERS.  Awesome Dinosaurs series.  Illus. by James Field. 
    Brookfield, CT : Copper Beech, 2001. 32 p.  0-7613-2159-4 lib.bdg. $22.90    Gr. 3-7    567.913

    This book concentrates on the prehistoric giants who preferred salad for their lunch.  At the start of the age of dinosaurs it is believed that the continents were all joined together as one great super continent called Pangaea, so this made for one gigantic garden space for these one-day fossils to gather their greens. Benton takes a look at just how large the Brachiosaurus, the Diplodocus and the Mamanorosaurus really were, how much the Camarasaurus had to eat to stay alive, which plant eater had the largest neck and howfast--or slow- these gentle giants moved.  The zoom-in boxes provide quick and detailed information while the beautiful artwork brings it all together.  This cool title might just make a vegetarian ...as well as a book lover... out of the reader.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Benton, Michael. MEAT EATERS. Awesome Dinosaur series.  Illus. by James Field.
    Brookfield, CT; Copper Beach, 2001. 32p. 0-7613-2158-6; lib.bdg., $22.90
    00-52386  Gr. 3-7    567.912

    The meat eaters were part of a dinosaur group called the theropods.  How about that!  They ranged from small turkey-sized dinosaurs to the awesome Tyrannosaurus rex.  Most interesting!  And there is a lot more to come for those who choose this title in the series.  Everything from what makes a meat eater, to how they balanced, their habits, the manner in which they hunted, and where they probably lived.  There is lots of information for a 32-page book.  There is also a comprehensive glossary, timelines, maps, "zoom-in boxes," and striking artwork.  This title will definitely satiate the appetites of dinosaur lovers, be it meat or otherwise!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Berkowitz, Jacob.  JURASSIC POOP:  WHAT DINOSAURS (AND OTHERS ) LEFT BEHIND.  
       
Illus. by Steve Mack. Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can Press, 2006.  ISBN-10: 1553378601 hb. $14.95    
       
Gr. 2-6    j567.9

        Left by animals long ago, doo-doo survived through the ages.  The author describes what started out as stinky, but now is frozen, dried or petrified over the ages as great evidence for modern scientists to study.  These clues can help solve mysteries of ancient life on earth.  Funny and informative, this book is jam packed with amazing facts, stories and activities for kids.  Illustrations range from silly to serious and bring fun into learning.  Recommended for kids in grades 2-6 using public and school libraries.
            Amy Becker, Technical Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Bishop, Nic.  DIGGING FOR BIRD-DINOSAURS:  AN EXPEDITION TO MADAGASCAR.  
    Illus with photos.  Scientists in the Field series.  Boston:  Houghton, 2000.  48p.  0-395-96056-8; hb. 
    $16.00   0-618-19682-X; pb.     99-36145     Gr. 3-7+    567.9

     This book is in the same series as Montgomery’s THE SNAKE SCIENTIST (Houghton, 1999).  Cathy Forester, a paleontologist at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, studies fossils and is tries to make a connection between birds and dinosaurs.  The text, accompanied by sharp color photos, explains what a paleontologist does.  Much of the book is devoted to Forester’s 1998 trip to Madagascar where she found fossils, put the clues together, and prepared  a museum expedition.  This first rate science book is also a career book about paleontology that can be used to show women in non-traditional careers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Bowman, Donna H.  DID DINOSAURS EAT PEOPLE?: AND OTHER QUESTIONS KIDS
      HAVE ABOUT DINOSAURS
.  Illus. by Marjorie Dumortier. Minneapolis, MN: Picture Window Books, 
     2010.  24p.  ISBN: 978-1-4048-5527-4 hb. $18.99.      Gr. K - 3     j567

      Kids love dinosaurs!  This book is a question and answer book about dinosaurs.  The questions were submitted by elementary students aged 6 to 8 years old.  The author answers the questions and a nifty picture goes along with the answer.  The book is part of a series of Kids' Questions books featuring the moon, rattlesnakes, and teeth.  Picture Window Books publishes informational books
that are designed to get the attention of young readers who are curious about so many different topics.
      Christine Collins, Library Director, L'Anse Area School and Public Library

Christian, Spencer and Antonia Felix.  IS THERE A DINOSAUR IN YOUR BACKYARD?
    THE WORLD'S MOST FASCINATING FOSSILS, ROCKS, AND MINERALS.
    Illus. by Abe Blashko and Jessica Wolk-Stanley.  World of Wonders Series.  New York:
    Wiley, 1998. 120p.   0-471-19616-9; pb., $12.95   97-53177.   Gr. 3-8+     552

     "What's in a Name?" is an  invaluable worksheet for students studying dinosaurs because it gives Greek and Roman root words and how students can translate dinosaur names because they often describe the dinosaur's appearance. The title may be misleading because only nine pages deal with dinosaurs; instead, it  is a good beginning geology primer.  The black and white sketches make lessons such as ancient rock tools, rock identification and cleavage, fossil making, and meteorites interesting.  Good geologic time charts lead up to rock and mineral collecting.  This book is for browsing because it has many sidebars with unique facts.  An appendix, extensive glossary, and index add to the usefulness of this book.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Dixon, Dougal.  DELTADROMEUS AND OTHER SHORELINE DINOSAURS.
     
Dinosaur Find Series.   Illus. By Steve Weston and James Field.  Minneapolis, MN:  
   
   Picture Window Books, 2004.  24p. 1-4048-0669-5 lib.bdg. $16.95   Gr. K-3   567.9

      This book is presented in an interesting format featuring eight dinosaurs that lived near water.  The text is large and the vocabulary is simple.  The full page illustrations are painted or computer generated.  The information page includes a photograph of a modern animal that compares to the dinosaur on the opposite page.  There is a glossary in the back of the book.  Any teacher or librarian would be happy to have this book in their non-fiction collection.  Children who already love dinosaurs will want the entire Dinosaur Find Series.
      Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Dixon, Dougal.  DOUGAL DIXON'S DINOSAURS.  Second edition.  Honesdale, PA:
    Boyd Mills, 1998.  160p.   1-56397-722-2; hb., $19.95    Gr. 3-7+   567.9

    Detailed information about 25 kinds of dinosaurs is given.  Sidebars give phonetic spellings, length, height, weight, food, and location, periods lives, picture, size relationship to humans.  Of special information is a four-page chart of dinosaurs in their time periods, chart of geological periods, information about dinosaur hunters. A 6-page glossary is helpful. Dixon's book is recommended by the Dinosaur Society.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Dixon, Dougal. TYRANNOSAURUS AND OTHER DINOSAURS OF NORTH AMERICA.
          Illus. by Steve Weston and James Field.  Minneapolis, MN: Picture Window Books, 2007.
          24 p. ISBN: 9781404822658 lib.bdg. $23.93.   Gr. K-3    Easy Reader j 567.9097

          This book focuses on some of the dinosaurs that lived on land that now is North America.  The book's layout features many visual clues for the young reader.  Meat-eating or plant-eating dinosaurs are indicated by colored boxes, dinosaurs are compared in size to a chicken, an adult or an elephant, and they are also compared with photographs of an animal of today.  Full color illustrations fill one side of the two-page spread.  There are two illustrators for the book, and two different types of illustrations; a drawing and a more "photographic" style drawing.  The "photographic" drawings are more pleasing and I wonder why the publisher chose to have two different styles.  This does not distract from the overall quality of the book however.  Children in the early primary grades should enjoy this book.  The visual clues help children visualize what size the dinosaurs were.  The focus of the book is dinosaurs of North America.
           Denise Engel, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Fisher, Enid.  THEY LIVED WITH THE DINOSAURS.  Illus by Richard Grant.
    World of Dinosaurs Series.  Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 1999.  32 p.
    0-8368-2292-7; lib.bdg., $19.93     98-04542    Gr. 4-6+       560

    On the subject of what living fauna and flora co-existed with the dinosaurs in all the long ages of evolvement, this is an easy comprehensive read.  Busy illustrations depict insects, cretaceous plants, the first mammals, and flying reptiles.  The illustrations are garish but suited to the ancient life they portray.  Phonetic spellings are helpful.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Fisher, Enid.  TRUE-LIFE MONSTERS OF THE PREHISTORIC SEAS.
    Illus by Richard Grant.  World of Dinosaurs Series.  Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 1999.
    32p.  0-8368-2293-5; lib.bdg., $19.93   98-45733    Gr. 4-6+     567

    Fisher begins with scientific indications that dinosaurs could swim and discusses four categories:   placodontts, mosasaurs, plesiosaurs, and pliosaurs and includes 13 creatures of the Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous Seas.  Crudely dramatic but gripping illustrations amplify the simple text about some of the earliest marine reptiles. Written in a combination of storytelling-science factual style, the book has a clear contents page and glossary.  The Fisher books have phonetic spellings  Additional books, videos, and web sites are listed.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

 Fisher, Enid.  TRUE-LIFE MONSTERS OF THE PREHISTORIC SKIES.
    Illus by Richard Grant.  World of Dinosaurs Series.  Milwaukee, Gareth Stevens, 1999.
    32p.   0-8368-2294-3; lib.bdg., $19.93    98-45732.     Gr.  2-5+      567

     Any illustrator of a dinosaur book has complete artistic license in the coloration of the ancient reptiles since there is little proof of what color tones their skins and scales truly were.  Looking at modern reptiles is their best clue to accuracy.  Some of the colors look somewhat macabre in this book, but they are as good as many other attempts to depict the Triassic-Jurassic cretaceous creatures.   This book is devoted to 11 different flying dinosaurs, pterosaursaurs, and explains what they looked like,  how they flew, their food, and  nesting habits.  Readers will appreciate the phonetic spelling for each of the eleven.  Interesting text blends well with the complete page design.  A good contents and glossary, very readable as simple scientific fact.  A bibliography of books, videos, and web sites completes the book.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Giblin, James Cross.  THE MYSTERY OF THE MAMMOTH BONES.
    New York: HarperCollins, 1999.  97p.  0-06-027493-X;hb., $15.95
    0-06-027494-8 lib.bdg., $15.89    98-6701       Gr. 3-7      569.67

    Charles Wilson Peale was an artist, a scientist, and a writer.  Mr. Giblin, author of 18 other nonfiction books, unearthed the facts for this mystery by reading Peale's letters and diaries which gave accounts of collecting the fossil skeletons of two extinct giants of the Pleistocene epoch.  These ancient mammals were actually mastodons, but they were the showcase for this natural history museum, the first in the United States.  Over 30 wonderful black and white photographic illustrations enhance the Peale biographical theme and the accurate overview of the world-shaking developments in paleontology  in the 1800s.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Green, Tamara.  DINOSAUR BABIES.  Illu. by Richard Grant.  World of Dinosaurs Series. 
    Milwaukee, WI: Gareth Stevens, 1999. 32p.  0-836-82290-0; lib.bdg. $19.93  K-Gr. 3    567.9

    Dinosaurs come alive in the cartoon-like illustrations and the text is written in narrative  but accurate style.  Readers of any age might struggle with pronunciation of the many names in dark type, because unlike the Fisher books, there is no phonetic spelling for the many species. This book is devoted to eggs and baby skeletons and what scientists have learned from them about how dinosaurs prepared their nests and later fed and protected their young.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Green, Tamara.  GREAT DINOSAUR HUNTERS.  Illus by Richard Grant.
    World of Dinosaurs Series.  Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 1999.  32p.
    0-8368-2291-9;  lib.bdg., $19.93     98-31768     Gr. 2-6+     560.922

    Many new dinosaur books mention some of the great bone hunters but this one provides pictures and vignettes of at least fifteen, two of them women including England's Mary Anning. No phonetic spellings are given.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Green, Tamara.  WHAT DINOSAURS ATE.  Illus. by Richard Grant.  World of Dinosaurs Series.  
    Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 1999.  32p.  0-8368-2295-1; lib.bdg. $19.93   Gr. 2-4+    567.9

    Fierce expressions on every dinosaur face, except for the one eating gastroliths (stones), will grab the interest of dinosaur fans.  The text is clear, accurate, and well-coordinated with the cartoon style dinosaur reproductions; sometimes gory.   Recommended for upper elementary and middle school students.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Lessem, Don.  RAPTORS!  THE NASTIEST DINOSAURS.  Illus. by David Peters.
    Boston: Little, 1996. 32p.  0-316-5211-1; hb., $14.95    0-316-56428-1 pb. $5.95.
    K-Gr. 3 +   567.97

    This picture book spin-off from JURASSIC PARK is well named.  Lessen, the author of nine other books, was a science adviser to the film and the director, Steven Spielberg, who suggested he write about the carnivorous raptor dinosaurs. Dr. Philip Currie of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology was the scientific adviser.  As early as 1909 Barnum Brown, "Mr. Dinosaur," and Roy Chapman Andrews were shipping huge specimens to the American Museum of Natural History after arduous trips to Alberta, Canada, and the Gobi Desert of Mongolia.  Brown discovered the first T. Rex and Chapman the first nest of velociraptor fossilized eggs.  Two Polish women scientists unearthed the spectacular "Flying Dinosaurs," a Proceratops and Veloaraptor, locked in combat and overcome by a sandstorm in the Gobi.   On-site photos of working paleontologists reduces the glamour but adds authenticity.  Vivid action illustrations are engaging enough for any dinosaur addict.   A time-line and maps of places where dinosaur fossils were found are valuable additions.   Excellent skeletal drawings and complete life histories of four major raptors bring the readers up-to-date on current research.  Information is included from1842, when the ancient dragons were first named "dinosauria," through the last two decades,  has produced facts and new theories about the denigens who perished 65 million years.  If you enjoyed JURASSIC PARK, you'll like this book.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Lindsay, William. AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY:  ON THE TRAIL
    OF INCREDIBLE DINOSAURS.
  New York:  Dorling Kindersley, 1992, 1998.  96p.
    0-7894-3628,  pb. $14.95   98-26396    K-Gr. 5+   567.9

    In true DK style, an art editor has compiled drawings, maps,  historic photographs as well as  photos of skeletons to provide a colorful account of four dinosaurs: Tyrannosaurus, Barosaurus, Corythosaurus, and Triceratops and how they were found, excavated, and pieced together.   The layout is outstanding.   Extras include a list of museums that provided replica casts of fossils, a map where dinosaurs were found, glossary, pronunciation guide, index, and an introduction by Dr. Mark Norell of the American Museum of Natural History.   Having watched a 3 ½ year-old grandson pore over this book, I can recommend it from that age upward.  The book is incredible; a great compilation of scientific knowledge about four major species, how their fossils survived, and who found them.  On-site photographs and museum preservation give a true perspective of the knowledge scientists have acquired in the last hundred years.  THIS IS THE BEST DINOSAUR BOOK YET!
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Manning, Mick and Brita Granstrom.  DINOMANIA.   New York: Holiday, 2002.  48p.
    0-8234-1641-0; hb., $16.95.  2001-024534   Gr. 1-5  745.5

    There are lots of books about dinosaurs, but this book has a different twist.  After a brief introduction about dinosaurs the book is devoted to projects kids can make about those fascinating creatures.  Most of the 18 projects cover a double spread. A list of ingredients appears in a sidebar.  Step by step directions appear for each.  A “sound-bite” in the shape of a dinosaur bite, provides tidbits of information about dinosaurs in each project.  Some of the projects are making a time line, a nesting colony, a Peterosaur mobile, costumes for several dinosaurs, making a video, or performing a play. The “Dinosaur ID” pictures 13 dinosaurs and gives the period in which they lived, whether they were meat or plant eaters, and how big they were.  An index concludes the book.  Different dinosaur patterns appear on both end papers so the dust jacket should be removed so it doesn’t cover up any of the dinosaurs.  This books should prove popular in school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Parker, Steve.  DINOSAURS AND HOW THEY LIVED.   See and Explore Series.
    Illus. by Guiliano Fornari Srgio.  New York: Dorling Kindersley, 1988, 1998. 64p.
    0-7894-3447-4, pb.  $7.95         K-Gr.4+         567.91

    Parker's book is a good  introduction to dinosaurs: who they were, discovering them rebuilding them, life before dinosaurs, first dinosaurs, flying and sea reptiles, horns, stegosaurus ,heads and skulls, mothers and babies, warm blooded dinosaurs, birds, theories for extinction, descendants.  A picture gallery includes 18 dinosaurs with information about each.  Illus are paler than in Lindsay's book.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Sheldon, David.  BARNUM BROWN DINOSAUR HUNTER.  Illus. by author. New York:  
        Walker & Company, 2006.  ISBN: 10: 0-8027-9602-8 hb. $16.95      Gr. 1-4    j560.92

        David Sheldon has created a beautiful picture book.  His detailed illustrations bring to life the amazing career of Barnum Brown.  During the early 1900's Barnum Brown became known as the dinosaur hunter.  He had an ability to find unknown dinosaur bones.  This story is presented in a easy to understand manner.  The facts are there, along with a bit of fantasy.  I think this book would appeal to most children.  It is well written and supported by large illustrations, a bonus for reading aloud.  I can imagine many follow-up activities and questions to enrich the reading experience and spark imaginations.
            Heidi Bretall, Library board, Bessemer Public Library

Taylor, Barbara.  DINOSAUR DINNERS.  New York: Dorling Kindersley,  1998.  32p.
    Eyewitness Readers Series,  Level 2.  0-7894-4252-3; hb., $12.95  0-7894-2959-4, pb.,
    $3.95     97-36750     Gr. 1-3      567.9

    Thank goodness for the phonetic inclusions for pronouncing the names of the dozen dinosaurs in this easy reader because most have five syllables.  DK has used the same vividly colored dinosaur paintings in several bigger versions of its dinosaur books.  Sidebars provide additional information.   This is an excellent beginning science book.
    Virginia Foreman, retired teacher,  lifelong reader of books about paleontology

Thimmesh, Catherine.  LUCY LONG AGO: UNCOVERING THE MYSTERY OF WHERE
      WE CAME FROM.
   Illus. by Oacar Sanisidro.  New York: Houghton Mifflin Books,
      2009.  64p.  ISBN: 978-0-547-05199-4 hb. $18.00.    Gr. 3-6      j569.93

     This book is a valuable offering; it belongs on public and school library shelves. It is a vivid reminder that new discoveries can and do often change our understanding of the past. Lucy's 47 bones, dated 3.2 million years ago, gave scientists a new understanding of the evolution of hominids. The story of the bones discovery and the explanation of how bones fossilize are fascinating, punctuated with clear illustrations and photographs.  There's a great deal of meat on this bone.
      Barb Ward, Children's Librarian, Retired, Dickinson County Library

Wheeler, Lisa.  MAMMOTHS ON THE MOVE.  Illus. by Kurt Cyrus.  Harcourt, Inc.,
           
2006.  32p.  ISBN-10: 015204700X hb. $16.00   Gr. 2-4    j569.67

            As the wooly mammoths begin their winter trek to the south to find food, they face challenging terrain, ferocious predators and erratic weather.   Readers will be fascinated with the journey of prehistoric mammoths making their way through rugged surroundings, unfamiliar to the way the earth looks today.  While Wheeler's rhyming text conveys the story to a young audience, Kurt Cyrus does his best to transport readers back in time and feel what it would be like to travel with mammoths.  The stark beauty of the illustrations and sparse text, together on the page, make an impressive experience for young readers.
            Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner.  DINOSAURS BIG AND SMALL. Illus by Lucia Washburn. 
    Let’s-Read-And-Find-Out About Science series.  New York:  Harper, 2002.  40p. 
    0-06-027935-4; 15.95  0-06-027936-2; lib.bdg., $15.89   0-06-445182-8; pb., $4.95         
    00-059695      K-Gr. 3      567.9

    This handsome and informative book begins with dinosaurs on the end papers, title pages, and bibliographic pages.  There are lots of books about dinosaurs but this one has a special feature.  Zoehfeld takes sizes of dinosaurs and compares them with objects that readers know about so they have objects of reference.  For example, a Diplodocus is “longer than 22 kids laid out, head to foot” and weighs “as much as 320 kids together.”  A Brachlosaurus weighed 160,000 pounds, an adult elephant weighs 10,000 pounds so “one Brachjlosaurus would weigh as much as 16 elephants.”  The illustrations shows 16 elephants in a pyramid formation.  Several dinosaur eggs are shown next to a chicken egg.  The last two pages show eleven dinosaurs with names, phonetic spelling, size in feet, and weight in tons.  This title is typical of books in the series.  Information in words easy enough for younger readers and illustrations that help explain the text.  The comparisons take the place of the usual experiments that accompany this series. Yes, there is room for another dinosaur book, especially for younger students.  However, this book provides useful information to older students as well.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner. TERRIBLE TYRANNOSAURS.  Illus  by Lucia Washburn.  
    New York: HarperCollins, 2001.  0-06-027934-6; hb., $15.95       Gr. 1-4    567.12

    Dinosaur lovers, get ready for a new addition to your collection!  Despite the fact that Tyrannosourus Rex was one of the fiercest creatures of the prehistoric world, he will still win the hearts of those who can't resist yet another dinosaur book.  Done in a format with charming paintings that will make the reader feel the title is fiction, the book proves otherwise.  The text is loaded with informative facts and current information about these dreadful beasts.  For instance, did you know that the most terrifying thing about a Tyrannosaurus Rex is its teeth?  T. Rex had as many as fifty to sixty teeth that grew in jaws that could open wide enough to swallow a grown person in one gulp.   However, the last T. Rex died more than 65 million years ago, so....sleep well tonight!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library

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574 BIOLOGY

Keyser, Amber.  THE BASICS OF CELL LIFE WITH MAX AXIOM SUPER SCIENTIST.
      Illus by Cynthia Martin and Barbara Schulz.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2010. 32 p.      
     
978-1-4296-3414-4; lib., $19.99.      Gr 3-9     j571.6 Ke
 
      "Super Scientist MaxAxiom heads to an ocean marina to investigate cells."  And so, begins this graphic novel investigating the building blocks of life, cells.  The scientists begin their cell study of an explanation of plankton on an ocean voyage.  Their journey covers the makeup of cells from DNA, mitochondrion, endoplamic reticulum, and all the way to amino acids.  Scientist Max also discusses alien invaders, plankton blooms, and stem cells in medicine on their journey.  Once returned to shore he moves into the area of specialized human cells like skin cells and neurons in the brain, and a walk in the takes him into the world of plant cells.  As in all Capstone Press books, the last few pages cover facts about cells, a glossary, index, and places to get more information about cells.  The new twist in this series of science books is a short biography about MaxAxiom.  The book stands alone as an unique introduction or review of cells or an example of how to turn a science topic into a graphic novel.
      Chris Collins, L'Anse School/Public Library, L’Anse, MI

Perkins, Wendy.  LET'S LOOK AT ANIMAL BOTTOMS.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press,
          2007.  24 p.  ISBN: 9780736867153 hb. $19.93    Gr. PreS-2    JUV   j571.3

          This book looks at a variety of animal bottoms and their uses.  It describes how animals can use their bottoms to sit, protect themselves or send messages.  Different types of bottoms are shown in full-color photographs.  The text is simple and would be easy for a beginning reader.  Some help may be needed for descriptive words. The book also includes a glossary, Read More section, an Internet Site, and Index.
          Denise Engel, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Silverstein, Alvin, Virginia Silverstein, and Laura S. Nunn.   CELLS.  Brookfield, CT.
    Twenty-First Century, 2002. 64p.  0-7613-2254-X lib.bdg. $26.90   Gr. 4-8     j571.6

    How exciting can a book about cells be?  Exciting?  No!  But interesting and appealing? Yes!  The Silverstein team has written a detailed presentation of the structure and function of different types of cells and how research is developing technologies.  Keeping up with the times, they have chapters on cloning and the use of stem cells.  The format of this attractive book is clean, easy-to-read, and well organized.  It includes precise diagrams and highlighted sidebars that will arouse the reader's curiosity.  With sections like "Did You Know?"  In addition to a helpful glossary, the Silversteins offer further reading along with Internet sites that are sure to be helpful when doing research or writing a report.  When it comes to science books, this title will undoubtedly "cell" itself.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library

Silverstein, Alvin and Virginia.  DNA. Illus by Laura Silverstein Nunn. Brookfield, CT: 
    Twenty-First Century/Millbrook, 2002.  64 p. 0761322574; hb., $16.95     Gr 5+     572.8

    This title is a hybrid in a series of science concepts.  Beginning with the code of life ("Why does a dog have puppies and not kittens? Why does an acorn grow into an oak tree instead of a sunflower?") and ending with Internet resources, this intriguing creation by the ever-popular husband/wife team, will draw students in with its attractive format and eye-catching color photographs and drawings.  The Silversteins do a good job in keeping the text readable and yet there is a good balance between information and interesting facts (side bars in pastel blue, titled, "Did You Know?)  Although it is not an easy subject to delve into and understand, the authors do a great job of presenting a subject that very little was known about until the 1960's.  This well-organized book will be a valuable addition to reference collections. DNA= Dynamic, Noteworthy, Appealing!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

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574.5 ECOLOGY - BIOMES

Behar, Susie.  GRASSLANDS.  Closer Look At series.  London:  Aladdin, 1998.  Brookfield, CT:  
    Copper Beech, 2000.  32p.  0-7613-1153-x; lib. bdg., $21.90.    99-045543   Gr. 4-6    577.4

    After defining and showing a map locating the world's grasslands, the author talks about the grass itself and grass as food.   There are two broad categories of grasslands--temperate and tropical.  There is a double-page spread for various grasslands around the world--North American prairies, South American Pampas, Eurasian Steppes, African Savannah; and Australian grasslands.  There is a section of animal survival in the savannah indigenous people of all areas, farmers and ranchers, and problems including the dust bowl of the 1930s.
    This attractive book uses drawings and photos to accompany interesting snippets of information for enriching the classroom study of the grassland biome, making it better than many "series books."  Interesting facts, a glossary, and index conclude the book.  Grasslands cover almost a quarter of the world's land area and this book covers the topic well for recommended grade level.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Gray, Susan H.  GRASSLANDS.  Illus with photos.  First Reports series.  Minneapolis:
    Compass Point, 2001.  48p.  0-7565-0020-6; lib.bdg., $15.95  00-008530   Gr. 2-4    j577.4

    A map shows temperate grasslands around the Tropic of Cancer.  The Savannas lie between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn.  Other names for grasslands and their locations are given: Savannas, steppes, Pampas, prairies, and plains.  Information about types of grasses, sod, where soil comes from, fires, animals, problems facing farms and ranches, overuse and the Dust Bowl of the 1930s are included.  Other features include a section called "Did You Know?" "At a Glance," "Want to Know More?" as well as a glossary, a bibliography of four books two web sites, and two addresses (National Grasslands Visitor Center and Grasslands National Park).  Some animals include buffalo, bison, pronghorns, praire dogs, rattlesnakes, weasels, burrowing owls in the shortgrass prairies and gazelles and cheetahs on the African plains.  Purchase where materials are needed to support the study of biomes as well as to support conservation materials.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Love, Ann and Jane Drake.  THE KIDS BOOK OF THE FAR NORTH.  Illus by Jocelyne Bouchard.  
    Niagra Falls, NY: Kids Can, 2000.  1-55074056308; lib.bdg., $15.95.    Gr. 3-8      574.5261

    Maps, prehistory, landscape (ice and permafrost), plants, animals, birds, and people are the substance of this book.   Ancient and modern peoples are: Saami (Laplanders), Evenki, Nganasan, Paleo-Eskimos, Nenets, Inuit, and Inupiat.   Sidebars abound with the “Eco Watch” being the most frequent.  Printed on a pale blue background, the watch discusses information about ecological concerns.  Other sidebars are charts and tables.   Some sidebars are bounded with black line, one of which is a particularly gruesome version of  “Sedna, the Sea Spirit.”  If the polar regions are part of the curriculum, then this book is a good choice for school or public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center

Morrison, Gordon.  POND.  Illus. by Gordon Morrison.  New York:  Houghton Mifflin Co., 2002. 
    30p.  ISBN 0-618-10271-X hb.  $16.00   Gr. K-3.    577.636   

    This is a beautifully illustrated story of the animal and plant life in and around a pond during the course of one year.  The illustrations are very detailed watercolors accompanied by black and white sketches, with even more information about birds, plants, animals and insects.  This book will appeal to the very young as a story of a pond and pond life.  It will appeal to the older child as a source of information and to a teacher as the basis for a science project.  The information is presented in a clear, accurate and appealing manner.  Highly recommended.
    Kay T. Elzinga, Superiorland Library Board Member

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574.52644 TUNDRA

Miller, Debbie S.  RIVER OF LIFE.  Illus by Jon Van Zyle.  New York: Clarion, 2000.
    32p.  0-395-96790-2; hb., $15.00  99-38350  Gr. K-3      577.6

    Realistic oil paintings show the ecology of a river in Alaska during seasons from winter to winter.  Some of the wildlife shown are yellow warblers, salmon, harlequin ducks, caddis flies, kingfishers, trout, moose, brown bears, otters, eagles, gulls, foxes, worms, ants, beetles, bugs, voles, bees and butterflies, dragonflies, mosquitoes, juncos, red squirrels, shrews, ravens, and grizzly bears.  A glossary of 20 plants and animals concludes the book.  Some flora include spruce trees, cottonwood trees, willow bushes, plankton, birch trees, mosses, mushrooms, wildflowers, seeds, and grasses.   The book is informative and beautiful.  Miller and Van Zyle show what is part of the river ecology rather than make comments about saving it.  However, those who see the majestic area, will hope that the chain of life is preserved.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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574.52652 DESERT

Geisert, Bonnie and Arthur.  DESERT TOWN .  Illus by Arthur Geisert.  Boston:  Lorraine/
    Houghton Mifflin, 2001.  32p.  0-395-95387-1; hb., $16.00   00-033605  Gr. K-3   307.76

    Fans of other books by the Geiserts,  MOUNTAIN (HM, 2000), RIVER (HM, 1999), and PRAIRIE (HM,1998), will welcome this title also.  This town, in an American desert, was once a rail station for shipping cattle.  Detailed drawings show people involved in a variety of activities at night because it is so hot during the daytime.  There is much to look at, especially in the combination grocery store/gas station.  Because of extreme weather changes, the town is shown during a sandstorm, snowstorm and even during rain.  The last page tells about some of the changes that happened during the year, like the new overalls on the line.  This makes readers curious to look back and check out those details.  This is an excellent example of people adapting to their environment.  This book is an essential purchase in schools where deserts are studied.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Oldershaw, Cally.  DESERTS AND WASTELANDS.   Closer Look at series.  London:
    Aladdin, 1999.   Brookfield, CT:  Copper Beech, 2000.  32p.  0-7613-1152-1; lib. bdg.,
    $21.90.  99-045544    Gr. 4-6      577.54

    A definition of a desert (hot and cold) precedes information on desert people, animals, and plants.  These sections mix information from deserts throughout the world, not just in one area.  Although a map shows desert distributions, the book is not arranged as neatly by geographical areas as Behar's GRASSLANDS (Copper Beech, 2000), from the same series.   The information is given in double-page spreads that include a combination of maps, photos, and drawings.  The section on desert remains talks about mummies, dinosaurs, and the Dead Sea Scrolls.  Other topics covered are old world deserts, frozen deserts, spreading deserts, desert resources and their uses.  There is a double page spread for deserts of the Americas and for Australia, while a section on Old World Deserts includes northern and southern Africa from the Middle East to China including the Sahara.  Interesting facts, a glossary, and index conclude the book. This is a competent series book for curriculum enrichment of the desert biome to be used with similar materials.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Serafini, Frank,  LOOKING CLOSELY: ACROSS THE DESSERT. Tonawanda, NY:
     
Kids Can Press Ltd., 2008.  ISBN: 9781554532117, hb. $16.95.  Gr. K-3  j578.754

      Serafini uses beautiful photography from the desert region to create this hide & seek book for the younger readers.  Even adults will enjoy trying to guess what the picture belongs to. A creative way to learn about the desert for both young and old.  Large text will invite the older beginning readers to read along.  This book is recommended for K - 3rd grade but could be enjoyable for the younger & older readers as well.
      Charlotte Dugas, Library Director, Munising School & Public Library, Munising, MI

Wilkins, Sally.  DESERTS.  The Bridgestone Science Library.  Mankato, MN:  Bridgestone/
    Capstone, 2001.  24p.  0-73368-0835-3; lib.bdg., $12.95    Gr. 1-5    578.754

    There is a full-page clear color photo and one map on the left side of each page until the end of the book which devotes three pages to an experiment, glossary and bibliography, two addresses, three Internet sites and an index.  A page of text is devoted to each of the following topics: heat, animals, plants, ecosystem, resources, and expansion.  That information is about deserts in general.  There is one page devoted just to the Sahara Desert.  The information is limited.  In the section about animals, only a camel is show in the picture and one paragraph is devoted to them and another paragraph is devoted to toads and frogs.  No other desert animals are mentioned and readers will have to rely on other books.  A map shows where deserts are found and seven facts about deserts are given.  Use this book in conjunction with other desert books for student reports.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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574.529 ENDANGERED SPECIES

Arnosky, Jim.  ARNOSKY'S ARK.  Washington, DC:  National Geographic, 1999.
     32p.  0-7922-7112-2; $15.95.  98-54601   Gr.  2-6+     574.529  or  597.98

    Arnosky, famous for his nature notebooks, makes this book an ark and places a dozen creatures on it.  He tells how these animals were endangered a hundred years ago and how they were saved. The author/illustrator also tells why each animal is special to him.  He chose the beaver because he spends more time watching beavers than any other animal.  Included are: beaver, bison, alligator, crocodile, cougar, bear, deer, brook trout, osprey, manatee, whale, and gorilla.  The illustrations are lifelike and the colors are vivid. Difference between restoring or replacing habitats is addressed.  This is a creative way to introduce endangered animals to children.  This is an excellent addition to school and public library science collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 McGinty, Alice.  DARWIN: WITH GLIMPSES INTO HIS PRIVATE JOURNAL & LETTERS.
     Illus. by Mary Azarian.  Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009.  ISBN: 9780618995318
     hb. $18.00.   Gr. 3-6     j 576.8

     This slim, journal-like, lushly illustrated  book packs a lot of information in a simple, clearly written volume that is also a feast for the eyes. The reader empathizes with the young Darwin for having a big nose and for caring about "nothing by shooting, dogs, and rat-catching" according to his exasperated but loving father. Later, we feel Darwin's awe at the natural world when he sets sail for the Galapagos
aboard the H.M.S.Beagle. As Darwin's collection of finches reveals a world that is constantly changing and adopting, we see Darwin's own surprise and fear, knowing that his discovery of natural selection (and his subsequent publication of Origin of Species) will upset mankind's notion of how the world was created. We are left, however,seeing Darwin as a deeply spiritual, humble man who loved the natural world and who saw no conflict in his belief in God and an ever-changing world. Highly recommended for all libraries. Adults will enjoy this little gem, as well.
      Mary Olmsted, Librarian, Tahquamenon Area School Public Library, Newberry, MI
 

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581 BOTANY:  PLANTS AND TREES

Appelbaum, Diana.  GIANTS IN THE LAND .  Illus. by Michael McCurdy.  Boston, MA: Houghton
    Mifflin, 1993. 32p.   0-39572289-6 hb. $16.00  0-618-03305-X  pb.  $6.95     Gr. 2-7+      634.9

     First published in 1993, the dramatic black and white scratchboard illustrations in this book are as majestic as the trees and the text.  The giant pine trees in New England were 25 stories high in 1760 and were used as masts for warships for King George's Royal Navy.  Appelbaum tells how they were logged, carried away by oxen, and dragged to the rivers to be sent to ships that would carry them to England.  This process ended when the American Revolution began.  Use this book with colonial or nature studies in intermediate and middle schools.  Public libraries need it also if they don't have it already.   It is a gem that deserves to be revived.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Bodach, Vijaya Khisty.  STEMS.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2007.  24 p.
            ISBN: 9780736863476 hb. $19.93   Gr. PreS-2    j575.4

            This book introduces beginning readers to the stems of various plants and their function.  The descriptions of the various stems are accompanied by large, clear color photographs which aids reading comprehension.  The text is simple and uses repeated words and phrases to reinforce the subject matter.  This book has 122 words.  STEMS also includes a table of contents, glossary and index.  Also included is a Read More section and FactHound.com Internet sites.  This book is part of the series, Plant Parts.  This book would be useful for teaching children about the biology of stems. Beginning readers should be able to read the text with some assistance from an adult.
            Denise Engel, Director, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Gibbons, Gail.  TELL ME, TREE:  ALL ABOUT TREES FOR KIDS .  Boston, MA: Little,
    2002.  32p.  0-316-30903-6; hb., $15.95     00-064967   PreS-Gr. 3   582.16

    Gibbons begins with a labeled illustration of a tree and then shows different kinds of trees, a variety of seeds, bark, rings showing age, roots, leaves, fruit, as well as explains photosynthesis, conifers, and broadleaf trees.  Large illustrations of trees, bark, and leaves help readers to identify 13 trees.  Several projects like pressing leaves and bark rubbing are shown and described.  The last page provides miscellaneous information.  The watercolor illustrations help young readers to understand more about trees.  Primary students, teachers, and librarians will enjoy using to this book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Godwin, Sam.  A SEED IN NEED:  A FIRST LOOK AT THE PLANT CYCLE. Illus. by Simone Abel.   
           
Minneapolis, MN:  Picture Window Books, 2005. 32p.  ISBN 1-4048-0920-1 hb.  $16.95    
           
PreS – Gr.2    j581.4

            It is very easy to follow this story about how a seed becomes a plant.  Godwin uses colorful pictures and narrative to encourage the reader to think along. The book is a useful tool for educators to teach young learners how to use a factual book.  It includes a nice glossary and index, including a couple of facts beyond the scope of the target audience. Should pre-schoolers be encouraged to eat plants out of the yard?
            Sue McNeill, K.I. Sawyer Learning Center and Library

Miller, Debbie S.  ARE TREES ALIVE?  Illus by Stacey Schuett.  New York: Walker, 2002. 
    32p.  0-8027-8801-7 hb. $16.95    0-8027-8802-5 lib.bdg. $17.85     PreS-Gr. 4     582.16

    Each double-page spread shows thirteen people from around the world with a tree native to that area accompanied with appropriate scenery and wildlife.  Each tree is focused at the end of the book with a small picture, Latin name, and facts about the tree.   The acrylic and gouache illustrations are in somber shades but effective nonetheless and include appropriate ethnic faces.  The illustrations add significantly to the information provided by the text.  The animals around the double page spread at the end of the book are identified by name but not by tree.  However, all of them appeared earlier in the book and this is a way to satisfy the curiosity of readers who wish to identify them.
    The introduction asks readers to “treat trees with respect, use them wisely, and recycle” and tells them that if they plant a tree and send her a photo, she will include it on her web site. www.debbiemiller.com  The website for Arbor Day is also included.  This is a different approach to learning about trees in a picture book format and will be a welcome addition to school and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Parker, Steve.  MOLDS,  MUSHROOMS & OTHER FUNGI.  Mankato, MN:  Compass Point Books, 
            2009.  48p.  ISBN 987-0-7565-4223-8 lib.bdg. $21.99     Gr. 3-8      j579.5

Any questions you may have about fungus will be answered in this informative book.  Large photographs are scattered over every page, boxed off with text, to read like a magazine.  Topic headings begin with the parts of a fungus and proceed to edible fungi, deadly fungi, and fungi in the lab.  Besides the table of contents and introduction, there’s a table of biological classification, glossary, and index.  This beautiful book is so interesting, readers will learn new fungi facts without any effort.
            Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI 

Richards, Jean.  A FRUIT IS A SUITCASE FOR SEEDS.  Illus by Anca Hariton.
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002 32p.  0-7613-1622-1; lib.bdg., $21.90  Gr. 1-4     581.4

    Richards compares fruits to a suitcase that is full of seeds.  She explains how seeds travel; large seeds, pits; multi-seeds; seeds on the insides and outside; and vegetables that are really fruits.  Fruits are compared to a suitcase that is full of seeds.  Hariton's soft watercolors add to the value of the book.  Additional information appears in a double page spread with seven questions and answers about fruit. The lack of an index does not detract from this book which is more like an informational picture book than a nonfiction book needing an index.   The total effect is pleasing and informative.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ryden, Hope.  WILDFLOWERS AROUND THE YEAR.  Photos by author.  New York:
    Clarion, 2001.  90p. 0-395-85814-3; hb., $17.00      Gr. 5-12     582.13

    This title contains large detailed photos for 38 wildflowers with a page of description beginning with common and Latin name and ending with months of bloom time.  Ryden ends with a list of books for further reading.   Fine full-page photos of wild flowers are the best feature.  The organization of plants by their natural sequence of blossoms from spring to fall is helpful.  The author includes interesting histories of names and historical uses of the plants.  Comments that pointed out the fragile existence of many plants in view of the “progress” which man tends to apply to natural areas are also useful.   The author points out that invasive plants crowd out natural wetland flora and that habitat is being destroyed by logging, agriculture, and housing.  Commercial development could have been added.  Ryden warns that there is harm in picking wild flowers and attempting to transplant them is often unsuccessful.  Ryden also mentions that some would apply the label of “noxious weed” to describe a common wildflower such as the dandelion and common skullcap.  Although these plants may invade the carefully tended lawn, the author encourages readers to look at them as interesting plants.
    The anthropomorphic statements such as “plants choose” and “plants attract” are troubling.  These statements give plants “intent.”  The most outrageous of these was “Why did columbine specialize in attracting hummingbirds” on page 26.  Ryden also uses words such as “shy” to describe plants.  The implication that plants “develop strategies for survival and reproduction” also verges on an anthropomorphic view.
    Ryden might have included the family names for the flowers and pointed out a few distinctive family characteristics.  For instance, all minta (Labiatae) have opposite leaves and square stems, features which are present whether or not there are flowers.  Some information about overall plant height or some other sense of scale is important.  Large flowers and small ones are all the same size in the photos.  Size and overall shape of a plant as well as preferred habitat are essential keys to identification.  Any inaccuracies are “implied” mistakes.  For instance the purple lustrate (Lythrum salicaria) is a member of the Loosestrife Family.  It crowds out the native loostrife (swamp candles or yellow loosestrife, Lysimachia nummularia) which is in the Primrose Family.  Similarly, skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus) is not in the cabbage family as the name suggests.  It is related to the jack-in-the pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum) and is in the Araceae Family.  Since both of these plants are featured, the family characteristics could have been mentioned.  The vocabulary is quite sophisticated for young readers but the beginning pages outline some basic botanical terminology.  The suggestion that readers note the sequence of appearance of flowers in their own areas is a good one.
    The purpose of the book seems to be to encourage the reader to look for wildflowers in many places and to appreciate where they are.  Except for the bothersome slides into anthropomorphism, this book encourages the reviewer’s motto, “The fun is in the finding”  and will be helpful to that end.
    Kathy Peters, 40 years of experience as a science educator
    Degrees in Biology, Zoology, with numerous field botany classes
 

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590 ZOOLOGY

Arnold, Caroline.  SOUTH AMERICAN ANIMALS .  Illus. with photos.  New York:
    Morrow, 1999.    48p.  0-688-15565-0; lib.bdg., $15.93   0-688-15564-2; hb., $16.00   
    98-7669   Gr. 2-7     591.98

    Large color photos and text provide information about 17 animals in South America that are arranged by habitat: forests, mountains, grasslands, and water.  Many of the photos cover two pages and are suitable for group viewing.  The text is boxed with a lighter background so it is not lost within the photos.  School and public librarians will share this versatile book with students researching South America, animals, and habitats; especially the rain forest.  This book is particularly useful in schools where Spanish is taught.
    Papoure says, “I am a Spanish teacher and discuss South America with my students every year. This book is a good introduction to South American animals and their habitats.  The photographs are beautiful.  I also learned a great deal from the descriptions of the animals.  The breakdown of animals by geographic regions is a useful way to divide the book.”  Arnold’s last admonition is “By learning how South American animals live at home in the wild, we can find out ways to help them and give them a better chance to survive in the future.”
    Vicki Leathers-Papoure, Spanish teacher, Negaunee Middle School/High School, Negaunee, MI

Arnosky, Jim.  ARNOSKY'S ARK.  Washington, DC:  National Geographic, 1999.  32p.
     0-7922-7112-2; $15.95.  98-54601    Gr.  2-6+     590   or  574.529   or 597.98

    Arnosky, famous for his nature notebooks, makes this book an ark and places a dozen creatures on it.  He tells how these animals were endangered a hundred years ago and how they were saved.  The author/illustrator also tells why each animal is special to him.  He chose the beaver because he spends more time watching beavers than any other animal.  Included are: beaver, bison, alligator, crocodile, cougar, bear, deer, brook trout, osprey, manatee, whale, and gorilla.  The illustrations are lifelike and the colors are vivid. Difference between restoring or replacing habitats is addressed.  This is a creative way to introduce endangered animals to children.  This is an excellent addition to school and public library science collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Aston, Dianna.  AN EGG IS QUIET.  Illus. by Sylvia Long.  San Francisco:
            Chronicle Books, 2006.  26p.  0-8118-4428-5 hb. $16.95   Gr. K-5   j591.468

            This is a wonderfully detailed, exquisitely illustrated book, whose script writing gives a poetic feel to the words describing the many kinds and types of eggs.  It is very informative, being about insect, bird, reptile, and even fossilized dinosaur eggs.  The illustrations are very detailed ink and watercolor naturalistic drawings.  The ongoing short notes provide even more information.  Eggs come in different sizes, colors, shapes, and textures, but ultimately a new life emerges, and that is the gift of the egg.  This book is an absolute delight.  I highly recommend it.
            Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Library Board

Auch, Alkison.  TAME AND WILD.  Spyglass series.  Minneapolis: Compass Point,
    2002.  24p.  0-7565-0226-8; lib.bdg., $18.60   2001-007380  Gr. 1-2  636

    Auch says “Most people belong to some kind of a family” and then tells readers that animals belong to families too.  The book is devoted to photos of pets that have wild relatives: cats/lions, guinea pigs/voles, cattle/yaks, horses/zebras, hogs/boars, rabbits/hares, and dogs/wolves.  Readers are involved when Auch asks readers to think of wild animals not in this book and supplies several projects about them.  It would be interesting to see which readers realize that the pairs of animals rhyme.The glossary explains five terms, like camouflage, that were in bold print in the text.  There is a list of three age appropriate books and a web site as well as an index.  This is an excellent choice for primary readers to practice their reading skills and learn about animals at the same time.  Teachers will appreciate having a book their students can read for themselves when studying animals and opposites.   Because of the subject matter, students may choose the book to read for themselves, especially cat lovers who notice the cat on the cover.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Bailey, Jacqui. THE STICK AND STONE AGE. Illus by Matthew Lily.  Cartoon History of the Earth series.  
    Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can, 2001. 32p. 1-55337-074-0 hb., $11.87    Gr. 4-6    591.3

    Cool design!  Comic book art!  Lightheartead!  Brief text!  To the point!  That just about sums up this Cartoon History of the Earth title that deals with how life began on this planet.  Children will want to begin with volume one, however, and carry on through to modern man to get the full picture.  Bailey cleverly includes a green hand on those pages where he wants to direct the reader to be aware of added notes and a bit of humor.  He also uses bold caps in speech bubbles to draw attention to additional pertinent information.  Lilly's illustrations are appealing in that they are not crowded and form themselves around the text.  Contemporary thoughts and contemporary art combine to offer a favorable avenue of approach to a much discussed subject.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library

Barre, Michel.  ANIMAL RELATIONSHIPS.    Illus. with photos.  Milwaukee:  Gareth
    Stevens, 1998.  48p. 0-8368-2077-0 lib.bdg.  $21.27.   PreS-Gr. 4   .591.56

     A wealth of information in forty-eight pages.  Barre' examines how animals relate to one another, be it the ability of different species to eat side by side or a male deer who will dominate a herd of females. He reveals the social behavior of communication of anything from a parasite to predators to animals that move in groups. He also touches on animal survival. The clarity of the photographs with their concise captions, provide a nice balance with the uncluttered text. A glossary is provided as is a bibliography for books to read, videos and web sites. It is a great find for an early el student learning to write an informational report of for an interested child who loves to browse the animal books. This book provides a wealth of information.
    Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

Barre, Michel.  ANIMALS AND THE QUEST FOR FOOD.  Illus. with photos. Trans. By Janet Neis.  
    Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 1998. 48p.   0-8368-2079-7 lib.bdg.  $21.27.    Gr.3-8.    591.5

     Starting with the smallest unit of life, the cell, and explaining that animals cannot make the organic matter that their cells need to survive, Barre discusses the involvement and reasoning of why animals must eat other forms of life---be it plants, insects, or other animals. He does this in a format that can be easily grasped by readers in third grade and up. This lively volume is graced with sharp interesting photographs and provides a glossary, a list of other books to read as well as related videos and web sites.  It is far more interesting than standard encyclopedia articles and it would be a useful source for report
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Berger, Melvin and Gilda.  BRRR!  A BOOK ABOUT POLAR ANIMALS .
    Hello Reader, Science, Level 3.  New York:  Scholastic Cartwheel, 2001. 40p.
    0-439-20165-9; pb., $3.99  00-020823   Gr. 1-4    591.7

     A memo to families is that this series helps readers "learn to read by remembering frequently used words like "the," "is," and "and;" by using phonics skills to decode new words, and by interpreting picture and text clues."  There are four or more suggestions for readers before, during, and after reading the book.   The animals in the photos are in bold print in the text to help readers identify them.  The book is totally illustrated with color photos that appear in appealing patterns on the pages.  There is enough information about the Arctic and Antarctic and the animals that live there to make this book useful to classes who are studying the poles and this book can be used for readers above the recommended grades.   There is no question about the value of this book.  The only question librarians will ask is whether it should be shelved with easy readers or science books.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Bright, Michael.  AWESOME OCEANS: AMAZING ANIMAL JOURNEYS.  Brookfield, CT:
    Copper Beech Books, 2002.  32 p. ISBN:  0-7613-2814-9 hb.  $23.90.  Gr. K-3.     591.5
    
    This is a fact-filled book about the migrations of various ocean animals.  It is filled with maps, photographs and illustrations of a variety of ocean-dwelling fish, mammals, reptiles and birds.  There is both a glossary and an index.  This nonfiction book will appeal to the "curious" child and will be useful in studies about oceans, animal habitats, and migrations.  It is definitely recommended for library collections.
    Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Library Board

BUILDING A HOME.  Animal Marvels Series  Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 2001.
    32p.  0-8368-2814-3; lib.bdg., $22.60  00-051626  Gr. 4-6   591.56

    This title tells about a common need of animals --the need for shelter.  Readers learn about dwellings from simple and temporary resting places to unusual and elaborate structures.  Each title in this series is filled with true-to-life illustrations and fascinating facts.  As a reference, each includes a map of the world indicating where each species can be found, tables and files to help children learn and understand, a glossary, and an index. Books in this series should be very appealing to upper elementary age children.
    Carolyn Anderson; Retired elementary teacher; member,  L'Anse Public Library Board

Carle, Eric.  DOES A KANGAROO HAVE A MOTHER, TOO?  New York:
    HarperFestival, 2000.  24p.  0-694-01456-7; bd.bk., $7.95  PreS-Gr. 2    BB    591.3

    The title question is posed a dozen times in this outstanding board book.  The only difference is in the name of the animal.  The animals are kangaroo, lion, giraffe, penguin, swan, fox, dolphin, sheep, bear, elephant, monkey, and deer.  The answer is also the same: “Yes!  A kangaroo has a mother.  Just like me and you.”   Again, only the name of the animal changes.  To keep the momentum going, the question is posed in smaller letters at the bottom of the answer page.  Across from the text, Carle provides his trademark collages of each animal.  Only the last page is different.  The answer to the question of whether animal mothers love their babies is Yes!  Yes!  Of course they do.  Animal mothers love their babies, just as yours loves you.”  This is a perfect answer to a very satisfying book.  On the last page Carle provides the name of the animal babies, parents, and groups for the twelve animals.  Many picture books do not translate well to board book format because they have too much text.  This story is not too long, not too short, has lots of repetition, and is just right.  Home, school, daycare, and public libraries need this essential board book in addition to the picture book (Harper, 2000).
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Downer, John.  WEIRD NATURE: AN ASTONISHING EXPLORATION OF
    NATURE’S STRANGEST BEHAVIOR.  Discovery Channel series.  Illus with photos.
    Buffalo: Firefly, 2002.  156p.  1-55297-586-X; pb., $19.95  Gr. 5-20+  591.5

    In the introduction, Dower tells about creatures who long ago were considered myths but now are explained, like mermaids and unicorns.  Dower talks about unusual creatures, many of whom live in the ocean. The unusual habits of creatures are interesting.  Ocean creatures provide beauty  shops for other fish and trim off loose skin, snip away fungal growths, and remove fish lice.  Mites are stoaways in hummingbirds’ nostrils, lemurs hop like a pogo stick, male scorpions dance before mating after which the female sometimes eats him.  There are other examples of courtship included in a chapter called “Bizarre Breeding.”  “Most animals have only perfunctory orgasms…simply die when they pass breeding age and so do not experience menopause.”  The photos are extraordinary and many magnify small creatures.  Large print sentences catch the readers’ attention, but for the most part the text has no subheadings to break information into smaller sections, forcing readers to rely on the index and contents which breaks the books into chapters that highlight motion, breeding, feeding, defenses, partners, and potions. The book is a companion to a six part Discovery Channel series and would be useful to teachers who use that TV series in the classroom.  Although it is listed for fifth grade and up, the format which does not use subheadings might keep it from being useful at that level and junior and senior high school students are more likely to make use of the book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
 
FINDING FOOD.  Animal Marvels Series  Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 2001.
    32p.  0-8368-2815-1; hb., $22.60       00-051628   Gr. 4-6     591.5

    This title illustrates the similarity of all animals in respect to their need for food whether they are herbivores, carnivores or omnivores.  Information about what animals eat and the ways they have adapted to finding and catching their meals will fascinate readers. Each title in this series is filled with true-to-life illustrations and fascinating facts.  As a reference, each includes a map of the world indicating where each species can be found, tables and files to help children learn and understand, a glossary, and an index. Books in this series should be very appealing to upper elementary age children.
    Carolyn Anderson; Retired elementary teacher; member,  L'Anse Public Library Board

Fredericks, Anthony.  A IS FOR ANACONDA: A RAINFOREST ALPHABET. Illus. by Laura Regan. 
    Chelsea, MI: Sleeping Bear Press, 2009.  ISBN 978-1-58536-317-9 hb.  $17.95    Gr. 1-4    j591.734

    The format in this series is a simple rhyme on one side of the two page spread, and in-depth facts on the othe side, making it appropriate for a wide range of ages.  Exotic wildlife paintings are a perfect compliment to the text.  This is worthwhile purchase for schools and libraries as an awakening to the plight of the rainforests and their inhabitants, both plant and animal.
    
Barb Ward, Retired Children’s Librarian, Cickinson County Library

GETTING AROUND.  Animal Marvels Series  Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 2001.
    32p.  0-8368-2816-x; hb., $22.60   00-051627  Gr. 4-6   591.47

    This title highlights the myriad ways that animals move.  From stay-at-home types to those that migrate considerable distances, animals display enormous ingenuity in the art of getting around.  Each title in this series is filled with true-to-life illustrations and fascinating facts.  As a reference, each includes a map of the world indicating where each species can be found, tables and files to help children learn and understand, a glossary and an index. Books in this series should be very appealing to upper elementary age children.
    Carolyn Anderson; Retired elementary teacher; member,  L'Anse Public Library Board

Gibbons, Gail.  GRIZZLY BEARS.  Illus. by author.  New York:  Holiday House, 2003. 
    32p.  0-8234-1793-X  hb; $11.87   Gr. 3-6   J 599.784

    Gail Gibbons adds another bear book to her repertoire of informational picture books for elementary school readers.  Similar to GIANT PANDAS and POLAR BEARS, this book has just enough text to balance the large, colorful pictures on each page.  Additional information has been tucked into the illustrations, giving extra depth to the book.  Teachers and parents can read GRIZZLY BEARS aloud or include it in a unit study on bears.  It would be a worthy addition to any library or classroom.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Goodman,Susan G. CLAWS, COATS, AND CAMOUFLAGE.   Photos by Michael Doodlelittle. 
     Brookfield, CT: Millbrook, 2001.  48p.  0-7613-1865-8; hb., $22.90    Gr. 3-7     591.4

    The photographs are awesome.  The format is appealing.  The text is sometimes confusing. There is a brief intro describing adaptation which is discussed very broadly in terms of animals fitting into their environment, staying safe, obtaining food and reproducing.  Following this are exquisite photos and informative text of various animals followed by a question asking, "What's this animal's adaptation?"  Flip the page to find the answer. Most adaptations included are physical, but some are behavioral.   Obviously done more for browsing than using information for reports, this book will undoubtedly appeal to a reader who is willing to adapt to adaptation.
    Pat Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Heinz, Brian J.  BUTTERNUT HOLLOW POND.  Illus by Bob Marstall.  Brookfield,
    CT:  Millbrook, 2000.  32p.  0-7613-0268-9; lib.bdg., $22.90  Gr. 2-6    591.763

    From daybreak to midnight, readers learn about life in a typical pond.  Flora and fauna introduced are:  water striders, whirligig beetles, bluegills, duckweed, mosquitoes, gnats, mayflies, tree swallows, mallard ducks, snapping turtles, algae, pumpkinseed, herons, wildflowers, bees, woodchuck, cottontail, cottontail, blackberry thickets, marsh hawk, white-tail deer, frogs, moths, water snakes, pickerel frogs, largemouth bass, toads, crickets, katydids, brown bats, crayfish, raccoons, opossums blacksnakes, voles, moles, foxes, screech owls, and kingfishers.  The illustrations are realistic and portray life at Butternut Hollow Pond.  This is an easy way to learn about pond ecology.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center

Hickman, Pamela.  ANIMALS EATING: HOW ANIMALS CHOMP, CHEW, SLURP,
    AND SWALLOW.  Toronto & Tonawanda, NY:  Kids Can, 2001.  40p. 1-55074-577-8;
    hb., $10.95  1-55074-579-4; pb., $5.95   C00-931431-8   Gr. 3-7  591.3

    The subject matter is fascinating and the illustrations add to the adventure of how animals eat.  The crocodile’s jaws are scary and the tongues of toads, woodpeckers and anteaters are suitably icky.   There are lots of sidebars like one labeled “Who eats what” that accompanies swamp plants and animals in a section on the food chain.  There is a project outlined for each section including a sidebar lists the ingredients necessary to accomplish the task.  One such activity is to make a fabric sack with directions on manipulating it to explain how a gizzard works.  Sidebars for each animal begin “If you were a longtail weasel” accompanied by a bulleted list of 6 interesting facts.  There is lots of information that is not in the sidebars.  Information, about two picky eaters,  is accompanied by pictures of a giant Panda and a Koala.  Some of the spectacular pictures are of a turkey vulture, giraffe, blue whale, and python.  Tongues, jaws, teeth, baleen, cuds, extra stomachs, predators, carnivores, suffocation, and carrions are some of the terms that are explained through the text of this book which can be used in the curriculum but is interesting enough to be picked up and read for pleasure.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Jenkins,Steve.  DOWN, DOWN, DOWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA. Boston:
        Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009.  ISBN: 978-0-618-96636-3 hb.  $17.00    Gr. 3-6    j591.779

        Hot summer days will make this fresh looking book leap off the shelf into the hands of readers wanting to experience the mysteries of the oceans. Each double-paged spread will take you into deeper, darker regions. You start out in the familiar, light-infused waters of the friendly dolphin. As you plunge deeper into the Twilight Zone and Abyssal Plain(13,000 ft.down!) you meet monstrous looking creatures right out of a science fiction movie, like the girdle of venus comb jelly. The bright, clear-cut illustrations done in collage beg you to read the text as your eyes devour the amazing creatures that inhabit the ocean depths. Sure to be an award winner.
        Mary Olmsted, Librarian, Tahquamenon Area School Public Library, Newberry, MI

Jeunesse, Gallimard.  WHAT DO ANIMALS EAT?  First Discovery, New York:  
    Scholastic Cartwheel, 2001. 14p.  0-439-35591-5; bd.bk., $4.95     PreS      BB

    Seven animals are included in this book and children can reach them by index tabs at the right side of the book.  Adults can use the tabs to teach animal recognition to children by asking them to find the squirrel, wolf, kingfisher, rabbit, domestic cat, mouse, and chimpanzee.  Two or three sentences are included for each animal.  The series was originally published in France.  The illustrations are lifelike and expressive.  The words herbivore, carnivore, and omnivore are very ambitious vocabulary words for board books but the concepts are handled well.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Juenesse, Gallimard and Sylvia Peyrols.  ANIMAL HOMES.  Illus by Sylvia Peyrols.
    First Discovery, Look-It-Up Board Books series.  New York: Scholastic Cartwheel,
    2001.  14p.  0-439-29724-9; bd.bk., $4.95    PreS     BB

    The series was originally published in France.  The illustrations are lifelike and expressive.  Seven animal homes are included in this book and children can reach them by index tabs at the right side of the book.  Adults can use the tabs to teach animal recognition.  Ask children to find the rabbit, bird, ant, squirrel, polar bear, beaver, and turtle using those tabs. The reward will be a double-page spread showing the homes of the animals.  Besides identifying the name of the home; i.e., tunnels and holes called burrows, nests, lodges, etc.  Other information is included, sometimes it relates to the home and sometime it does not--information on the rabbit pages is given for what they eat and how many babies they have.  Usually, in a book this short, information is limited and parallel.  Although the extra information is not parallel, this is still a board book worth owning by public libraries and board books.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Juenesse, Gallimard and Ute Fuhr. BABY ANIMALS IN THE WILD. Illus by Raoul Sautai.
    First Discovery, Look-It-Up Board Books series.  New York: Scholastic Cartwheel, 2001.
    14p.  0-439-29722-2; bd.bk., $4.95   PreS      BB

    Seven wild baby animals are included in this book and children can reach them by index tabs at the right side of the book.  Adults can use the tabs to teach animal recognition.  Ask children to find the zebra, crocodile, bear, eagle, dolphin, lion, and goose using those tabs.  The reward will be a double-page spread showing babies and their mothers.  Fathers are included for eagles and lions.  Information on all babies gives their name; i.e., foal, hatchling, cub, etc.  Two or three sentences are included for each animal.  The series was originally published in France.  The illustrations are lifelike and expressive.  This is the best book in this series.  Purchase for preschool and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Kajikawa, Kimiko.  SWEET DREAMS:  HOW ANIMALS SLEEP.  New York:
    Holt, 1999.  unp.    0-8050-5890-7;  hb., $15.95.  98-16637    PreS-Gr.3      591.5

    Photos show how a dozen animals and human's sleep.  One sentence on each page is part of a rhyming couplet that is not only accurate but descriptive.  The name of the animal is the subject of each sentence and is in larger type on the line above the rest of the sentence.  Primary teachers can use the book as a pattern for children to write sentences about photos or pictures that have been collected.  Because the photos show only animals (except for two photos showing an infant and a child), this book can be used similarly in adult literacy programs.  At the end of the book there is a photo of each creature and information about them.  Included are: orangutans; lions; sharks; black bears; koalas; sea otters; sloths; bats; hippos; flamingos; chipmunks; and horses. This book is an excellent addition to easy nonfiction animal collections for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Kaner, Etta.  ANIMAL TALK: HOW ANIMALS COMMUNICATE THROUGH SIGHT,
    SOUND, AND SMELL
.  Illus by Greg Douglas.  Tonawanda, NY:  Kids Can, 2002.  40p.
    1-55074-982-X hb., $10.95.    1-55074-984-6 pb., $5.95.    Gr. 1-7+     591.59

    Sidebars provide basic information about the animals besides how they communicate with each other.  The information includes where and how they live.  The sidebars begin “If you were a …”  The book involves readers through three experiments and providing a chart that tells about ears, eyes, and mouths and what kind of message their position tells watchers.  Then four faces of animals are given and readers can decide what message the faces are telling observers.  Various types of communication that are shared by Kaner are sound, smell, body language, signals, and lighting up.  The book ends with how a dolphin, chimp, and a gorilla communicate with humans.  The index is helpful and includes about fifty animals as well as other topics.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Kaner, Etta.  ANIMALS MIGRATING: HOW WHEN WHERE AND WHY ANIMALS MIGRATE.  
            Illus.by Pat Stephens. Towanda, NY: Kids Can Press, 2005.  40p.  ISBN: 1-55337-747-5 hb. $12.95.    
            Gr. 2-6   j591.568

            Animals from around the world and in the ocean relocate with the seasons, whether near or far. Strange facts about some of the animals may surprise the reader. The book shares experiments to help understand migration concepts, and is an excellent resource on animal migration.
            Jolene Hetherington, Teacher, Munising Middle School, Munising, MI

Levinson, Nancy Smiler.  NORTH POLE SOUTH POLE.  Illus by Diane Dawson Hearn.  New York: 
    Holiday, 2002.  40p.    0-8234-1737-9; hb., $14.95     Gr. 1-2      ER     or     508.31

    A globe and then maps of the top and bottom of the earth show the North and South Poles.  Within the text readers learn about the axis, role of the sun, animals, people, and visits by scientists and explorers.  This is a suitable nonfiction easy reader that will be useful in studies about the Poles, winter, animal habitats, and continents.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

LIVING TOGETHER
. Animal Marvels Series  Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 2001.  32p.
    0-8368-2817-8; lib.bdg., $22.60   00-051625   Gr. 4-6    591.7

    This title helps readers understand the social life of animals.  Some are primarily loners while others like company.  Preferences change for a variety of reasons and over a range of time.   Each title in this series is filled with true-to-life illustrations and fascinating facts.  As a reference, each includes a map of the world indicating where each species can be found, tables and files to help children learn and understand, a glossary, and an index. Books in this series should be very appealing to upper elementary age children.
    Carolyn Anderson; Retired elementary teacher; member,  L'Anse Public Library Board

Lourie, Peter.  WHALING SEASON: A YEAR IN THE LIFE OF AN ARCTIC WHALE SCIENTIST.  
        Illus.by Peter Lourie, John Craighead George, and Bill Koski. New York: Houghton Mifflin Books for 
        Children, 2009.  32p.   ISBN 978-0-618-77709-9  hb. $18.00    Gr. 3 – 8   j599.5

        First rate photography compliments this fascinating look at a way of life most of us will only see in books or documentaries.  Whale hunting and harvesting has been part of the Inuit culture for hundreds of years.  The collaboration of scientists studying whales and Inuit hunting practices have produced important facts about migration, gestation cycles, feeding and more.  Children will be fascinated with the photographs researchers studying whale eyeballs to see how the lens works, along with the world and lives of the distant Inuit.  This is a valuable book for libraries and classrooms.
       
Barb Ward, Retired Children’s Librarian, Dickinson County Library

Lynch, Wayne.  ARCTIC ALPHABET: EXPLORING THE NORTH FROM A TO Z.
    Photos by author.  Buffalo, NY:  Firefly, 1999.  32p.  1-55209-336-0; lib.bdg., $19.95
    1-55209-334-4; pb., $6.95   Gr. 2-6   577.09

    A wildlife photographer, science writer, documentary writer, and lecturer has created an exciting alphabet book that shares animals of the arctic.  There is no alphabet book that has more spectacular photos.  Spectacular photos are either in rectangles with text above or below them or fill the entire page with text superimposed on the picture without detracting from the picture.  Dr. Lynch’s text is very informative and would be a big help to students researching animals or the arctic.  Entries begin with Aurora Borealis, Beluga Whale, and Caribou to Xanthoria, Yellowcoat, and Zooplankton.   This is an excellent choice for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Mattern, Joanne and Gail Saunders-Smith. THE KOMODO DRAGONS.   Mankato, MN:
      Capstone Press, 2010.  24p.  ISBN: 9781429633215 (lib) $15.99    Gr. K-3     j590

      Did you know the Komodo Dragon is the largest lizard in the world, and it can grow up to 10 feet long?  There are only 5,000 Komodos alive in the world today.  This informational picture book with enough facts to satisfy the curiosity of the most precocious second grader.  There are photos to show every aspect of the Komodo's life, even a cruesome dinner picture.  As in all Capstone Press books, it has a glossary, index, and suggested sites for more information. 
      Christine Collins, Library Director, L'Anse Area School/Public Library

Miller, Debbie S.  RIVER OF LIFE.  Illus by Jon Van Zyle.  New York: Clarion, 2000.
    32p.  0-395-96790-2; hb., $15.00  99-38350  Gr. K-3      577.6

    Realistic oil paintings show the ecology of a river in Alaska during seasons from winter to winter.  Some of the wildlife shown are yellow warblers, salmon, harlequin ducks, caddis flies, kingfishers, trout, moose, brown bears, otters, eagles, gulls, foxes, worms, ants, beetles, bugs, voles, bees and butterflies, dragonflies, mosquitoes, juncos, red squirrels, shrews, ravens, and grizzly bears.  A glossary of 20 plants and animals concludes the book.  Some flora include spruce trees, cottonwood trees, willow bushes, plankton, birch trees, mosses, mushrooms, wildflowers, seeds, and grasses.   The book is informative and beautiful.  Miller and Van Zyle show what is part of the river ecology rather than make comments about saving it.  However, those who see the majestic area, will hope that the chain of life is preserved.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center

Myers, Jack.  ON THE TRAIL OF THE KOMODO DRAGON AND OTHER
    EXPLORATIONS OF  SCIENCE IN ACTION. Illus by John Rice.  Honesdale, PA:
    Boyds Mills, 1999.  1-56397-761-3,    hb $17.95.    98-73073.    Gr. 4-8   591

     The senior science editor for Highlights for Children asks 11 questions about sleeping horses, skydiving cats, talking chimpanzees, flicking snake tongues, Komodo dragons, hummingbird fuel, fast  pronghorn antelope and cheetahs, giraffe necks, and leatherback turtles .   Each section is about 4 or 5 pages long  with 2 or three watercolor illustrations to add to the interesting text.  Even if readers are not interested in science they will be intrigued about how their cat is like a skydiver, what we can learn about dinosaurs from leatherback dinosaurs, or how a hummingbird gets its energy.   The book has obvious curriculum connections but it's major appeal is that it will reach readers for pleasure reading.  This is the type of book that librarians enjoy sharing because it  can be given to eleven readers with eleven different interests and like potato chips, reading just one segment may not be enough.  Jack Myers, Ph.D. is Professor Emeritus of Zoology at the University of Texas at Austin and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.
     Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Patent, Dorothy Hinshaw.  ANIMALS ON THE TRAIL WITH LEWIS AND CLARK.
    Photos by William Munoz.  New York:  Clarion, 2002.  118p.  0-395-91415-9; hb.,
    $18.00   2001-042200  Gr. 4-9+  917.804

    Beginning with a map of the Lewis and Clark’s Expedition from 1804-1806, readers learn why the expedition was organized, where it went, and what the explorers learned about animals.  The photos of animals they found along the way are exceptionally clear and colorful.  Phrases from the diaries occur throughout the book.  Four web sites appear at the end of the book along with books in a section called “To Learn More.”  The most unique part is seven-page  “Chronology of Animal Discoveries New to Science,” a list of 121 new species of animals identified on the expedition and recorded in the journals.   The date, name, and place is given for each animal. An index concludes the book.  There are lots of books about the Lewis and Clark Expedition but none focuses solely on the animals.  This is an outstanding science and history book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Polydoros, Lori.  WOLVES ON THE HUNT.  Mankato,MN: Captone Press, 2010.  31p.
        ISBN: 978-1-4296-3391-8 hb.   Gr. 1-3   j599.773

        Bold, blood-red colors and sharp canines will make this wildly appealing to 1-3 graders doing their first informational reports. Teachers will appreciate the short sentences and clear chapter headings. Wolf lovers--don't be put off by the growling wolf on the cover: the book gives a balanced account of their place in the food chain and the need for preservation.  This book is a must for all school libraries: it will fill that niche for informational text geared to early elementary. There is a nice little index and glossary,too.
        Mary Olmsted, Librarian, Tahquamenon Area School Public Library

Preston-Mafham, Rod.  BEARS.  Zillud with photos.  The Secret World of series. Austin, TX:  
    Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 2002.  48p.  0-7398-4983-2; lib.bdg., $27.12   Gr. 2-7   599.78  

    Besides explaining what bears are, origins, bears and people, and conservation, there is basic information about food, reproduction, and behavior.  The photos are clear and aesthetically placed on the pages.  Although text is superimposed over a picture of a mountain habitat, the photo is muted and the text is easy to read.  This muted photo provides a background for quick facts as well as a border around each two-page spread.   Other sidebars are highlighted by a circle entitled “I Didn’t Know That” to impart such pictures. Drawings, and facts such as Koala bears are not really bears, Pandas are very placid and only move from one food source to another, and the origin of the Teddy Bear.  The basic information is clear and concise.  A glossary of terms, four age appropriate titles, and an index complete the book. This is a example of a series book at its best.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Sayre, April Pulley.  HOORAY FOR AFRICA!  Our Amazing Continents series. Illus with photos.  
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2003. 32p.  0-7613-2121-7; lib.bdg., $21.90     Gr. 1-5   577.8

    The striking contrast between photos and text in different sizes and hues provides information about the second largest continent.  Included are deserts, savannas, wet and dry seasons, wetlands, beaches, coasts, marshes, islands, mountains, lakes, big cities, small villages, and many people.  Most of the books in this series have 900 numbers but this one has a 500 number because the best part includes the various biomes.  Is it possible to create a photographic nonfiction book about a vast continent in 32 pages and do it justice?  Almost!   However, this book does convey the idea of what a continent is and the types of biomes on it and the variety of wildlife that reside there.  The book begins with a map showing Africa’s location on the globe and ends with a map showing the continent between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans.  The three pictures of people from Ethiopia, Namibia, and Tunisia are not enough to represent the many groups who live in the 53 countries.  This would be suitable for primary and intermediate students who are studying Africa and need a book that stresses its role as a continent.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Slater, Teddy.  ANIMAL HIDE-AND-SEEK.  Illus. by Donna Braginetz. Bank Street Ready-to-Read Series.   
    Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 1998.  30 p.  0-8368-1760-5, hb. $8.95.  97-030141.  Gr.1-3. 591.47

     Bringing science to life, this book examines how and why certain birds, insects, and mammals disappear by blending in with their backgrounds.  A model of nonfiction excellence, the author and illustrator work hand in hand to provide a most engaging children's book about animal camouflage.  The eye-catching illustrations will transport you into each of the animal's environments.  Parents and teachers will appreciate the essential elements of this well-formatted learning tool as your children respond to the inviting nature of this 'ready-to-read' series book.  A perfect book for sharing and for encouraging appreciation for natural science.
     Becky  Stoessner, Kindergarten Teacher, Superior Hills Elementary School,  Marquette, MI

Swinburne, Stephen.  BOXING RABBITS, BELLOWING ALLIGATORS:  COURTSHIP
    POEMS FROM THE ANIMAL WORLD.
  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  32p. 
    0-7613-2556-5; lib.bdg., $23.90   2001-006485  Gr. 2-6     591.56

    A dozen animals are introduced to children through a patterned poem that includes the words “How do you meet a mate?”  Photos accompany the prose poems that explain how bowerbirds, lizards, bullfrogs, alligators, rabbits, stickleback fish, frigatebirds, hippos, fireflies, fiddler crabs, and whooping cranes attract their mates.  For example, the peacock preens and shows his magnificent tail to get attention.  A small photo at the end of the book accompanies additional facts about each animal.  The photos, while not distinguished, are adequate.  The subject of the book makes this book ideal for browsing.  There is no index and the animals do not appear in alphabetical order but the table of contents has large enough print to see the names of the animals and the page numbers.  This is an unusual animal book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Swinburne, Stephen.  SAFE, WARM, AND SNUG.   Illus by Jose Aruego and Ariane Dewey.
    San Diego:  Harcourt, 1999.  unp. 0-15-201734-8, hb;  $16.00. Gr.   K-3     591.56

    Although it is difficult to maintain a rhyme scheme for a nonfiction book, Swinburne ably  shares with readers how 11 animal parents protect their young in this beautiful picture book. Aruego and Dewey's menacing predators add a new dimension to this science book, executed in pen and ink, gouache, and watercolor.  There is additional factual information about each animal at the end of this delightful nonfiction picture book which is sure to appear on several outstanding lists and maybe even win a prize or two.
     Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Walsh, Melanie.  DO DONKEYS DANCE?  Illus by author  Boston:  Houghton Mifflin, 2000.
    32p.  0-618-00330-4; hb., $15.00    99-39989   PreS-Gr.2     591.5    or    E

    This colorful picture book is a series of questions beginning with “Do pigs buzz around flowers?”
The answer appears on the next page:  “No, bees buzz around flowers.”  The same pattern occurs for six other questions about animals but the final question  involves a human and has a surprising answer--“yes.”  Other creatures include a turtle, kangaroo, cat, bat, hippo, flea, chicken, fish, ladybug, and flamingo.  This book is reminiscent of Katie Davis’  WHO HOPS?  (Harcourt, 1998) and WHO HOOTS? (Harcourt, 2000) and there is room for all three books in most preschool, elementary, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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595.4 SPIDERS

Markle, Sandra.  SNEAKY, SPINNING, BABY SPIDERS. Illus. by Daniel Heuclin. New York:
          Walker & Company, 2008.  32p.  ISBN: 0-8027-9697-4 hb. $16.99  Gr. K-3    j 595.4

          Markle's award winning style and expertise brings another science offering that will fascinate and educate young readers. 
Stunning photography will elicit “oohs” and “aahs” from children and big people, while bringing them into the world of baby spiders, 
their spider parents and their enemies. Fascinating and informative from start to finish including a Jumping Spider going after a bee 
on a flower to the mother pushing her eg sac into its silk cradle or the Wolf Spider carying her egg sac on her back.  From the 
science geek to the reluctant reader who needs to do a research paper, this offering belongs in the classroom as well as libraries. 
Bravo, Markle.
        Barb Ward, Retired Children's Librarian, Dickinson County Library, Iron Mountain, MI
    

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595.7 INSECTS  

Barner, Bob.  BUGS! Bugs! Bugs!  San Francisco: Chronicle, 1999.  unp.
    0-8118-2238-9; hb., $12.95.   98-39604      PreS-Gr.3      595.7

    Bright paper collages make this rhyme appealing.  If a spider is not an insect, than the Daddy Longlegs should not be in this book.  Two interesting features are double page spreads at the back shows the eight creatures in actual size and another, a "Bug-O-Meter" which has a chart that answers four questions like "Can it fly?" and "Does it sting?"  Students can use this chart to ask and answer other questions about insects including "Is the Daddy Longlegs spider an insect?"  Insects included are a butterfly, ladybug, grasshopper, caterpillar, bee, ant, and roly-poly bug.  This book can be used to teach graphing.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Clyne, Densey.   CATCH ME IF YOU CAN!   Photos by author.  Milwaukee:  Gareth
    Stevens, 1998.  32p.  0-8368-2056-8. lib bkg, $19.93.   97-41450   Gr. 3+     595

 Even those who don't like creepy crawlers will be captivated with the picture- puzzle format of this Nature Close-up. Many of the photographs are almost reminiscent of Walter Wick's "I Spy" series as the insects are hiding or camouflaged on leaves, branches or flowers in the photos--just waiting to be found. The author explains the amazing tactics of survival and then instructs the reader to go on a search to find the hard-to-see subject (it is not always an easy task). The text is written in a clear, easy-to-read style making it a great introduction to insect behavior and animal defenses. An attractive addition to easy nonfiction--both informative and a fun read.
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

Facklam, Margery.  BUGS FOR LUNCH.  Illus. by Sylvia Long.  Watertown, MA:
    Charlesbridge, 1999. 32p.    0-88106-271-5; lib.bdg., $15.95    0-88106-272-3, pb.,
    $6.95  98-4640    PreS-Gr.4       591.5      PAULIN'S PICKS

    Watercolor and pen and ink illustrations make this book more than a science book about bugs.  All pages have a band around them that is invaded by insects which provide an aesthetically pleasing look.  The book begins "If your lunch was a bug,/Who could you be?  Maybe a nuthatch/At work in a tree,"  The wonderful nuthatch has his eye on several insects in a tree.  The bark on the tree looks so real that readers will wantreach out and touch it. The largest creature on each page is the predator and at first the spider makes readers think that it does not belong in this book, but it is the predator, not one of the bugs.   Other predators are: bat; gecko; mouse; shrew; toad;  mantis; trout; bear; aardvark; plants; or people.  At the end of the book there is a section giving more information about each predator along with a picture in a section called "More About Bugs for Lunch."  This is a different point of view from the usual insect book.  Instead of what bugs eat, it is about who eats bugs.  HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Glaser, Linda.  BRILLIANT BEES.  Illus. by Gay W. Holland.  Brookfield, CT:  
    The Milbrook Press, 2003.  ISBN 0-7613-26707 pb.  $8.49  Gr. 1-4   595-7

    Beautifully illustrated and wonderfully informative, this fact-filled book about honeybees is a marvelous introduction to the subject.   A section at the end of the book provides clear information and illustrations, showing the queen, drone, worker, and the four stages of bee development.
    
Linda Peterson, Retired Librarian, Carnegie Library, Ishpeming, MI.

Hall, Margaret.  WASPS.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2006.
    24p.  ISBN: 0-7368-4254-3  hb. $14.95.   Gr. K-2    595.798

    WASPS is an early science book, geared to first-grade students, that defines wasps as flying insects, reveals their appearance in close-up color photographs, and tells what wasps do. Writing is minimal and straightforward; for example, "Most wasps are about the size of a paper clip." As is typical of the Pebble Plus books, it includes a glossary and references for further reading, as well as the Internet site www.facthound.com for additional research on the subject of bugs.
    Judy Bennett, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Healy, Nick.  THE WORLD'S MOST DANGEROUS BUGS.  Series: The World's Top Tens.  
           
Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2006.  32p.  ISBN: 0736854568 hb. $17.95    Gr. 3-4    j595.16

            This book's cover will grab any child's attention with it's greatly enlarged photograph of a bug and title exclaiming "The World's Most Dangerous Bugs".  The enlarged photographs continue inside the book counting down ten of the world's most dangerous bugs.  The book begins with an introductory page explaining why bugs are dangerous.  Each of the ten bugs are featured on two pages with three to four paragraphs of text appropriate for the reading level this book targets.  Some pages also include photos of bugs on humans or show the damage they can inflict on humans.  The text concludes with why bugs are important.  This book also includes a Table of Contents, Glossary, Read More Internet Sites and Index.
            Denise Engel, Director, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Heinrichs, Ann.  LADYBUGS.  Nature's Friends series.  Minneapolis, NM:  Compass Point,
    2002.  32p.  0-7565-0167-9; hb., $21.26     2001-004974    Gr. K-2    595.76

    The book begins with the well-known rhyme about the ladybug flying away home a reminder to readers that ladybugs are favorite insects that are found in all states; seven of which have chosen them as the state insect.  The states are not mentioned so readers can search for state names.  Heinrichs begins with parts of the body, kinds, boys and girls, food, hibernation, enemies, how ladybugs have been helpful, Asian Ladybugs, and Ladybugs in space.  Several features in the book are helpful.  Items in the glossary are in bold type within the text of the book.  A quick "...Look at Ladybugs" gives information about class, order, family, range, life span, life stages, and food.  Another section called "Did You Know?" contains miscellaneous facts.  The "Junior Entomologists" section defines the word and gives readers a science experiment set-up with 10 follow-up questions.  A page called "Want to Know More?" contains three books, two web sites, and three museum addresses and phone numbers.  An index completes this book that contains full-page color photos that add information and interest.   This book is not passive but provides readers with opportunities for action.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Holland, Gay W.  LOOK CLOSER: AN INTRODUCTION TO BUG-WATCHING.
    Illus by author.  Brookfield, CT: Millbrook, 2003.  32p.  0-7613-2664-2; lib.bdg., 
    $22.90   2001-044465     Gr. 2-6     595.7

    This is a fascinating look at bugs through both text and illustration.  The full-page illustrations show a microscopic view superimposed on the natural background.  The fourteen bugs are described with interesting tidbits like how they are camouflaged, how and what they eat, how they help people, when and where to find them, and alternate names.   Some of the descriptions are gruesome and will appeal to some readers:  “…plunging its rostrum into the wasp’s back.  Next it injects a poison that turns the victim’s insides to mush.  Then the ambush bug slowly sucks up its soupy dinner.”
    Some of the insects like aphids, cicadas, dragonflies, fireflies, and fleas are common but others like spittlebugs, torn bugs, water scorpions, and assassin bugs are less known.  At the end of the book there is a chart or “Identification Guide” that contains three sections: a picture, size in inches and centimeters, and a four-line description.  The lists of three identification books and three Internet sites are also helpful.  Purchase for school and public libraries or for gift giving.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Jackson, Donna M.  THE BUG SCIENTISTS.  Illus with photos.  Scientists in the Field series.  
    Boston:  Houghton, 2002.  48p.  0-618-10868-8; hb., $16.00  2001-039256  Gr. 3-7+    595.7

    This exceptional book about bugs is a priority purchase for school and public libraries.  The photos are clear and colorful.  The close-ups of bugs are large enough that parts can be labeled.  The five chapters are devoted to entomologists.  The book begins with a picture of Dr. Tom Turpin from Purdue University showing giant bugs crawling all over his face.  If readers aren’t drawn in by the picture, they will be drawn in by the text which talks about Turpnin’s an annual “Bug Bowl” complete with a bug spitting contest.   In this chapter, readers learn about Turpin’s interest in bugs from childhood and some fascinating information about bugs.  Even the section called “Bug Basics” is  interesting.  The second chapter is about the Monarch Butterfly Watch at the University of Kansas, directed by Dr. Orley R. Taylor.  Elementary students tagged 86 butterflies so they could be tracked.   The third chapter is about Valerie Cervenka, Minnesota’s only forensic entomologist who uses insect investigation to fight crime.  The large pictures of the maggots are not for the faint hearted.  Information about “mysteries with maggots.” is interesting.  The fourth chapter is about Steven Kutchner who directs insects and spiders in movies and music videos.  Bugs are crawling all over him in his photo.  The fifth chapter is about Dr. Ted Schultz who studies ants.  The “bug bits” at the end of the chapter contains information on nine topics like “most beautiful” or “longest living.”  The “Buzz Words” section is a glossary of 25 words.  The “Gone Buggy” section is a bibliography of six books, four web sites, and information about the Young Entomologists Society.  As promised, this book successfully “takes the ‘ug’ out of Bug.”
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Lerner, Carol.  BUTTERFLIES IN THE GARDEN.  Illus by author.  New York: Harper, 2002.  32p.  
    0-688-17478-7; hb., $16.95  0-688-17479-5; lib.bdg., $16.89.    00-061408   K-Gr. 4     595.78

    Although this picture book is classified as a butterfly book, it devotes equal time to the flowers on which they feed.  Besides full color illustrations of the butterflies and plants within the text of the book, there are close-up drawings of the flowers and the head of the butterfly to show where nectar is located and how it is accessed.  The text also explains the process and provides phonetic spellings of words like proboscis to aid readers.  Besides planting flowers, there are other tips for luring butterflies to yards. A section of the book is devoted to the life cycle from laying eggs to emerging butterflies.  There is lots of reliable information packed into this book .  The one disturbing element is that the labeled color illustrations of butterflies that the introduction says should help readers to identify the butterflies is different on the two sets of end papers so that it is not possible to keep the dust jacket or part of the pictures will be covered up and not usable.  This is unfortunate because the introduction even provides page numbers and names of the butterflies so readers can locate them on the end papers.  Losing the dust jacket is a small price for the information in this picture book that will delight butterfly enthusiasts of all ages.  This is a first purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Rockwell, Anne.  BUGS ARE INSECTS.  Illus by Steve Jenkins.  Let's Read-and-Find-
    Out About Science series.  HarperCollins, 2001.  40p.    0-06-028568-0, hb., $15.95
    0-06-028569-9; lib.bdg., $15.89     Pre-S-Gr. 1  595.7

    Young children who are fascinated by crawly critters will love this book.  Part of Let's-Read-and-Find-Out About Science, this title conveys basic information on how to identify insects and how to distinguish them from beetles and arachnids.  A variety of insects and their individual peculiarities are highlighted in the text that is simple enough for a young child to comprehend but is also appealing to early primary children.  Best of all are the illustrations: some double page spreads, some portraying insects crawling or flying onto the page, and each highlighting a specific concept in the accompanying text.  This book is a fun and accurate way to introduce children to the world of insects and could easily be used as the basis for a science unit in the early grades.  A list at the end of the volume identifies the insects and other animals portrayed on each page.  And a guide to related learning activities is included.
    Carolyn Anderson; Retired elementary teacher; Member,  L'Anse Public Library Board

Rustad, Martha.  HONEY BEES.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2003.  24p. ISBN 0-736816666 hb.   Gr. K-2   j595.79
               This is an excellent source of information on the honey bee.  Photos support the text for young readers.  Words to Know,
Index/Word List, Bibliography, Internet Sites at the back of the book make the book a jumping-off point for children to learn more 
about the honey bee.  It includes early reader vocabulary to encourage independent reading.
               Eleanor Brouillard, Cherry Creek Elementary School, Marquette, MI

Schlepp, Tammy.  MINIBEASTS.  My World series; Level 3. Brookfield, CT: Copper Beech, 2000.   
    32p. 0-7613-1223-4 lib.bdg. $17.90;  0-7613-2325-2 pb.,$3.99   Gr. 1-3    j592

    The photos in this book bring hairy spiders, cockroaches, Tarantulas, slugs, maggots, stinkbugs up close and personal.  Much information is imparted through simple informative sentences.  The illustrations are either enlarged photos or realistic drawings.  Two double page spreads at the end provide a review for readers who are asked to match parts of minibeasts to the photos and drawings or are asked to match pictures of four creatures with pictures of four homes.  The information is factual; the illustrations are repulsively appealing to make an interesting read for beginning readers or remedial adults.   This book is a great easy reader for students who are studying insects.  This is one of the best titles in this series and is a first purchase for easy reader collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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597 FISH

Aaseng, Nathan. PIRANHAS. New York: Kidhaven Press, 2006. 48p. ISBN 0-7377-3133 hb.  Grades 2–8   j597.4

               This book is part of the Animals ATTACK! Series.  Readers who like true stories of danger and adventure will like this.
It covers information about whether piranhas are really the deadliest fish, what causes a feeding frenzy, attacks in the wild and in 
captivity and new dangers caused by changing habitats and the release of the fish into non-native areas.  This book is not for those 
readers who are very squeamish.
            Ann Best, Bookmobile Assistant, Menominee County Library
Hall, Margaret.  PARROTFISH.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Pess, 2006.
    24p.  ISBN: 0-7368-4270-5  hb. $14.95.  PreK-2    597.2

    Parrotfish are colorful fish that swim near coral reefs. They eat algae and even hard coral. They're pretty remarkable
creatures! Color photographs illustrate the habitat and habits of these warm-water fish in a book suitable for first-grade readers. 
The total 24 pages include a glossary and "read more" section as well as the Internet address of facthound.com for more age-appropriate 
search sites.  
    Judy Bennett, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI
Rockwell, Anne.  LITTLE SHARK.  Illus. by Megan Halsey.  New York:  Walker & Co., 2005.  32p.  
ISBN 0-8027-8955-2 hb. $15.95   Gr. K-3   j597.3

               Bright illustrations and short simple text tells the story of Little Shark’s birth and growth to adulthood.  There are many 
interesting shark facts for budding scientists, but presented as a story.  This is a very attractive book for children.
               Ann Best, Bookmobile Assistant, Menominee County Library

Slade, Suzanne.  FISH: FINNED AND GILLED ANIMALS.  Illus. by Kristin Kest. Minneapolis, MN: 
      Picture Window Books, 2010.   24p.  ISBN: 978-1-4048-5523-6 hb. $18.99.    Gr. K-3     j618.57

      This book is an informational book about fish for primary students.  Each page is a separate heading with information about the heading, much like chapters in longer books.  It is written in language young children will understand.  The illustrations are large and bright.  A good part of the information is about classifications of fish, which could lend itself to creating classification charts in classrooms.  The book ends with trivia information, a glossary, index, and places to obtain more information on the topic.  This is a book loaded with information for youngsters relevant to our Great Lakes region.
      Chirstine Collins, Library Director, L'Anse Area School/Public Library

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597 AMPHIBIANS - FROGS

Arnosky, Jim.  ALL ABOUT FROGS.  Illus by author.  New York: Scholastic, 2002.
    32p.  0-590-48164-9; hb., $15.95  2001-020680    PreS-Gr. 5     597.8     PAULIN’S PICKS

    Beginning with the lily pads on the end papers, this is a beautifully illustrated and designed science book.  Acrylic paints serve as backdrops for the type which is 16 point and helpful to beginning readers. The illustrations flow seamlessly from page to page and add significantly to a text that is informative and interesting.  One particularly stunning picture is a bullfrog whose eyes virtually pop out of the page.  Readers learn about amphibians, differences between frogs and toads, many types of frogs worldwide, labeled views, food, noises, metamorphosis, and predators who hunt and eat them. There is no glossary but Arnosky does an admiral job of defining terms as he goes along.  This is a an exemplary science picture book that deserves consideration for a variety of prizes.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ferri, Vincenzo. TURTLES & TORTOISES. Buffalo, NY: Firefly Books, 2002.
    255p.  1552096319; pb., $24.95  C2001-9026218      Gr.6-up    597.9

    This is an ideal guidebook for students, naturalists and anyone who is just plain interested in land, marine and freshwater turtles and tortoises.  It describes in a concise and informative manner, the many details of 190 species.  A treasure of photographs and drawings reveal the patterns, coloration, and habitat of each turtle. Tortoises and turtles reach back to the ancient world of dinosaurs and are survivors of reptiles, but today are considered to be among the most threatened species.  Their lack of defenses and slow motion along with habitat destruction make them dangerously vulnerable.  Readers who require facts in a hurry will be pleased with the organized format and easy-to-find information. Who knows, it might even make a herpetologist out of one of its readers someday!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Florian, Douglas.  LIZARDS, FROGS, AND POLLIWOGS: POEMS AND PAINTINGS .
    Illus by author.  San Diego:  Harcourt, 2001.  48p.  0-15-202591-X; hb. $16.00    Gr. K-6   811.54

    Florian's childlike watercolors complement his poems in this picture book.  The 21 poems are about creatures like Newts, Iguanas, Gila Monsters, Chameleons, Cobras, and Diamondback Rattlesnakes.  Some of the poems like "The Skink," "The Gecko," and "The Python," are concrete; all are enjoyable.  Use "The Red-Eyed Tree Frog" to introduce Cowly’s THE RED-EYED TREE FROG (Scholastic, 1999) and "The Poison-Dart Frogs" to introduce Dewey’s POISON DART  FROGS *Boyds Mills, 2001) or Fridell’s THE SEARCH FOR THE POISON-DART FROGS (Watts, 2001.)  Teachers will love these humorous poems to add zest to science units.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
 

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597.9 REPTILES

Frost, Helen.  BOA CONSTRICTORS.  Mankato, MN: Pebble/Capstone, 2002.  24p.
    Rain Forest Animals series.  0-7368-1191-5; lib.bdg., $14.60   PreS-K     597.96

    This book consists of very simple statements about boa constrictors and their basic life functions such as where they live and how and what they eat.  Each double page spread presents a fact and a photograph.  The small size of the book can be easily managed by small hands.  Subject specific vocabulary words are presented with definitions in a separate "Words to Know" section and additional print and Internet resources are listed.  The accuracy of the information is aided by a consulting editor with a Ph.D. and consultants from the Black Hills Reptile Gardens.  High interest combined with a manageable word count of 90, qualify the book for use with older elementary problem readers.  There is a “Note to Parents and Teachers,” “Words to Know,” “Read More,” “Internet  Sites, and ”Index-Word List.”   The book is illustrated primarily with color.  This is part of the Rain Forest Animals series that supports national science standards relating to life sciences.  Other titles in the series are, GORILLAS, JAGUARS, PARROTS, TARANTULAS, and TREE FROGS.
    Carolyn Anderson, L'Anse; retired elementary teacherl and Public Library Advisory Board member

Jacobs, Francine.  LONESOME GEORGE, THE GIANT TORTOISE.  Illus. by Jean Cassels.
    New York:  Walker Publishing Co., 2003.   0-8027-8864-5 hb. $16.95   Gr. 2-4    597.92

    Lonesome George lived the quiet life of a tortoise on Pinto Island until the influence of humans ruined his island environment. He managed to survive and was rescued by wildlife specialists who transported him to a wildlife preserve on another of the Gallapagos Islands. They think George may be the last of his kind and are trying to find him a mate from zoos around the world.  This book would be ideal for beginning a unit on biomes, tortoises, or endangered species.  There's more information about giant tortoises in the back of the book.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Mason, Adrienne.  SNAKES.  Illus. by Nancy  Ogle.  Kids Can Press Wildlife Series. Tonawanda, NY:  
            Kids Can Press Ltd., 2005.  32p.  ISBN: 1553376277 hb. $10.95.    Gr. 3-6   j597.96.

            This book is all about snakes; where they live, how they move and grow, what they eat, and how they interact with people are just some of the topics covered.  The information on snakes was very well researched, yet it was written so young children can both read and understand the text.  It includes a very detailed Index, which is very helpful to young researchers. It also includes a "Words to Know" page providing definitions of some harder words.   The book itself is divided up into very defined sections which makes it easy to read and comprehend. I was very impressed by the pictures.  Illustrator Nancy Gray Ogle did a wonderful job capturing the distinctive look of the different types of snakes.
            Jan St.Germain, Director of Richmond Township Library, Palmer, MI

Wallach, Van.  COBRAS.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2009.  24p.
          ISBN: 978-1-4296-1923-3 hb.   Gr. 2-5   j597.96

          COBRAS is filled with "fun facts" and close-up color photographs of cobras. It describes, in large print, their birth and their eating habits. King cobras eat only other snakes; other cobras eat whatever will fit in their mouths. Fortunately their habitat is only Southern Asia and Africa. Young readers will learn the dangers and fascinating behavior of this creature.  A glossary and internet sites are included in the back of the book.
          Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

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598 BIRDS


Berkes, Marianne.  MARSH MORNING.  Illus by Robert Noreika.  Brookfield, CT:
    Millbrook, 2003.  0-7613-2568-9; lib.bdg., $22.90   0-7613-1936-0; hb., $14.95
     2001-008464     K-Gr. 3   598.1

    The watercolor birds are an integral part of the rhyming text that offers information about 15 birds that live in wetlands.  Berkes uses musical imagery and a glossary of 17 musical terms that include aria, bebop, chorus, melody, and ragtime.  There is a double-page spread called “The Cast” that provides a picture; size in inches, feet, or centimeters; as well as physical and voice descriptions.  The bibliography includes six books of general or marsh specific bird books.  This is a handsome bird book that will be read for information and pleasure as was the author’s MARSH MUSIC  (Millbrook, 2000).
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Black, Sonia W.  PLENTY OF PENGUINS.  Illus by Turi MacCombie.  Hello Reader
    Science series, Level 1.  New York: Scholastic Cartwheel, 1999.  30p.
    0-439-0932-7; pb., $3.99        PreS-Gr. 1     ER    or    598.1

    This easy reader begins with a note to family members for before, during, and after reading.  Told in the first person by a penguin, this rhyming nonfiction book imparts information about where they live, what they eat, predators they avoid, and living in groups.  Eight different types of penguins are shown and labeled on the last page.  Readers are asked “Can you find these penguins in your book?”  This book should have been classed as fiction because the penguin is anthropomorphic.  If purchased, please place in the easy reader rather than the bird section.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Gibbons, Gail.  PENGUINS!  Illus by author.  New York:  Holiday, 1998.  32p.
    0-8234-1388-8, hb.    $16.95.  98-005194.  Gr. 1-6.  598.47

     The exclamation point in the title gives the author's idea that these birds will catch the readers interest, and she is correct.  Throughout the book a wide variety of interesting facts are presented about the penguin, and examples are shown through the illustrations on each page, which also show the variety of penguins.  This book could easily be read to a first grade classroom with great interest, and could also be used in a research paper written by an older student.  The book contains a few maps which would be helpful in locating types of penguins on a classroom map or globe. The author also points out the decline in the number of penguins, and some of the reasons why; a great place for a discussion on why people from all over the world should be concerned about animals that live primarily on the only continent not inhabited by humans.  Children of all ages would both enjoy and learn from this book, a good choice for every library.
     Laura Cherry,  Teacher, AuTrain-Onota Public School, Deerton, MI,

Goldin, Augusta.  DUCKS DON'T GET WET.  Illus. by Helen K. Davie.  
    Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science Series, Stage 1.  New York: HarperCollins, 1965, 
    1989, 1999.  32p.   0-06-027881; hb., $15.95.   0-06-445187-9; pb. $4.95. 
    0-06-027882-X; lib.bdg., $15.89.    97-43597   PreS-Gr.1   598.4

     This book was originally published with illustrations by Leonard Kessler.  Davie's watercolor, pencil, and pastel illustrations bring the ducks to life in this easy to read science book.  Readers learn why ducks are waterproof, why ducks tip their heads under water, and why they tip their tails up in the air.  A variety of ducks are illustrated in the book and the information given about each includes what they eat.  Ducks included are: Pintail, mallards, Blue-winged, Shoveler, Wood, Canvasback, Harlequin, and Merganser.  Information about ducks flying south in the fall is included.   At the end of the book there is an experiment so children can see for themselves why ducks don't get wet.   The last page lists three web sites including Ducks Unlimited for which an 800 phone number and information about membership is given.  Authors and titles of six picture books are listed.  Even if libraries have an older copy of this book, this handsome book is an essential purchase for nature collections in all school and public libraries.  However, this book is an absolute necessity for libraries in the Great Lakes states
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

de Guibert, Francoise.  SING, NIGHTINGALE, SING!  Illus. By Chiaki Miyamoto.
            LaJolla, CA:  Kane/Miller, 2006.  41 p. ISBN: 9781929132980 hb. $13.95    Gr. K-3    j598

            Colorful linoleum block prints illustrate the birds and their habitat in this book.  Three to five word text about the birds' habitat is interspersed with more detailed text
about each of the sixty birds featured in this book.  The way this book is set up, a young reader should be able to enjoy the simple text and colorful illustrations, while an older reader will be able to discover additional details about each bird.  Each of the 60 birds' songs are featured in the accompanying CD.  The publisher suggests that readers absorb the text and then listen to that bird's song on the CD.  One pleasing addition to the CD is a duet of piano and original bird vocalizations.  The composer, Daniel Goyone, was inspired by several birdsongs.  There are 63 tracks on the CD and an index of songs is included in the back of the book.
            Denise Engel, Director, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Hiscock, Bruce.  OOKPIK:  THE TRAVELS OF A SNOWY OWL.  Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills
          Press, 2008.  ISBN: 978-1-59078-461-7 hb. $16.95.   Gr. K-3    j 598.9

          Bruce Hiscock tells the interesting story of an arctic snowy owl.  He takes the reader along the journey of an owl's 
migration from his homeland on Baffin Island to a farm in upstate New York. Children will easily be drawn into the story of 
Ookpik.  The sense of magic in seeing a snowy owl is clearly felt. Landscape of watercolor pictures help to tell this story. 
          Heidi Bretall, Early Childhood Educator,  Bessemer Public Library

Morrison, Gordon.  BALD EAGLE.  Illus. by the author.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998.
    30p.  0-395-87328-2; hb.,   $16.00       97-42007    Gr. K-5    598.43

     The watercolor illustrations in this oversize picture book accurately portray the bald eagle.  The book begins and ends with an eagle's eggs to complete the life cycle of our national bird.  This is really two books in one; both aspects to the book appear simultaneously in each double page spread.  The section with large print can be read aloud and imparts general information about eagles.  More specific information is imparted in smaller print.  Sometimes this information is on a single theme like the types of food an eagle eats or other types of eagles and hawks, at other times it serves as a glossary.  However, in the instance of the altricial and precocial stages of development, more explanation would be appreciated because too much prior knowledge is assumed of the reader.  Because of the two levels of information, this book would serve well for elementary as well as middle school students.  This attractive and informative book about eagles is an important and versatile purchase for children in all states for social studies programs because of the symbolic significance of eagles.  Morrison's book can also be used when studying birds that were on the extinction list and bounced back with special care and protection, in units of bird study, and in areas of the country where eagles are found.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
 

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599 MAMMALS

Ake, Anne. THE GORILLA.   Illus. with photos.  Endangered Animals and Habitats Series.
    SanDiego: Lucent, 1999. 112p. 1-56006-492-7; hb., $15.00.  98-53231   Gr. 4+   599.884

    Of the nearly two hundred animals that are classified as primates, the gorilla is the largest of the bunch. As fascinating as the animal is, equally as fascinating is the information the author has researched.  She discusses the physical characteristics, behavior, habitats and the endangered status of the gorilla. She fortifies her content with black and white photos of the animal itself and people and situations centered around the hairy critter. The book is rounded out with a glossary of terms followed by organizations to contact and a reading list for additional information on the gorilla. Be it for fun or for information go, go, go, go-rilla!
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Bair, Diane and Pamela Wright.  DEER WATCHING: A HOW-TO-GUIDE .  Mankato,
    MN:  Capstone, 2000.  48p.  0-7368-0321-1; lib.bdg., $21.26    Gr. 4-7   599.65

    After an introduction about deer, readers are told how to prepare for deer watching in the first chapter.  In chapter 2, readers learn when to go, what to bring, what to wear, how to behave, how to be safe, and directions on how to build a blind.  Chapter 3 tells where to look for deer feeding areas, public viewing areas, and includes information about seven parks where deer are found.  Chapter 4 is about making observations from tracks, scat, tree markings, camouflage, differences between white-tailed and mule deer, and recording observations.  A field guide to North American deer includes information about white-tailed mule, elk, moose, and caribou.  A glossary, bibliography, addresses, Internet sites, and index complete the book.  Most of this book appears to be written for people who do not live in areas where deer are prevalent and have to go out looking for them.  Readers living in areas also inhabited by deer can best make use of the chapter about making observations and the section about building a blind.  The clear photos add to the value of the book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center

Barghusen, Laura.  THE BEAR.  Illus. with photos.   SanDiego: Lucent, 1999.  96p.
    1-56006-394-7;   hb., $15.00.    98-50214   Gr. 4+      599.78

    The Endangered Animals & Habitats series has an attractive addition that merits attention.  Both fun and informative, the book discuses the bears of the world and threats to their existence. These include hunting, international trade, habitat destruction, captivity and the future of bears.  Barghusen presents the material in an easy-to-follow fashion backed up with lots of photographs, maps and even a couple of cartoons.  In addition there is a glossary, a list of organizations to contact and additional works.  It’s a great book if you want the "bear" facts!
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Barrett, Jalma.  LYNX.   Photos by Larry Allan. Wild Cats of North America Series.  Woodbridge,
    CT  Blackbirch,  1999.  24p.  1567112595, hb. $14.95. 98-009881    Gr. 3-5.   599.75.

     What you wouldn't know if you didn't read books!  Did you know that the lynx is  known as "The Cat in a Bow Tie"?  Or that a lynx's paws are so big that it can run on top of snow without sinking?  Or that the lynx has excellent eyesight and that this animal tends to be silent because of the bones in its voice box?  The sounds it produces are small.  Barrett included many interesting and fascinating facts about this animal.   He describes the natural habitat, including physical traits, social life, survival instincts birth, development, and interaction with humans.  Many  unique and detailed photographs grace the text and together they create a well-balanced informative read.  Other books in the series are FERAL CAT, COUGAR, and BOBCAT .
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

Burnie, David.  MAMMALS.  Illus. with photos. Eyewitness Explorer Series.  New York:
     DK, 1992.   64 p. 0-7894-2983-7, pb. $5.95   92-054312.  Gr. 4+   599

     This multi-chaptered book describes what a mammal is, how it moves, lives, defends itself, behaves, and how it interacts with its habitat.  Each mammal is accompanied by an eye-catching, colorful illustration to further explain the topic discussed on that page.  There are experiments included in the book that will help even the youngest child understand mammals.  This is a wonderful reference book as well as a book to be enjoyed from cover to cover.
     Mary Duranceau,  Teacher, Vandenboom Elementary School, Marquette, MI

Deady, Kathleen W.  GRIZZLY BEARS.  Predators in the Wild series.  Mankato, MN: 
    Capstone, 2002.  32p.   0-7368-1063- 3; lib.bdg., $21.26     Gr. K-3    599.784

    This volume is exceptionally well organized and begins with a double-page spread of “Fast Facts about Grizzlies.”  If the reader delved no deeper into the book his knowledge of grizzlies would be enhanced.  There are four chapters, each of which starts with a box superimposed on the introductory photo in which the facts presented in the chapter are listed in a concise form.  This is an excellent instructional tool and assists the young reader in acquiring good study skills.  Statistics are presented in standard and metric form.  A “Myth vs. Fact” page helps to dispel misinformation.  Also included are “Fast Facts,”  “Words to Know,”  “Useful Addresses,” “Internet Sites,” a bibliography, and an index.   Illustrations are color photographs.
      This outstanding book is part of the "Predators in the Wild" series that includes ANACONDAS, GREAT WHITE SHARKS, HAWKS, KILLER WHALES, KIMODO DRAGONS, VAMPIRE BATS and WOLVES.   Every library should strongly consider adding the entire series to their collections if each volume is as well done as this one.  The ex-director of the American Bear Association consulted on this book.  As I review more and more books I become increasingly impressed with the quality of books published by Capstone Press.
    Carolyn Anderson, L'Anse; retired elementary teacherl and Public Library Advisory Board member

DuTemple, Lesley A. SEALS AND SEA LIONS.  Illus. with photos, charts, and maps. 
    San Diego: Lucent, 1999.  112p. 1-56006-473-0 hb., $15.00.     Gr.4+      599.79

    What is the difference between a seal and a sea lion?  If you don't know the answer to this Question, DuTemple can help you find it in his book.   In this new addition to Endangered Animals Habitats series he describes the physical characteristics as well as the behavior of these two animals. It also explains how they differ from each other, how they relate to humans and the reasons for becoming endangered.  Written for fourth graders and up, if there are words or acronyms not understood, there is a glossary at the back of the book. Also appended are a list of organizations to contact and suggestions for further reading. If it is a worthwhile reference on seals or sea lions that you are looking for, this one ought to "seal" things up!
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Gibbons, Gail.  BATS.  Illus. by the author. New York: Holiday, 1999.  unp.
    0-8234-1457-4; lib.bdg., $16.95    99-12051        K-3+        599.4

        Gibbons presents bats as shy gentle animals, not scary like their reputation leads people to believe.  Information about Dracula and how bats became involved in scary stories is included.   However, at the end of the book, Gibbons tells readers that bats do not have rabies any more than any other animal but cautions readers "Never touch a bat you find on the ground...it could be sick."   All the body parts of the Little Brown Bat and the Noctule Bat are given.  Interesting statistics are included about bats throughout the book.  The large illustrations and three or four lines per page make this book appealing to primary children but also to reluctant readers above third grade.  Even adults in literacy programs will find it fascinating and readable.  Many types of bats such as the giant Flying Fox; Vampire Bats, and the Nectar Bat are included.  School and public librarians should put this book out with displays of Halloween books.   Recommended.
        Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Gibbons, Gail.  GIANT PANDAS.  Illus by author.  0-8234-1761-1; hb., $16.95
    2002-019057    K-Gr. 3     599.789

    A map shows where the Giant Panda once lived and now lives.  In China the panda means “big bear cat” because it has claws like a cat and looks like a bear.  Characteristics of pandas that are covered include poor eyesight, shyness, bamboo consumption, big teeth, baby care, swimming, sleeping and eating habits.  The last sentence in the regular text is that “Giant pandas are one of the rarest and most appealing animals in the world.”  The last page includes 11 paragraphs with accompanying drawings that provide more information about pandas.  The topic is popular and this will be a popular book with readers in school and public libraries.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Gibbons, Gail.  PIGS.  Illus. by the author.  New York: Holiday, 1999.  unp.
    0-8234-144-8; lib.bdg.,  $16.95.  98-28807    636.4

    This book dispels some myths about pigs such as they are smelly and dirty and "eat like pigs."   However, the diagram showing which  parts of the pig are suitable for eating,  reinforces the idea that ham and bacon are large portions of the pig.  The bacon and ham sections in the diagram are disproportionately larger than they should be.  There is a double page spread of eight common breeds of pigs, history of pigs, and lots of interesting information.   Many of the illustrations of the pigs throughout the book are stylistic rather than realistic.  The text is better than the illustrations which is not typical of books by Gibbons.  Perhaps this particular book would have been better served with photographs.
    GUEST REVIEWER: Richard Strieter, 25 years of experience as a hog farmer.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Gibbons, Gail.  POLAR BEARS.  Illus by author.  New York:  Holiday, 2001.  32p.
    0-8234-1593-7; hb., $16.95.  00-054075    Gr. K-4     599.786

    Besides learning about polar bears, readers learn about the Arctic and the animals who live there.  There is a mp showing the Arctic and besides full page drawings, there are close-ups; labels for parts of the bear, the bottom of the paw, and underfur.  Readers learn about the bear's amazing sense of smell, communication, keeping warm, size, food, dens, cubs, and dangers.  The last page shows some additional facts about polar bears. This life cycle book is great for emerging readers of all ages.  The illustrations are up to Gibbons' quality standards and can be enjoyed even without the text.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Goodall, Jane.  THE CHIMPANZEES I LOVE:  SAVING THEIR WORLD AND OURS.
    Preiss/Scholastic, 2001. 80p. 0-439-21310-X; hb., $ 17.95  00-047080  Gr. 3-9+  599.885

    This photographic essay is told in the first person by a scientist who studied chimps in Gombe National Park in Tanzania since 1960 and whose work is continued there today.  Goodall borrows from her own diaries to share observations about chimps.  A large, clear photo of the chimps appears on every page.  This is an excellent way to learn about chimp behavior and how they can be taught as well as well as the career of a female pioneer scientist.  A chart showing chimpanzee classification and the primate family, a map of Africa showing where they live, information about the Jane Goodall Institute, Roots & Shoots environmental and humanitarian program founded by Goodall, and books and videos by and about Goodall.  The web address for Goodall all is also included.   All of the proceeds from the book support Roots & Shoots.  Goodall, who was interested in animals since she was a child, is an inspiration to budding animal scientists.  Useful for animal studies as well as browsing.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist

Huges, Monica.  Mitch Cronick, Ed. ORANGUTAN BABY.  New York:  Bearport, 2006.  
            24 p.  ISBN: 1597161535 hb. $18.00    PreS-Gr. 2      j599.88

            This book is divided into nine chapters which use a Question and Answer format.  The chapter, "What is an Orangutan?"  asks questions any child would ask when they want to find out  more about a subject.  This book answers those questions with short sentences varying in length from two to four per chapter.  The color photographs in this book are charming. The cover of the book has you hooked with a photograph of a baby orangutan's face.  The photos relate well to the text.  This book includes a Table of Contents, Glossary, Index and Learn More section, noting two additional books about orangutans and two internet sites for further exploration.   One thing I liked about the glossary is that next to the word and it's description there also is a photograph to further enhance the understanding of that word.
            Denise Engel, Director, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Markle, Sandra.  HOW MANY BABY PANDAS?  New York:  Walker Publishing Co., 2009.
          23p.  ISBN: 0-8027-9783-0 hb. $15.99.   Gr. K-3   j 599.789

         Markle describes the life stages of a giant panda through information text and amazing pictues which are sure to grab a child's attention. This book will appeal to the natural curiousity of children about nature. A bonus was the counting practice of the pandas in their natural settings. My preschool daughter loved it!
          Paula Branam, Substitute teacher, Tahquamenon Area School Library

Naden, Corinne and Rose Blue.  DIAN FOSSEY: AT HOME WITH THE GIANT GORILLAS.  
    Brookfield, CT: Gateway Green/Millbrook, 2002. 48p.  0-7613-2569-7 lib.bdg. $23.90   Gr. 3-6    599

    The biography begins with Fossey’s early life, her first trip to Africa in 1963 where she met Louis and Mary Leakey who told her about Jane Goodall who was studying chimpanzees in Tanzania.  Dian’s sponsorship by the National Geographic Society in 1966 and how she learned data collection techniques from Goodall are included.  Several double-page spreads with information and pictures are called “Who Are These Gentle Giants?” and “What Have We Learned?”  There are numerous references to Fossey as a loner in this book so it may appeal to readers who also fit that category.   Fossey was murdered in 1985.  Chronology, list of resources including associations, books, web sites, works consulted, and index add to the value of the book.   Librarians can give this book to students who enjoyed reading about Goodall, who are studying mountain gorillas, who are reading about scientists, or who are looking for a biography about a woman.  This is a good choice for biography or science collections
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Nathan, Emma.  WHAT DO YOU CALL A GROUP OF HIPPOS? Woodbridge, CT:  
    Blackbirch, 2000.   24p.  1-56711-356-7 hb. $16.95    Gr. 3-6    599

    Besides being a book about collective nouns, readers learn more about the mammals in a  section called "What Do You Know?"  The vocabulary in this section is not easy to understand and words like dominant male, group breeding, abandoned, offspring, grazing, alpha male, and complex system of communication are not included in the glossary at the end of the book.  A few of the ten words that appear in the glossary are species, cud, endangered, and prey.  This might seem like a handicap but instead allows for two levels of readership.  Because of the placement of this information it is possible to just read the questions and answers pertaining to the names of the common nouns.
    Animals included in this book are baboons, hippos, foxes, lions, seals, cats, rhinos, cows, wolves, and elephants.  At the end of the book there is a chart for packs, herds, and pods and two or three mammals that use these collective nouns.  Four books, no older than 1997, are listed in the bibliography.  Web site addresses are given for harbor seals and the International Rhino Foundation.  Other titles in this series, published in 2000 are:  WHAT DO YOU CALL A GROUP OF ALLIGATORS? AND OTHER REPTILE AND AMPHIBIAN GROUPS; WHAT DO YOU CALL A GROUP OF HIPPOS? AND OTHER MAMMAL GROUPS; WHAT DO YOU CALL A GROUP OF TURKEYS? AND OTHER BIRD GROUPS; WHAT DO YOU CALL A GROUP OF BUTTERFLIES? AND OTHER INSECT GROUPS; and WHAT DO YOU CALL A TERMITE HOME? AND OTHER ANIMAL HOMES.
    There are ten questions and ten answers about collective nouns in each of these books. Divide the group into questioners and answers.  The two groups can ask or answer the questions in unison.  The leader can hold up the book to show the animals while the question is being asked.  This does not ruin the surprise of the answer because the previous answer is across fromthe next animal in question.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Otto, Carolyn B.  WOLVES.  Scholastic Science Readers series, Level 2.  Illus with  photos.
    New York:  Scholastic Reference, 2000.  48p.  0-439-29584-X; pb.,$3.99   Gr. 2-3     599

    The colorful photos and the easy sentences provide tons of information about wolves to beginning readers.  The words in bold print are found in the glossary at the end of the book right before the index.  Difficult words have phonetic spelling in parenthesis after the word; the accented syllable is in bold print like regurgitated.  Domesticate appears on both lists.  The book begins with a gray wolf on the Alaskan tundra.   After reading aloud Jean George’s JULIE OF THE WOLVES (Harper,  ) to second or third graders, children can read more about wolves for themselves.  Use the book when studying biomes (tundra), mammals, endangered species, and ecology.  Shelve with animal books or easy readers.  This is a first purchase for school or public libraries but is essential in Alaska, I Idaho, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Preston-Mafham, Rod.  BEARS.  Illus with photos.  The Secret World of series. Austin, TX: 
    Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 2002.  48p.  0-7398-4983-2; lib.bdg., $27.12   Gr. 2-7    599.78

    Besides explaining what bears are, origins, bears and people, and conservation, there is basic information about food, reproduction, and behavior.  The photos are clear and aesthetically placed on the pages.  Although text is superimposed over a picture of a mountain habitat, the photo is muted and the text is easy to read.  This muted photo provides a background for quick facts as well as a border around each two-page spread.   Other sidebars are highlighted by a circle entitled “I Didn’t Know That” to impart such pictures.  Drawings, and facts such as Koala bears are not really bears, Pandas are very placid and only move from one food source to another, and the origin of the Teddy Bear. The basic information is clear and concise.  A glossary of terms, four age appropriate titles, and an index complete the book.  This is an example of a series book at its best.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Pringle, Laurence.  BATS!  STRANGE AND WONDERFUL . Illus. by Meryl Henderson.
    Honesdale, PA:  Boyds Mills,  2000.  32p.  1-56397-327-8; hb. $15.95   Gr. 1-6     599.4

    Pringle, known for excellent science books for intermediate and middle school students, has created an excellent picture book.   As usual, Pringle has researched a topic and turned it into an interesting book.  Henderson's illustrations have contributed significantly to the success of this book, making them a winning combination.  The fangs of the bat hanging upside down on the opening pages will grab readers and pull them into the book.  The subject is already one of interst to students and they will not be disappointed.  Pictures of over 20 bats are introduced.  A sample of a bat roosting box is included.  Megabats and microbats are included.  There are 800 kinds of microbats in the world and all of the bats in North America are microbats. This information and more are introduced in a book that school and public libraries will want to purchase for the science value as well as to introduce through Halloween displays.  If you already have the Gibbons book, you will want this one too; it is for a slightly older group and covers more material.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Pringle, Laurence.  SCHOLASTIC ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ANIMALS.  Photos by  Norbert Wu.  
    New York: Scholastic Reference, 29001.  128p.  0-590-52253-1;  hb., $17.95.    Gr. 3-8   590.3

    There are profiles for 140 animals from Alligator, Ant, Anteater through Millipede, Monkey, and Moose to Woodpecker, Worm, and Zebra.  Each profile begins with a phonetic spelling with the accented syllable in bold face type.  The last page is a pronunciation guide.  A glossary of 37 terms that were highlighted in the text of the profiles adds further information. The index seems redundant because the book is in alphabetical order.  This is a good value for library, school, and home reference.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Rounds, Glen.  BEAVER.  Illus by author.  New York:  Holiday, 1999.  32p.
    0-8234-1440-X; hb., $15.95.  98-28803   K-Gr. 3   599.37

    The large print and full page child like yet realistic color illustrations help children to understand the lifestyle and habits of beavers.  Each text page also has a black line drawing of a beaver on it.  Readers learn how beavers create ponds through their dams.  The book concludes with five fact/fiction questions.   This book is deceptively simple but helps young readers to learn much about beavers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ryden, Hope. WILD HORSES I HAVE KNOWN.  Photos by author. New York: Clarion,
    1999. 90p.   0-395-77520-5   lib.bdg. $18.00.    97-49021    Gr.3+     599.665

    Filled with gorgeous equine photographs, this book is as thoughtful as it is beautiful, as informative as it is exciting. Ryden is one of America's foremost authorities on wild horses and she feels that to understand the domestic horse, it is useful to understand how its wild counterpart lives.  Because of this she has spent the better part of three decades in horse country to observe and photograph the lifestyle and habits of free-roaming mustangs. Along with her fascinating observations, Ryden recounts personal adventures--some scary, some humorous, and some mysterious. Whether for a report of for the sheer enjoyment of reading, this one will win a blueribbon!
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba,MI.

Simon, Seymour. GORILLAS. New York: HarperCollins, 2000. 32p.  0-06-023035-5;
    hb., $15.95    0-06-23036-3; lib.bdg., $15.89  99-087161    Gr. 5-8     599.884

    Gorillas have two arms and two legs, and a head and body much like a human's head and body.  A gorilla also has five fingers and five toes.  And so ends the similarity.  Did you know that a gorilla has thirty-two teeth as opposed to twenty-eight for a human?   And needless to say, gorillas are much hairier than people.  However, Gorillas are not the scary beasts that they are so often portrayed. You will find the nature of a gorilla to be gentle, shy, and secretive.  The more you read about these anthropoids, the more interesting and fascinating they become.  And science author, Simon, provides just the place to learn the facts in a fun and interesting fashion.  Simon passes on information regarding gorilla behavior, habitat, physiology and daily life.  Together with the exuberant photographs, this a great title to either browse or use as a source for a report...providing there is no monkeying around!
    Pat Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

 Simon, Seymour. THEY WALK THE EARTH; THE EXTRAORDINARY TRAVELS
    OF ANIMALS ON LAND.  Illus. by Elsa Warnick. New York: Browndeer Press, 2000.
    unp.  0-15-292889-8 hb. $17.00.  98-38732    Gr. 4-8    599.156

     Simon, a highly acclaimed author, has done his homework on this work of art.  Written and illustrated to appeal to the young child who has a natural interest in animals and their behavior, the text is fascinating and will even lean to the sometimes mysterious.  Simon and Warwick bring life  to fascinating creatures that endlessly search for food, water, and safety.  Warwick's beautiful illustrations are a perfect accompaniment to Simon's intriguing text.  Books like this make learning fun.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Sousa, D. M.  SKUNKS DO MORE THAN STINK!  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook,
    2002. 32p.  2001-032958    0-7613-2503-4; lib.bdg., $21.90    Gr. 3-6      599.76

    Sousa helps readers understand skunks by comparing them in size to fluffy cats.  Photos help readers learn more about these animals.  Some facts about skunks include how they warn away other animals with their stripes, hissing and stamping their feet.  If that doesn’t work they lift their tails and spray their enemies.  What skunks eat and how they search for food, preparing for winter, and how skunks help farmers represent some of the types of information about skunks that are found in this book.  The glossary includes a dozen words that were in bold type in the text of the book.  There is a list of four books, one video, and three online sites.  Purchase for areas where the woodland habitat is studied.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
 

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599.5 MAMMALS -- DOLPHINS AND WHALES

Lindeen, Carol.  WHALES.  Translated by Dr. Martin Luis Guzman Ferrer.  Under the Sea Series. 
          Mankato, Minnesota:  Capstone Press, 2009.  24p.  ISBN: 978-1-4296-2285-1 hb. $21.27
          Gr. K-3      j 599.5

          Beautiful, fitting photographic imagery illustrates the text in this this bilingual Under the Sea offering.  Basic information is 
enhanced with a glossary and Internet sites. There is ample information for lower grade students.  The photography will fascinate 
browsers and preschoolers, making WHALES a worthy addition to public and school libraries, as well a Home School Curriculum.
          Barbara Ward, Retired Children's Librarian, Dickinson County Library

Rustad, Martha E. H.   DOLPHINS .  Ocean Life series.  Mankato, MN:   Pebble/Captstone,
    2001.  24p.  0-7368-0857-4; lib. Bdg., $9.95.   00-009860     K-Gr. 2     599.53

    Clear, interesting photos appear on the left-hand page and a large print sentence appears on the opposite page.  There is lots of white space so there would have been room for at least one or two more sentences.  There are captions on the photos to help readers to identify flippers, tail flukes, a blowhole, and a dorsal fin, all of which are explained in a list of “Words to Know” at the end of the book with four other terms.  Not all the vocabulary is easy to read:  for example, echolocation is not on any primary word lists.  There are also lists of three books and three Internet sites, as well as an index.  Elementary schools with a science curriculum that includes dolphins will find this book useful for primary grades and because dolphins are also interesting outside the classroom.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
 

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 574.52642 WOODLAND HABITAT


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