Picture Books

Subjects Listed in This Directory
 

Bedtime

Acredolo, Linda and Susan Goodwyn.  BABY SIGNS FOR BEDTIME.  Photos by Penny
    Gentieu.  New York: HarperFestival, 2003.  24p.  0-06-009076-6; bd.bk., $6.99   PreS   BB     

    Small children and babies of both sexes and several races are shown in photos in this board book as they use their fingers to make signs that can imitate bedtime vocabulary like bath, tooth, brush, book, and blanket.  The items appear on the left page but directions for the activity appear on the top of the page that includes the photo of the child.  Most are logical like “rest head on hands” for sleepy and “put finger across lips” for quiet.  “Wiggle fingers up high” to represent stars is more obscure.  However, following directions and interaction between an adult and a child with the appropriate actions is important in the development of a child.  This book can help in that development.  Directions for using this book written by two Ph.D.’s is that the book should be used as soon as the “child starts to wave bye-bye.”  Improvising is encouraged. Purchase for diversity as well as the activity value.  This book is a companion to BABY SIGNS FOR ANIMALS (HarperFestival, 2003).  If the library could only afford one of the books, chose the bedtime one.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Apperley, Dawn.  BLOSSOM AND BOO STAY UP LATE: A STORY ABOUT BEDTIME.     
    Boston:  Tingley/Little, 2002.  32p.  0-316-05312-0; hb., $14.95   00-067142     PreS-K     E

    This new book about the friendship of a little rabbit and bear, who through poetic license are the same size, discusses something little children think about often.  What happens after they go to bed?  Blossom and Boo discover that nighttime is dark, too quiet, then noisy, and scary so they hold paws.  When they become lost, fireflies help them find their way home.  Readers are not scared because they can see from the illustrations that the “night monsters” are only an owl and some bats that might be scared too.  In the morning they decide “Nighttime is nice for some creatures, but I like playing in the daytime better.”   Although not a first choice for small public libraries, the book will please fans of Blossom and Boo.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Apple, Margot. BRAVE MARTHA. Illus. by author. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.,
    1999.  32p.  0-395-59422-7 hb.  $15.00.   97-42616      Gr. K-2    E

     Martha's best friend is Sophie, her cat.  It is Sophie's nightly task to check under the bed to be sure there are no monsters.  However, guests come to spend the night....and bring their dog.  Sophie disappears.  So Martha is left to find the monsters on her own.  This book is great for any child facing fear of the dark.  The watercolor and pencil illustrations add to the humor and the use of nighttime colors varies the mood and heightens the tension.  Certain to be a repeat request at bedtime.
     Patricia Fittante, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Arquette, Kerry.  WHAT DID YOU DO TODAY?   Illus by Nancy Hayashi. New York:  Harcourt,
    2002.  32p.  0-15-201424-4; hb., $16.00.  98-17230   PreS-Gr. 1   E

    The question is the same on each of the double pages, only the name of the animal is different.  The animals are: dog, cat, pig, chick, hen, bunny, spider, bee, bear, ant, fish, bird, and owl.  The question is “What did you do today, little dog?/What did you do today?“  The answer is a rhyme that is not a couplet but a triplet and is followed by the same sentence, “That’s what I did today.”  The book ends by asking the question of a child who changes the pattern to four lines and ends with “Good Night,” making this a good read aloud at bedtime.  The text is much better than the childlike watercolor and color pencil illustrations.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ballard, Robin.  I USED TO BE THE BABY.  Illus by author.  New York: Greenwillow/Harper, 2002.  
    24p.  0-06-029586-4; hb., $15.95  0-06-029587-2;  lib.bdg., $16.89.  2001-023075   PreS   E

    Told in the first person by a preschool boy with a new baby brother, this book discusses a variety of ways he can help by feeding him, giving him toys, playing games, or being quiet when he is taking a nap.  The last page shows the big brother enjoying his mother’s lap because “…sometimes I like to be the baby too.”  The illustrations are child friendly.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ballard, Robin. TONIGHT AND TOMORROW.  Illus. by author. New York:  Greenwillow,
    2000.  24p.  0-688-167910-X, hb., $15.95.   98-50789   PreS-G. 2     E

    Done in first person, this comforting bedtime story is about a young boy who drifts off to sleep knowing that tomorrow his room will be full of light.  He anticipates the full circle of what tomorrow's routine will bring: a day at school, playtime with his best friend, feeding his cat, a bedtime story, and again a warm fuzzy good-night. The concept of time and sequencing is a bonus with this story while the theme itself should help to ease a young reader's nighttime fears.  The soft illustrations create a soothing effect.  Youngsters will snuggle down with comforting thoughts and sweet dreams after this nocturnal send-off.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Beck, Andrea. ELLIOT'S NOISY NIGHT.  Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can, 2002.
    32p. 1-55337-011-2; hb., $12.95    2002-900064-5    PreS-Gr. 2   E

    Anyone who has ever experienced a noisy night...join hands with Elliot!  Our favorite little bull moose pushes his worry button because he heard strange noises in the house the night before.  However, he is comforted by friend, Beaverton, who convinces him that the noises are nothing more than loose shutters, a vibrating furnace, and squeaky floorboards.  Fine....until later that night when Elliot awakens to new noises...shuffle, thump and swish.  Maybe it was an "Elliot-eating monster!”  Beck, in her clever way, tries to assure the reader that scary night noises can often become just regular everyday things when the lights go on.  Beck uses pencil and crayon to capture the emotions experienced by this lovable moose and proves that imaginations definitely work better when the lights are out.
    Patricia Fittante, Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Boelts, Maribeth.  LULLABY LULLABOOK.  Illus by Bruce Whatley. Harper Growing  Tree series, 
    New York:  HarperFestival, 2002. 14p.   0-694-01593-8;  bd.bk., $5.95.  PreS   BB    

    This is a first choice board book.  There are four-line verses for six animals and one human child.  What is different about this read-aloud bedtime story is the last word in each verse.  The Mama dove “sings her babe a lulla-coo.”  Other animals are cat (lulla-purr), owl (lulla-hoo), horse (lulla-neigh), trout (lulla-bubble), and cow (lulla-moo).  There are six age levels in this preschool series, and N stands for newborn.  Purchase this for personal giving, preschools, and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Branford, Henrietta.  LITTLE PIG PIGWORT CAN’T GET TO SLEEP.  Illus by Claudio Munoz.  
    New York:  Clarion, 2000.  32p.  0-618-15968-1; hb., $14.00.   PreS-Gr. 3     E PIC

    The smallest of a family of five little pigs, Pig Figwort can’t get to sleep.  The illustrations are all arranged in double-page spreads.  The second set of double-page spreads in the book is repeated, with a few differences, between each of Pig Figwort’s ideas of fun.  The various adventures include deep-sea diving, visiting the North Pole, and blasting off into space.  Finally the little pig falls fast asleep. The main character is adorable; he engages in each adventure with such enthusiasm that readers can’t help but be drawn into the story.  There is much to see in the illustrations and the looks on each of the animal’s faces are priceless.  This is a good choice for reading aloud at bedtime.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Buck, Nola.  HEY, LITTLE BABY! Illus. by R. W. Alley.  New York:  HarperCollins,
    1999.   unp.   0-06-9401200-9, bd.bk..   97-78011    PreS   BB

     The stock is heavier than a standard picture book, yet not as strong as a board book.  It definitely has the flavor of the latter, however.  The text  is done in rhyme, the illustrations are bright and bold--definitely targeted to the toddler and preschooler.  Kids will enjoy the antics of a bragging big sister who proudly proclaims that when Baby gets bigger she will teach him all the things that she has already accomplished-- including a whispered, "Nighty Night."
     Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Capucilli, Alyssa Satin.  WHAT KIND OF KISS?  Illus by Hiroe Nakata. New York: 
    HarperFestival, 2002.  12p.  0-694-01573-3; pb., $6.95.   PreS-Gr. 1    E     BB

    A little bear asks the same question of his Mama, Papa, Grandma, puppy, and a bird.  The pattern is broken when the mother asks her child (dear) the same question.  This excellent bedtime story has watercolor illustrations.  The parallel question is "What kind of kiss do you like, Grandma?/What kind of kiss do you like?"   Besides being a warm, fuzzy family story, it takes a child from "A good-morning kiss" to a "...sleep-tight, till-tomorrow kiss."   Except for the question asked by the mother, the three answers are found in fold-out pages.  The size is slightly larger than a board book format.  The paper is not of board book thickness but is much stiffer than regular paper so it will last through many openings even when read over and over by readers in day care centers and public libraries.  The question is not whether to purchase this book but whether to put it in the board book collection or picture book section.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Christelow, Eileen. FIVE LITTLE MONKEYS READING IN BED. New York: Clarion Books,  
           
2011. 32p.  978-0-547-38610-2 hb.$16.99   Gr. PreK-2   PIC 

            Mama has read her five little monkeys their bedtime stories and kissed them goodnight. She tells them that it’s bedtime; time to turn out the light. As little ones do, they plead for just one more story. A very tired mama wishes her impish darlings sweet dreams and closes the door. Illustrations of the monkeys crying at sad stories, howling with laughter at silly ones will have children giggling and the reader smiling. The hilarious rhymes flow and fit each two page spread of monkeys reading in bed and of mama trying to settle them for the night. This romp will be in high demand for rereading and checking out. What a great way to make reading and books desirable to little ones. Parents and caregivers should be prepared for pleading requests for ‘one more story’!
           
Barbara Ward, Retired Children’s Librarian, Dickinson County Library

Cuneo, Mary Louise. MAIL FOR HUSHER TOWN.  Illus by Pam Paparone. New York: 
    Greenwillow, 2000.  24p.   0-688-16525-7; hb ., $15.95    98-52877     PreS-Gr. 2      E

    Husher Town is an animal town on the side of a mountain where four animals (Bear, Cat, Donkey, and Ednabelle, a monkey) live in houses on Husher Street.  Julie has turned her green bedspread into this mountain where Donkey brings Bear a leather mail sack--- but there is no mail to deliver.  Then the action begins.  Although the point of the story is somewhat ambiguous, Cuneo's language lends an air of authenticity.  Paparone's acrylic illustrations display movement of the animals while they clearly remain toys.  There is nothing fearful, tearful, or off-the-wall to disrupt the persuaded calm of bedtime, but Julie's bedspread world makes an inviting stopping place to encourage drowsiness at the end of a busy day.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

DeVries, Maggie and Sheena Lott.  HOW SLEEP FOUND TABITHA.  Custer, WA: 
    Orca, 2002.  28p.  1-55143-193-9; hb., $16.96.   2001-097710    K-Gr. 3     E

    The large watercolor illustrations make Tabitha appear like a real child to listeners so children identify with Tabitha when she can’t sleep.  Animals call to her to sleep with them but there is a reason why she can’t do so.  For example, she can’t join the whale because “Tabitha didn’t have a breathing hole in her back, so she stayed right where she was.”  Other creatures that beckoned to her are frog, horse, snake, seal, and rabbit.  Finally a soft grey cat gets under the covers with her and Tabitha falls asleep.   The tail sticking out of covers adds to the charm of the book.  The soft watercolor illustrations add to the mood of this bedtime story and lull listeners to sleep.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Dunbar, Joyce. TELL ME SOMETHING HAPPY BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP.  Illus. by Gliori, Debi.  
    San Diego:  Harcourt, 1998. 32p.   0-15-201795-X; hb., $16.00   97-38562  PreS-Gr. 1    E

    This is a delightful getting-ready-for-bed book that young children will love for you to read to them over and over. Gliori's charming pastel paintings bring the bunnies to life.  Willa had trouble falling asleep and her brother Willoughby tells her all the happy things that await her in the morning when she wakes up.  Such as her chicken slippers that are waiting for nobody's feet but hers and the blue and white jumpsuit that is just longing for tomorrow, when Willa will jump out of bed and put it on.  An irresistible choice for story time and independent reading.  This is a reassuring bedtime story that is guaranteed to get your little one to sleep.
    Sally Harris; Bookmobile Outreach Coordinator, Menominee County Library; Stephenson, MI

Durango,Julia. DREAM AWAY. Illus. by Robert Goldstrom. New York: Simon
            & Schuster, 2011.  28p. ISBN: 978-1-4169-8702-4 hb. $16.99  Gr. K-3  PIC

            This lovely lyrical lullaby is written in poetic form, several of the pages following a clear aabb rhyming pattern. The authors also incorporate internal rhyme,alliteration and imagery to take the reader into a dream world from which they won't want to return.
Dreamlike illustrations make this book appealing.
            Joyce Hoskins, Teacher- L'Anse School Public Library

Fernandes, Eugenia.  BUSY LITTLE MOUSE.  Illus by Kim Fernandes.  Tonawanda, 
    NY:  Kids Can, 2002.  24p.  1-55074-776-2; lib.bdg., $12.95   PreS-Gr. 1     E

    Fimo modeling material was used to create the same little mouse that was in Fernandes’ SLEEPY LITTLE MOUSE.  (Kids Can, 2000).  A rhyme introduces eight animals.  The last of the four lines is the same for each animal: “What does the little dog (pig, sheep, cow, cat, duck, horse, mouse) say?”  It is unusual that the name of the baby animal is not used; i.e., puppy, lamb, calf, kitten, duckling, or colt.   The sound for each animal is repeated twice: “Woof! Woof!” or “Oink! Oink!”  The book ends with the little mouse going to bed.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Fernandes, Eugenie.  SLEEPY LITTLE MOUSE.  Illus by Kim Fernandes. Niagra Falls, NY:  
    Kids Can,  2000.  32p.  1-55074-701-0; lib.bdg.,  $12.95.  C99-932927-8    PreS-K    E

    No matter how her mother tries to get her to take a nap, Little Mouse resists.  Mother Mouse sings songs and reads stories but Little Mouse cries so much that her bed, a yellow and white tennis shoe, floats out the window, down a river, and out to sea.  All the sea creatures play with her until she is so tired she closes her eyes and the creatures sing her a song.  Her mother sails to her and tows her back to her room where she has a wonderful nap.  The illustrations have sharp clear lines and colors and are rendered in Fimo, a pliable modeling material.  This is a story that preschoolers can identify with because resisting naps is a common occurrence.  Use with individual children at home, in small lap sit programs in public libraries, or at day care centers.  Originally published in Canada, this book works well internationally.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Greenstein, Elaine.  DREAMING.  Illus by the author.  New York:  Levine/Scholastic,
    2000.  32p.    0-439-06302-7; hb.,   $15.95.     99-25125     PreS-Gr.2        E

     A  navy background  accentuates the mood of the this bedtime counting book illustrated with monoprints overpainted with gouache.  The illustrations evoke Van Gogh's "Starry Night" even though oils were used iin that famous painting.   Numerals from 10 to 1 are made up of stars and are accompanied by the word for each  numeral and a brief description of the picture.  A double page spread at the end of the book includes all of the previous images in one picture. This is a satisfying bedtime counting picture book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Grindley, Sally.  THE SULKY VULTURE.  Illus by Michael Terry.  New York:  Bloomsbury,
    2003.  26p.  1-58234-794-8; hb., $15.95   2002-019114      PreS-Gr. 2     E

    From mealtime to bedtime, a young bird, Boris; refuses to play games with other animal youngsters and sulks and stomps off when he loses.   Spots and stripes on the end papers represent the vulture’s friends.  Illustrations are large enough for sharing with a group in a pre-school story hour setting in a public library.  Each illustration of Boris shows a very sulky spoiled young vulture whose actions rival those of ROTTEN RALPH.  Besides showing how silly it is to act sulky, the book is also about unconditional love.  No matter how awful Boris acts, he asks for and receives a cuddle from his parents. Hopefully children will agree with Boris’s friends on the last double page spread and will see that being sulky and grumpy places them in an unflattering light.   
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Hooper, Patricia.  WHERE DO YOU SLEEP, LITTLE ONE?  Illus by John Winch. New York:
    Holiday, 2001.  32p.  0-8234-1668-2; hb., $16.95.   PreS-Gr. 3     811 or  E   PAULIN’S PICKS

    This is an exquisite picture book from the end papers to the oil on handmade paper because the animals are cut out and arranged in layers before being photographed, giving them a 3-D effect.  A variety of animals are introduced in the story with the same question:  “…where do you sleep?”  The animal answers.  The surprise ending makes this a Christmas book although it can be read throughout the year.  Animals are chipmunk, field mouse, fawn, wren, rabbit, and spider.  The last question is posed to the pony, goat, and sheep who reveal the final sleeping creature.  This book is a winner!
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Karas, G. Brian. BEBE'S BAD DREAM.  Illus by author.  New York:
    Greenwillow,  2000.  32p.  0-688-16182-0; hb $15.95    PreS-Gr 2   E

    When he originated this title, Karas drew from his own life experiences after witnessing his two young sons deal with the same confusion.  His resourceful heroine, Bebe, comes to discover the difference between dreams and reality with the help of a big dose of ingenuity.  The problem is solved.  Well, almost--the biggest problem being that Bebe still has to live with Walter, her brother and nemesis.  Karas captures the full emotional scope by changing the colors and intensity of his art when Bebe is in the dream state.  His humorous dialog and clever afterthoughts contribute to the resolution of both problems and just might encourage that young bedtimer to…dream on!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Kennedy, Kim.  FRANKENFROG.  Illus by Doug Kennedy.  New York: Hyperion, 1999.   32p.  
    0-7868-2323-2; lib.bdg., $16.49  0-7868-0373-8; hb., $15.99     98-44740     K-Gr. 2      E

    The Kennedys do the twist--and we don't mean the dance.  Undoubtedly inspired by the mad scientist, the famous weirdo, Dr. Franken, has a BIG problem.  The accidentally created Hyperfly spawns hordes of these buzzing pests, so.... how to get rid of them?   Invention #2: Frankenfrog---the ultimate exterminator.  The situation goes from havoc to hilarity and the story, which is filled with silly puns, is apt to have its young audience yelling, "Frankenfrog to the rescue!"  The illustrations are filled with amusing detail.  This story, with its amphibian twist, would make a good Halloween read.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Leuck, Laura.  GOODNIGHT, BABY MONSTER.  Illus by Nigel McMullen.  New  York:  Harper, 
    2002.  32p.  0-06-029151-6; hb., $14.99  0-06-029152-4 lib.bdg., $14.89     PreS-Gr. 3     E

    In this rhyming bedtime picture book, a baby monster is in his den with his mother: “Goodnight, baby monster, all warm in your den.”   The following double page  spreads include a couplet for the following babies: goblin, mummy, witch, bat, spider, dragon, ghost, swamp-thing, owl, black cat, werewolf, vulture, gremlin, and spooky baby (human).  Not even the smallest child will be afraid of these babies and their mother because they are look “warm and fuzzy” and their homes also share that non-threatening feeling.  A favorite scene is the mother/father and child reading a book together.  Because of the subjects, this book could also be used at Halloween time as a read aloud. 
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

London, Jonathan.  WHAT DO YOU LOVE?   Illus by Karen Lee Schmidt. San Diego: 
    Silver Whistle/Harcourt, 2000.  unp.  0-15-201919-7; hb., $14.00  97-49517   PreS    E

    The text and watercolor illustrations of a dog and his mother are large enough for reading aloud to a group.  All of the rhyming activities that are responses to the question posed by the title are familiar to preschoolers.  There is a good balance between concrete activities like jumping puddles and eating ice cream bars and more aesthetic activities like reading aloud and sunset clouds.  Because the book ends with hugs, kisses, and bedtime wishes, it makes a good book to read as a quieting or bedtime activity.  This title is particularly good for single mothers in families where there is no father figure because only a mother is shown.  However, it still works in two parent families.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Long, Sylvia.  HUSH LITTLE BABY.  Illus. by the author.  San Francisco: Chronicle,
    1997.  32p.  O-8118-1416-5, hb., $12.95.  96-28724.   PreS-Gr. 1   782.4   or    E

    In an introduction, Long explains why she wrote this parody of  "Hush Little Baby."  Long explains that the folk song explains what mommy will buy for baby (mockingbird; diamond ring) but she wanted the mother to provide love instead of just buying things.  The pen and ink and watercolor illustrations show a mother and baby rabbit who share experiences like hummingbirds, crickets, and shooting stars.  The favorite page for librarians is "When that star has dropped from view, Mama's going to read a book to you."  This is a book for all libraries and for personal giving.
    Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Melmed, Larua K.  A HUG GOES AROUND.  Illus by Betsy Lewin.  New York:
    HarperCollins, 2002..  32p.  0-688-14680-5; hb., $15.95  0-688-14681-3;
    lib.bdg.,     $15.89    00-068194   PreS-Gr. 3     E

    The pen and ink illustrations in this picture book are deceptively simple and extremely effective.  The expression of love that shows through them expresses the refrain, “A hug goes around,” perfectly.  The rhyming picture book begins with “A mountain goes up,/A valley goes down./Where does a hug go?/A hug goes around.”  Further verses take the family through the day until supper is over and the “little darlin’s” are asleep.  Parents who read books over and over to children at bedtime will appreciate the ending where the parents get to share a hug alone in the moonlight.  This book is a winner.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Mernick, Elsa.  BEDTIME.  Illus. by the author.  San Diego: Browndeer/Harcourt,
    1998. unp. 0-15-201471-3, hb.,  $10.00   96-50033    PreS.     E

     The designers of this book had the limits and capabilities of preschoolers in mind when they chose the large captions and easily identifiable objects children use when preparing for bed: the potty chair; toilet paper;  sponge and bathtub complete with yellow rubber ducky; special blanket; favorite book; nightlight; and more.   The bedtime rituals including putting toys away in the toy box are familiar and the watercolor illustrations are just right.  This book is the perfect present for first-time parents and should be included in collections at public libraries and day care centers.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Nobisso, Josephine.  THE MOON’S LULLABY.  Illus by Glo Coalson. New York:  Orchard/
    Scholastic, 2001.  0-439-29312-X; hb., $15.95.  00-39953    PreS-Gr. 2     E

    The watercolors and pastels in this book evoke the mood that precipitates the yawns that appear around the world. Yawning is catching.  Others that yawn in this bedtime story are a dog, the moon, a Spanish Abuelo, whales, seals, Inuits, Asian orphans, a koala mother and baby, Baba probably from the Middle East, a Masai boy, a Scottish hot-air balloonist and bagpiper, and a mother and child in the desert with a camel.  The book begins and ends with a mother and child in different parts of the world under the same moon.  Although only the Masai group is identified by name, the book is a multicultural enterprise that shares the idea of universality through a common human yawn.
      Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Numeroff, Laura.  10-STEP GUIDE TO LIVING WITH YOUR MONSTER.  Illus by  Nate Evans.  
    New York:  HarperCollins, 2002.  32p.  0-06-623822-6 hb. $15.95   2001-032312   PreS-Gr. 3   E

    Nobody could be afraid of monsters after reading these ten steps for living with them and seeing the boy’s benign looking green monster.  Even the fake reviews on the back jacket cover are funny and come from Good Monster-Keeping Magazine, the Journal of the American Monster Association, a testimonial from an eight-year-old, and more. At the end of the book, the tenth step is to “Always read your monster a bedtime story.  Do not tell a monster to count sheep.  Counting sheep will make him hungry.”  The author of IF YOU GIVE A MOUSE A COOKIE (Harper, 1985) has created another winner.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

O’Mara, Carmel.  GOOD NIGHT.  San Diego:  Red Wagon/Harcourt, 2001.
    16p.  0-15-202136-1; bd. bk., $3.95.  98-89366    PreS    BB

    This bedtime board book is particularly satisfying as a parent prepares a little bear for bed.  The narration consists of one or several words per page.  The book begins with a yawn and includes a bath, a bedtime story, and sweet dreams.  Young readers will identify with this anthropomorphic bear.  Highly recommended for day care, home, and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Puttock, Simon.  SQUEAKY CLEAN.  Illus by Mary McQuillan.  Boston:  Little,
    2002.  32p.  0-316-78816-3; hb., 13.95    2001-092468    Pres-K   E

    Three grubby little piglets do not want a bath but eventually enjoy the bubbles, rubber ducks, and the scrub brush.  After that mother takes her bath and enjoys the same three elements but when she finishes, she sees her piglets sneaking out to get grubby so they can have another bath.  Instead, she tucks them into bed--except for one who later escapes to take another bath.  The storyline is simple but encompasses the bedtime/bath time ritual for preschoolers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Radzinksi, Kandy. WHERE TO SLEEP. Chelsea, MI:  Sleeping Bear Press, 2009.
      32p.  ISBN: 139781585364367  $15.95.    Gr. K-3     E PIC

      Where to Sleep is a delightful story about a kitten looking for a place to sleep.  Each place the kitten chooses to sleep has a problem, like the chickens who talk all night. The setting is on a farm and the kitten wanders all over the place.  In the end, the kitten finds a best firend's feet.  The illustrator is also the author.  The artwork is large, colorful, and realistic for young listeners.  Even though the text is simple, there is room for a great deal of reader/listener interaction.
       Chris Collins, LibraryDirector, L'Anse Area School/Public Library

Riley, Katherine.  SONG OF NIGHT: IT’S TIME TO GO TO BED.  Illus by Linnea
    Riley.  New York: Blue Sky/Scholastic, 2002.  32p.  0-439-26678-5; hb., $15.95

    The illustrations in this book are perfect examples of “warm and fuzzy” and look like they were created by fuzzy color pencils.  The animals get ready for bed but the illustrations add little touches, like the rabbits looking at a carrot-shaped constellation, bunny slippers, a carrot pull-toy, a walnut shell crib for a squirrel, and kittens reading a bedtime story about messy mice after messy mice have already entered the story.  Other children who get ready for bed are a duckling, mice, cats skunks, bears, and squirrels.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Rylant, Cynthia.  BEAR DAY.   Illus. by  Selby, Jennifer.  San Diego: Harcourt, 1998.
    32p.  0-15-201090-4; hb.,  $12.00      96-40090    PreS-Gr.1     E

     On simple uncluttered pages,  Bear enjoys every day from beginning to end.  He wakes in  striped pajamas with a sock still on his head.  He eats grapes, adventures outside, meets and  greets friends and finally ends up back at night in his own warm house.  After saying his prayers,  Bear dreams about his  bear day with Teddy by his side.  Written in simple, relaxing rhyme and illustrated in soft soothing colors, Rylant has come through again with yet another winner
 that makes a perfect bedtime read.
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

Rylant, Cynthia. LITTLE WHISTLE'S MEDICINE.  Illus by Tim Bowers. New York:
    Harcourt, 2002.  unp. 0-15-201086-6; hb., $15.00   99-12382   K-G. 2    E

    Living in a store called Toytown, the latest adventure of a guinea pig, Little Whistle, is an unexpected little game of doctor.  Anticipating listening to the nightly stories read by wooden toy soldier, Little Whistle instead finds his friend, Soldier, out of sorts, lying on the floor with a bumped head.  No stories for guinea pig and the baby dolls tonight!  Little Whistle offers to help Soldier and he sets out to ask his toy store friends for their assistance.  Little Whistle just knows that he can find something to make Wooden Soldier feel better.   Bear offers a hat, China Doll Violet offers to sing a lullaby but it is mother doll who comes up with the solution.  Soldier is restored to health and the stories begin.  Rylant's simple, but satisfying language couples with the expressive, yet realistic oil-on-canvas paintings of Bowers to come forth with a bedtime or storyhour book that will prove that magical things always happen when Little Whistle is on the loose.
    Patricia Fittante, Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Schertle, Alice.  GOOD NIGHT, HATTIE, MY DEARIE, MY DOVE.
    Illus by Ted Rand.  New York:  HarperCollins,1985, 2002.  32p.  0-688-16022-0;
    hb., $15.95   0-688-16023-9; lib.bdg., $15.89   00-054111   PreS-Gr. 1     E

    This is both a bedtime and a counting book.  Hattie held a parade of her ten stuffed animals and dolls.  As each number is announced in the book, there is a description of the toy; i.e., “Three was Tom, who used to sing “Yankee Doodle” until something inside him went snap!/Though he couldn’t sing anymore, Tom still looked very smart in a parade.”    Ten was Hattie herself.  Daddy watched the parade and Mama played the piano.  Then the menagerie marched to bed and Daddy tucked Hattie in.  Then one by one, Hattie decided she needed her toys with her.  Her excuses were varied.  “Wait,” said Hattie.  “Tom wants to sleep in my bed.  He’s afraid of the dark.”/ “I haven’t turned the light out yet,” said Mama./ “Tom will make a fuss when you do,” Hattie told her./  So Tom came out of the toy box, and then there were 4 in Hattie’s bed.”  After each addition the parents took turns saying “Good night, Hattie, my dearie, my dove.”  This is a charming bedtime story.  Parents will probably hope that their “dearie” will not emulate this bedtime ritual with a parade of their own.  Although this is a read-aloud, the vocabulary is simple enough for beginning readers to tackle on their own.  In any case, listeners will enjoy taking part in the refrain.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Simmons, Jane.  DAISY SAYS “HERE WE GO ‘ROUND THE MULBERRY BUSH.”
    Boston:  Little, 2002.  14p.  0-316-79811-8; bd.bk., $7.95    2001-23041   PreS   BB

    There are seven index tabs to this board book, each of them showing a creature. The last tab shows the moon that appears when little duck goes to sleep, making this a suitable bedtime book for preschoolers.  The verses are a takeoff on a familiar children’s song.  As this version begins, a duckling watches butterflies ’round the mulberry bush in the morning.  Children can make the actions, go ‘round, bounce, flap, hop, pounce, leap, and go to sleep.  Creatures are duck, bee, rabbit, kittens, and frog.  In larger, darker print at the bottom of the page are other action words kids can shout or act out; i.e., stomp, bong, flitter flutter, hoppity-hop, thump, and doing.  A companion book is DAISY SAYS “IF YOU‘RE HAPPY AND YOU KNOW IT.” (Little, 2002).  Purchase for preschools, public libraries, and personal giving.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Spalding, Andrea. IT'S RAINING, IT'S POURING.  Illus. by Leslie Elizabeth Watts.
    Custer, WA; Orca, 2001. unp. 1-55143-186-6; hb. $15.95   00-110528     PreS-Gr. 2      E

    This is one of the nursery-rhyme songs that once you start singing it, it just won't stop circling through your head.   At least not until you go to bed like the Old Man and snore up a storm.  Spalding has put a twist on this tale, however.  Little Girl, who incidentally hates thunder and wants to play, is not satisfied with the answer her mom gave her as to why the Old Man is stuck in bed, so she sets out on an imaginative journey to find the answer.  Grabbing a "laddery" ladder, Little Girl climbs through the clouds and finds a giant who is in bed because he is feeling poorly.  She makes a return journey home to retrieve some honey and lemon, some gingerbread cookies, some scarves, and a hot water bottle.  Her generous spirit is rewarded when the Old Man turns off the storm and like all happy-ever-after books, Little Girl can go out to play.  Watts' illustrations aptly shuttle readers between reality and fantasy in this work of art that is sure to be a real tonic on a rainy-in-the-house day.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Uff, Caroline.  LULU'S BUSY DAY.  Illus. by author.  New York:  Walker, 2000.
     32p.  0-8027-8716-9; hb.,    $14.95.     99-3611    PreS- K      E

     Lulu moves throughout her day from drawing a picture to reading a book and finally falling asleep.  When she is at the park, Lulu pretends to be a duck and swings with her best friend, a boy.  When she is at the park, readers are asked to participate by identifying five things that Lulu sees there.   The illustrations are large enough for reading aloud to a group.  No adults appear in the book.  There really isn't any plot, just activities with which a child can identify.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Waldherr, Kris.  HARVEST.  Illus by author.  New York: Walker, 2001.  32p.
    0-8027-8792-4; hb., $15.95  0-8027-8793-2; lib.bdg., $16.85     K- Gr. 3     E

   The soft muted watercolor and gouache illustrations on the end papers are used to frame the individual pictures.  In most cases, the words in different type are reproduced in the illustrations on the opposite page.  Some of the pages are double-page spreads.  One discordant note is on the page where the text says that the girl is plucking herbs like sweet basil and dill but shows her picking pink daisies or asters.  The illustrations on the opposite page show either sunflowers or black-eyed susans that are mentioned in the text.  Otherwise, this is an acceptable gardening book that begins with planting and ends with a harvest moon and “time to rest”  in bed with a cat.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Walsh, Melanie.  MY BEAK, YOUR BEAK.  San Diego: Harcourt, 2002.  32p. 
    0-618-15079-X; hb., $15.00    PreS-Gr. 1     E     PAULIN’S PICKS

    Children are introduced to Dashshunds, Dalmations, Sharks, Goldfish, Penguins, Robins, Lions, Kittens, Bush babies, and Bats.  But more importantly readers learn that although creatures are different, they have elements in common.  What a great way to accept similarities and differences in people.  The illustrations are large enough and colorful enough for them to be seen by an audience when read aloud.  This is an essential purchase.  This book can be used as a bedtime book because the only word on the last page is “goodnight!”   
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Weare, Tim.  I’M A LITTLE PUPPY.   Illus by author. Finger Puppet Pal series.  New    
    York: Scholastic Cartwheel, 2002.  12p.  0-439-40642-0; bd.bk., $6.95   PreS  BB

    A latex puppet attached to the last page shows through to the cover via a die cut circle.  The puppy plays with four friends and on the last page they say good night to him. This rhyme is told in the first person by the puppy.  This board book allows readers to interact with the story.  There are several problems with this book.  The size of the puppy is not in scale with the ducks, pigs, cows, and hens.  If this book is purchased by libraries, a large notice about the latex content of the puppet needs to be prominently featured on the cover so those allergic to latex can beware.    
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Wiles, Deborah.  ONE WIDE SKY: A BEDTIME LULLABY.  Illus by Tim Bowers. San Diego: 
    Gulliver/Harcourt, 2003.  32p.  0-15-202334-8; hb., $16.00     PreS-Gr. 2      E

    Oil paintings of animals and people in a back yard begin and end with one wide sky and go up to ten and count back down again.  Locating the proper number of items is challenging for preschoolers in this rhyming counting book.  Anyone who has ever camped in the back yard and has appreciated the nature there will especially like this book but those who have not done so can be part of the experience vicariously.  Because this picture book ends with camping in the evening , it makes a suitable bedtime book.    
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Willard, Nancy.  THE TALE I TOLD SASHA.  Illus. by David Christiana.  Boston:
    Little, 1999.  32p.  0-316-94115-8; hb., $15.95   97-18201     K-Gr. 3     E

    Fantasy and nonsense are the mixture found in this poetic story of a yellow ball that is lost and found in the realm of an imaginary world that belongs to Sasha.  "Believe, Believe!" is what the sailor calls as he invites readers to follow the yellow ball as it rolls and bounces across the pages of this book that is filled with color and could tell the story without the text.  As could the poem be read without the illustrations.  But put the two together and what have you got?  A story that starts with a die-cut circle which shows Sasha peering through on one side and ends with golden endpapers that match the color of the yellow ball, on the other.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Wolfe, Myra. CHARLOTTE JANE BATTLES BEDTIME. Illus. by Maria Monescitto. New York:
            Harcourt Children’s Books, 2011. 32p. ISBN 978-0-15-206150-0 hb.$16.99   Gr. PreK   PIC

            When Charlotte Jane is born, her admiring pirate parents, declare that their baby has ’formidable oomph’! She does indeed, and as we turn pages, she grows from babyhood learning to talk, walk and play, using her considerable imagination. Charlotte pretends that she is a swashbuckling pirate, hunts treasure and performs daring feats….going down a slide head-first. Her days are so full that she doesn’t have time to sleep. Charlotte is endearingly drawn; her parents garbed as colorful pirates and as befuddled with bedtime as any contemporary couple. The lesson in this pirate themed bedtime story is done with a light hand. While not a necessary purchase, it is one to be enjoyed.
            Barbara Ward, Retired Children’s Librarian, Dickinson County Library,
Ziefert, Harriet.  BUZZY'S BIG BEDTIME BOOK.  Illus. by Emily Bolam.  Mapleton, NJ:
      Blue Apple Books, 2004.  ISBN: 1593540590 hb. $9.95.   PreS-K    E PIC
      Buzzy prepares for bed in this book.  The book is divided into two parts.  In the first part Buzzy takes a bath and in 
the second part he gets ready for bed.  This is a simple rhyming story and young children will connect with the theme 
of the book.  The pages in this book are slightly thicker than regular pages, but not as thick as a board book.  This would 
be a good transition book from a board book to a regular picture book.
      Denise Engel,  Director, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

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Color

Cohen, L. Caron.  HOW MANY FISH? Illus. by S. P. Schindler. My First I Can Read 
    Series. New York: Harper, 1998. 24p.  0-06-027713-0; hb., $12.95  
    ISBN 0-06-027714-9; lib.bdg. $12.89    97-14512     PreS-Gr. 1    ER

    The title and cover illustrations are inviting and informative to the reader and participants.  The format of this easy reader  is done well.  The type size is large and displayed up and down to swim the reader along.   The fish and feet are given character that keeps the audience involved in the story.   You can go to the seashore, cool off your toes, use your counting and color skills, and witness the saving of one happy yellow fish.
    Sue Danielson; Birch & Central Grade School Libraries, Ishpeming Public Schools, Ishpeming, MI
    
COLORS
.  First Discovery, Look-Inside series.  New York: Scholastic Cartwheel,
    2001.   10p.  0-439-29727-3; bd.bk., $4.95  PreS   BB

    Several of the pages in this board book have die cut openings so that preschoolers can see through to the color on the next page and can review the last color.  The last page shows all six colors of the rainbow.  Several pages are devoted to green but blue and purple share a page that has a flap showing another picture underneath.  One double page spread is a review showing a duck.  The beak and head are identified as yellow and green.  Readers are asked what other colors they see but only black, brown, and white are included in the duck and none of them are mentioned in the book nor are part of the rainbow.  On the opposite page is a green apple with touches of yellow.  Since a previous grapefruit was identified as yellow-orange, perhaps readers are to identify the apple as yellow-green.  This is quite a sophisticated concept for board book readers.  Without looking at the caption, the grapefruit could be mistaken for an orange.  There are too many confusing elements in this book.  There are better board books about color.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Dijs, Carla.  HALLOWEEN COLORS.  Illus by author.  Turn-the-flap series.  New York:
    Scholastic Cartwheel, 2002.  12p.  0-439-40355-3; bd. Bk., $6.95.    PreS    BB  

    This clever board book is a scary but not too scary Halloween title for preschoolers.   The dozen board book pages show five multicultural children and one father while the smaller flaps place masks over the faces to make a black cat, blue pirate, red alien, yellow monster, green dragon, and a white mummy.  The flaps appear sturdy enough for library circulation.   This book could be placed in several sections--board book, holiday, or color/concept collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan
 
Edwards, Pamela Duncan.  ROAR!  A NOISY COUNTING BOOK.  Illus. by Henry Cole.  
     New York:  HarperCollins,  2000.  32p.  0-06-028384-X; hb. $15.95    99-34958    PreS-Gr.1      E

     This counting book in rhyme moves from 1-10 through a story about a little lion who inadvertently scares away the other animals with his roar.  It is not until he finds nine other little roaring cubs that he does not intimidate.    It will be impossible to keep one child or a group of children from roaring at the end of the book. The illustrations are large and clear for reading aloud but it is unfortunate that part of the picture is lost in the fold for two pink flamingos, six green crocodiles, and eight brown gazelles.  The book also introduces ten colors.   The LC subject lists this book as a jungle book but it is really about grasslands animals.  The blurb on the back flap utilizes the pattern of the story to introduce the author and illustrator.  These biographies could be used as models for children studying grasslands to create their own bios.  Purchase for school and public libraries for the counting story or the grasslands and color connections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Holm, Sharon.  ZOE’s HATS:  A BOOK OF COLORS AND PATTERNS. Illus. by Sharon Holm.  
    Honesdale, PA:  Boyds Mills Press, 2003.  32 p.  ISBN: 1-5907-8042-6; hb., $13.95.  PreK   E

    Zoe is a cheerful red-headed little girl, who obviously enjoys playing dress-up.  Her hats are all different styles, colors, and patterns, and she does love modeling them.  The last three pages group the hats and ask the reader to identify the colors and patterns.  The brightly colored illustrations feature Zoe’s head and shoulders, and most of all, her hats.  A young child will smile with Zoe and learn to name colors and patterns, such as zig-zag, flowery, polka-dots, and plaid.  I suspect that Kindergarteners will quickly be bored with this book.
    Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Library Board of Directors

Hutchins, Pat.  LITTLE PINK PIG.  Illus. by author.  New York: Harper Trophy, 1994.
     32p.   0-688-17516-3; pb., $5.95    93-18178   PreS-Gr.2   E

     Although this is strictly not a picture book about color, there is color in the title.  Little pig's mother asks him to hurry, he asks her to wait for him, but she doesn't hear him.  There is lots of repetition as Mrs. Pig looks for him and asks a horse, cow, sheep, and chicken where he is and they look for him together.  Cumulative picture books that allow audience participation using animal sounds are popular; this is a good example.  The paperback price makes it accessible for home and classroom collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Inkpen, Mick.  KIPPER'S BOOK OF COLORS.  San Diego: Red Wagon/Harcourt,
    1999. 20p.  0-15-202285-6;   bd.bk.,  $4.95 0-15–2000647-8; pb., $6.00
    95-155199   Pre-K     BB

    Ten colors are introduced with humor by Kipper, a dog.  The colors are true except for orange which looks almost the same color as Kipper who is included on the brown page.  The only text is the name of the color but there is plenty to discuss about the pictures.   This is a great board book for children ages 1-3 years old.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Lobel, Anita.  ONE LIGHTHOUSE ONE MOON.  Illus. by author. New York:
    Greenwillow, 2000.  32p.  0-688-15539-1; hb., $15.95    0-688-15540-5; lib.bdg.,
    $15.89   98-50790  PreS-Gr. 3    E

     "All Week Long" shows the same cat on pages for Monday through Sunday along with different colored human feet, legs, and shoes such as Tuesday's red shoes.   "Nini's Year" shows the same cat, which readers learn is named Nini, in each frame along with a sentence about each of the twelve months.  "In the last month, Nini waits for good things and the following page shows her with her new kittens.  "One Lighthouse, One Moon" shows Nini only on the first and last page.  The numerals move from one to ten with a nautical theme.  The lighthouse appears in illustrations in the first and last story but does not figure in the narration.  The double page spread at the end of the book shows one hundred stars and one moon.  This picture book shares four concepts with readers: days of the week, color, months, and numbers from 1 to 10.  It's like having four books instead of one to make an excellent choice for preschool, school, public and home libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Robertson, Patrisha.  CIRQUE DU SOLIEL:  A PARADE OF COLORS.  Ilus. with
    photographs by Al Seib, Veronique Vial, Jean-Francois Gratton.  New York:  Harry N.
    Abrams, Inc., 2003.  30 pgs.  ISBN 0-8109-4515-0; hb, $15.95       K-Gr. 6   E
   
    This wonderfully creative way to present colors is a visual delight.  The rhyming text is written to appeal to primary school aged children, but the photographs of Cirque du Soliel performers in their exotic costumes, postures and make-up have wider application.  Those with an interest in theater and drama could learn much about costuming and staging, and budding photographers could benefit by studying the lighting and composition of the photos.  A magical book!
    Carolyn Anderson, L'Anse, Retired Elementary Teacher, Public Library Board

Rodrigue, George.  WHY IS BLUE DOG BLUE?   Illustrated by author.  New York, NY:  
    Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2001.  40 p.,   ISBN:  1-58479-162-4; hb, $16.95     K-2    E 

    This is a story about colors and imagination.  The main character, Blue Dog, was originated by George Rodrigue in the 1980s.  The premise of this story is that by using unlimited color choices and imagination, an artist, or anybody, can have a great deal of fun creating his/her individual concept of how a single image, in this case a dog, might reflect the happenings around him, whether it be a trip to the beach or just baking a cherry pie.  This book will appeal to the very young as a story and to the imagination of the budding artist. 
Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Library Board of Directors
 
Russo, Marisabina.  THE BIG BROWN BOX.  Illus. by the author.  New York:   Greenwillow, 2000.  
    32p.    0-688-17096-X; ; lib.bdg., $15.95.  99-148671       PreS-Gr. 2    E

     Sam uses the washing machine box for a playhouse which he pretends is a house, a cave, and a boat.  His  little brother wants to play with him but Sam won't let Ben play with him.  Finally his parents gave Ben a smaller box so he can also pretend.  The book ends with the boys playing spaceships in their separate boxes. This book handles the age old problem of younger siblings who want to play with older siblings.  The concepts of sharing, color, and big and little are also addressed.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Saul, Carol P.  BARN CAT: A COUNTING BOOK.  Illus by Mary Azarian.
     Boston: Little, 1998.  32p.  0-316-76113-3, hb., $15.95.    PreS-Gr.2   E

     Azarian's uses hand-colored woodcut prints to create attractive double spread pages with the numeral in the upper right corner along with a picture of the cat and objects from nature.  The double page spreads bleed successfully into each other except for the swallows where one beak and part of the head are missing in the fold.  Each of the first four creatures are identified by color:  two brown crickets; three black-and-orange butterflies; four gray swallows.  Repetition of the red barn door provides a fifth color so this book could also be used to introduce colors although it would have been better if the red barn were a brighter shade of red; it almost looks brown.   The story does not end with the 10 sparrows but continues on until barn cat finds what she is looking for, someone (a girl) who has narrated the story.  The story could have ended with the number 10 but from that point it seems to switch from third person to first person when in reality it is the narrator who finishes the story.  Since the cat and the little girl are both female, there is some confusion about the who is doing the speaking when the counting part stops and the last part begins.  These flaws aside, you don't have to be a cat lover to like this book.   Children will enjoy all three aspects of this handsome picture book.   Teachers will use it for color, counting, and nature studies.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Sis, Peter.  BALLERINA!  Illus by author.  New York:  Greenwillow/Harper, 2001.  32p.
    0-688-17944-4; hb., $14.95.  00-035401   K-Gr.3   E      PAULIN’S PICKS

    Sis, known for his psychological picture books, has gone into the psyche of a girl who loves ballet.  Based on the book’s dedication, the inspiration was his niece.  Except for the smile on her face that is in red, Terry’s world is in black and white except for a beige picture frame that becomes a mirror when she looks into it.  As she exercises and dances, the dancer of her perception appears in color in the frame.  The only color on Terri is her costume that matches the color of the costume in the mirror.  As Terri dances, she becomes characters in four famous ballets including “Nutcracker” and “Swan Lake.” At the end of the book seven colors are introduced in the scarves she wears and the following page folds out to include all eight of the adult ballerinas as they bow for the audience.  The story and watercolor illustrations work together in concert to produce a book that is simple yet profound.  Even the end papers show Terri the child ballerina in black and white except for her red smile. This is a book for anyone who has dreams and ambitions.  The quote on the back cover by Baryshnikov is the frosting on the cake.  Look for this book in the winner’s circle of children’s book prizes this year.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Snyder, Carol.  WE’RE PAINTING.  Illus by Lisa Jahn-Clough. New York HarperFestival, 2002.  
    24p.   0-694-01445-1; hb., $9.95.  2001-088483     PreS-Gr. 2    BB   or   E

    A boy and girl paint through this rhyme with zest according to the rhyme and illustrations.  They mix colors, paint shapes, and splatter and splash.  The final mural provides colorful self-portraits of the artists.  Judging from the smiles on their faces, the pair have had fun creating their masterpiece.  Shape and color are shown as sidelights of the activity.  The physical features on the two children are similar, only their flesh tones are different.  This book is a hybrid, a cross between a picture book and a board book.  The length is shorter, the pages are thicker than in a picture book, and the size is larger than a board book but the pages are not as thick or as spill-proof as pages in a board book.  This series provides a good transition between the two formats.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Walsh, Ellen Stoll.  FOR PETE'S SAKE.  Illus. by the author.  San Diego: Harcourt,
    1998. unp.  0-15-200324-X.     hb.,  $15.00   97-25677   PreS-Gr. 3    E

     Pete, an alligator, thinks he is a flamingo and wants to be pink like everybody else.  The others tell him not to worry because "You probably aren't ripe yet.  It takes longer for some."  When Pete sees some green flamingos (alligators) that look like him, he discovers that "I'm different but the same," and the pink flamingos counter with "Well for Pete's sake, Pete," they said.  "You always have been."  Without being didactic, the ideas of conformity and individuality are introduced so that preschoolers and primary students can understand.  They will also see the humor in Pete's thinking he is a green flamingo.  This book can be used to introduce pink and green colors and counting two and four.   The cut paper collages complement the text.    Public and pre-school libraries will appreciate  this book and school library media specialists will want to show it to their counselors.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Williams, Sue.  LET'S GO VISITING.  Illus. by Julie Vivas.  San Diego:  Gulliver/Harcourt,
    1998.  unp.  0-15-201823-9,  hb., $15.00     97-34398     PreS-Gr. 2      E

    Vivid watercolors bring a boy and his dog to life.  Preschoolers will enjoy repeating the question "Let's go visiting.  What do you say?"  And beginning readers will enjoy being able to read them.  This picture book is also a counting book because they meet one brown foal, two red calves, three black kittens, four pink piglets, and  five green ducklings.  The green ducklings are not realistic, but the other colors are true to real  animal colors even though not crayon colors.  Very few of the words are too difficult for beginning readers; it is a treat to have a picture book that primary children can read themselves.  The illustrations are large enough to make this a satisfying read-aloud as a quieting activity because the boy curls up with his dog and puppies at the end.  This versatile picture book deserves a place in collections.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Wood, Audrey. BLUE SKY.  Illus. by author.  New York, NY: Blue Sky Press, 2012.
            32p. ISBN 978-0-545-31610-1  hb.$16.99   Gr. PreS-K     Easy PIC

            From the opening pages of Blue Sky, with its double spread title across the top and multi-racial heads of munchkin-like children pointing upward, the depictions of the changes in the sky are appealing and smile provoking. Each double spread is identified by two simple words, which describe the brilliantly illustrated skies in phases from morning sun to moon sky and all the possibilities in between. Children will easily identify rainbows, clouds, rain, sunset, as the small family inhabiting the pages enjoys the day from beginning to end, and will enjoy identifying what the family is doing. Looking the boy’s ever present stuffed monkey will be a bonus I Spy game for little ones. Each spread is stunning, begging to be revisited many times. Libraries of all sizes will want a copy for their shelves.
            Barbara Ward, Retired Children’s Librarian, Dickinson County Library, Iron Mountain

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Community/Culture

Adler, David. MAMA PLAYED BASEBALL. Illus. by Chris O’Leary.  San Diego:
    Gulliver/Harcourt, 2003.  32p.  0-15-202196-5 hb.  $16.00   Gr. 1-5    E or  FIC 

    Oil paintings help set the mood for the 1940s and wartime America.  Amy’s father, a former milk truck driver, is overseas fighting.  His father shows Amy his medal from the last war and they listen to The Jack Benny Show.   The story is told in the first person by Amy whose mother gets a job playing in the women’s baseball league.   Amy practices with her mother, goes with her to tryouts, and attends home games with her grandparents.  The book ends “The war was over.  My dad was home.”  Background information about the All-American Girls’ Professional Baseball League is provided in the “Author’s Note.”   This book is useful with intermediate and middle school students for Women’s studies and World War II.   
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan
  

Asare, Meshack.  SOSU'S CALL. Illus by author. LaJolla, Cane/Miller, 2002. 37p.
    1-929132-21-2 hb.  $15.95   2001-038820    Gr. 2-4    E

    Sosu, a young disabled African boy, is shunned because the village people believe that it is bad luck to have someone incapable of walking, living in their village. Two fishermen tell Sosu's father to keep him in the house.  With only his dog, Fusa, to cheer him up, Sosu sits in his yard day after day watching the chickens; happy to do so because he feels there is nothing to envy about them.  A story that touches on the themes of courage and prejudice, it is a bit weighty in the narrative, but the third-person narration helps the reader learn of Sosu's feelings and how he learns to deal with them. Quiet hues dominate the watercolor illustrations but the final double page spread bursts with a soft rainbow of pastels that seem to celebrate the wheelchair that Sosu receives for his heroic actions when a terrible storm threatens the village.  While there is never a doubt that Sosu will be a hero, it takes some stretch of the imagination to accept the dog's actions as credible.  However, the serious physical challenge of Sosu coupled with his achieving acceptance may be inspiring to the young reader.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Augustin, Barbara. ANTONELLA AND HER SANTA CLAUS.   Illus by Gerhard Lahr.  LaJolla, CA: 
    Kane/Miller Publishers, 2001. 40p. 1-929132-13-1 hb.  $14.95  2001-131314     PreS-Gr.3     E

    Two talented Germans team up to create a young Italian, Antonella, who still believes in Santa Claus, much to the chagrin and mocking by her classmates  Nevertheless, Antonella sends her letter off anyway, via a balloon.  The balloon lands in a schoolyard in Hugary where it is read by students who pool their money to satisfy Antonella's wish--rollerskates.  The illustrations have a definite European look as well as setting.  They are full of action, yet in the balloon scenes there is a feeling of quiet and calm.  The Christmas message is heartwarming and undoubtedly this title will be a holiday favorite.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Bannerman, Helen.  THE STORY OF LITTLE BLACK SAMBO.  Illus. by Christopher Bing. 
    New York, NY:  Hand Print Books, 2003.  36 pgs. 1-929766-55-6 hb.  $17.95   Gr. K- 2    E

    The illustrator took a favorite childhood tale, LITTLE BLACK SAMBO by Helen Bannerman, and updated the pictures to suit a twenty-first century audience.  Bing’s unique illustrations are so bright they shine out through the page.  He uses fine black line to shade and texturize the pictures, and a thick black line to frame each page.  It is magnificent!  He has also included some history about the original writer and the controversy that surrounded this book the second half of this century.  I am happy to see the story back in this historic and thoughtful volume.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Carter, Anne Laurel and Alan and Lea Daniel. UNDER A PRAIRIE SKY.  Custer, WA:  
    Orca, 2002.  32p.  1-55143-226.9 hb. 16.95.   C2001-910591  K-Gr. 4     E

    Told in the first person, this picture book story is about a boy who wants to be a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police when he grows up.  He helps his Dad harvest wheat in the beginning of the last century.  After they are finished his Dad says he should find his younger brother before a storm hits.  The boy puts on his serge coat, Stetson hat, blue breeches, and polished boots and saddles his black horse, Bess.  Out on the prairie, he pretends he is a Mountie on a mission.  The boy looks near a grain elevator, into the valley where the berries grow, pat a coyote, a heron, and wide open spaces.   Then he finds the little charmer “catching frogs in the slough.” At the end of this satisfying book, the little brother is safe in bed.  Purchase to learn about the Canadian prairie, as well as for a good story about pretending.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Cox, Judy.  RABBIT PIRATES: A TALE OF THE SPINACH MAIN.  Illus by Emily Arnold McCully. 
    San Diego:  Harcourt, 1999. unp.  0-15-201832-8 hb.  $16.00.    98-17481    Gr.  K-3+

    Two retired rabbit pirates run a restaurant called the Spinach Main in the south of France. When a fox, Monsieur Reynard, comes to eat, he scares away their business.  Their method of getting rid of him without violence is ingenious.  Before reading the end, ask children to asked to  provide solutions of  their own.  A glossary at the beginning of the book includes the 16 French words that appear in italics in the text.   High school or middle school French teachers can use the book to introduce  French food or Provence.  Or they can ask their students to read the book to younger children.  The theme of the book, that problems can be solved without violence, is carried out without didacticism.   McCully, a Caldecott winner,  has again provided watercolor paintings to enrich the text.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Edwards, Michelle.   PA LIA'S FIRST DAY.   Illus. by author.  New York:
     Harcourt, 1999.  50p.  0-15-201974-X hb. $14.00.    Gr.K-2    E

     This beginning reader is a simple story about Pa Lia Vang who is starting school and making friends.  Her first day is a disaster in her mind, as she suffers the new-kid-on-the-block anxieties.  Her feelings are strengthened by the pen and ink inkwash drawings that Edwards creates to make the reader further feel Pa Lia's fear, embarrassment, desolation and joy.  Readers will revel in the humor, but share the sensivity that Pa Lia experiences as do many children when they experience a first of anything.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library

 Greene, Carol.  SUNFLOWER ISLAND.  Illus  Leonard Jenkins.  New York: HarperCollins, 1999.  
    32p.  0-06-027326-7 hb.  $14.95.  0-06-027327-5 lib.bdg.  $14.89.   97-10703     Gr. 1-3.    E

    Based on a true story, this book says something timeless about rivers, people and time.  The neat, clean text weaves a clear true-to-life feeling while the almost abstract appearance to the illustrations helps to push the reader into a rerun mode.  This story is about Polly who was but a young girl.  From her bedroom window she witnessed the sidewheeler, Sunflower, strike a snag and gradually sink in the river.  But as the years passed, the river, the dirt, the birds and seeds helped create Sunflower Island from the skeleton of the wrecked ship.  Polly watched its growth and Polly watched its death when the river swept it out to sea.  Nevertheless, her family listens to her story countless times over the years, from generation to generation.  Now is your turn to hear Polly's story!
    Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

Johnston, Tony.  A KENYA CHRISTMAS.  Illus. by Leonard Jenkins.  New York:
    Holiday House, 2003.  unp.  0-8234-1623-2 hb.  $16.95   Gr. 1-5   E

    It's December in Nairobi, and the narrator is expecting a visit from his Aunt Aida.   The pair decided to bring Father Christmas to the village.  However, Nairobi doesn't have snow, sleighs, or reindeer.  They use their common sense to modify the event and make it a whole village celebration.  And then a miracle happens to make it the best Christmas ever!  The illustrations are very life-like and use the vibrant colors of the African landscape.  The backgrounds are composed of pattern and color, and give a dream-like quality to the illustrations.  It's a beautiful book and a charming story for any audience.  There's also a handy glossary of the colloquial terms used in the story.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Howland, Naomi.  THE MATZAH MAN: A PASSOVER STORY.  New York:
    Clarion, 2002.  32p.  0-618-11750-4 hb.  $15.00.  2001-1028482   PreS-Gr. 3    E

    After he rolled out his Passover matzah, Mr. Cohen created a little man whom he popped into the oven.  When he opened the oven, the matzah jumped out and said “Hot from the oven I jumped and ran,/So clever and quick, I’m the Matzah Man!”  Then the story follows the pattern of the familiar “Gingerbread Man.”  The characters that are part of this cumulative tale include a red hen, Cousin Tillie, Auntie Bertha, Grandpa Solly, Miss Axelrod, a goat, and a boy named Mendel Fox.  The name of the boy tips off readers what will happen during the seder supper.  A “Passover Glossary” of seven terms helps those who are unfamiliar with the Jewish Passover celebration.  The illustrations, executed with gouache and cut-paper collage with colored pencil, along with the end papers; evoke a 1940s family celebration.  The illustrations and text work together to create a story that is both familiar and unexpected.  This is an exceptional picture book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Kurtz, Jane. FARAWAY HOME.  Illus. by E.B. Lewis. New York: Harcourt, 2000.
    32p.   0-15-200036-4 lib bdg.  $16.00.      96-47664      Gr. K-3      E

     America is her home, so why does her father want to go back to the country where his roots are planted?  Desta begins to worry.  Will her father truly belong in the village of his youth in Ethopia or here in America with her?  Will her father's love for her and her family be strong enough to connect his two worlds and cultivate a desire in him to return to America?  Lewis, a Coretta Scott King Honor winning artist, offers powerful illustrations that create a picture of an American immigrant family and the mental conflicts these families experience.  Home really is where the heart is!
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library

Lawson, Julie.  THE KLONDIKE CAT.  Illus by Paul Mombourqauette.  Tonawanda,  NY: 
    Kids Can, 2002.  32p. 1-55337-013-9 hb.  $15.95   C2001-903443-1    Gr. K-5    E

    The oil paintings add significantly to this story about a boy and his father who catch gold fever and leave their home to hunt for gold in the Canadian Yukon.  Noah smuggles his cat, Shadow, along instead of a sweater that he needs later.  Although they didn’t strike gold, they make money and gold dust selling Shadow’s kittens.
This is a versatile story; a tender father/son family story, animal story, adventure, as well as historical fiction.  Readers learn about hardships on the trail in an interesting manner. This is a worthwhile addition for school and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Lee, Milly.  EARTHQUAKE. Illus by Yangsook Choi. New York:  Farrar, 2001.
    32p.   0-374-39964-6 hb.  $16.00.  E

    A retired school librarian tells in the Author's Note provides additional information about the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.  Lee tells readers that the narrator, the Chinese-American girl in the story, is her mother.  More information about Kwan Yin, Buddhist Goddess of Mercy, is given.  However, more accurately, Kwan Yin is Toaist rather than Buddhist.  What is staggering, but not unlikely given the times, is that the death toll is probably higher because women, children, Native Americans, African Americans, Japanese and Chinese immigrants were not listed because the death toll came from voter registration and property ownership lists which would not have included them.
    This first person narrative begins when the shaking earth wakes a family who gathers all they can carry, puts on extra layers of clothing, and meets in Porsmouth Square in Chinatown.  The book culminates as they take refuge in Golden Gate Park.  The illustrations are somber, in keeping with the tragedy.  Although the afterword explains who Kwan Yin is, the picture of Po Po (grandmother) getting the statue ready for the journey shows only the shadow, not the form or substance of the deity.  Otherwise the illustrations portray the events of the brief narrative which is a slice of history and reminds us of the ethnic flavor of San Francisco, then and now.  It also reminds families of the importance of retelling and recording family stories.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Lensey,  Namioka.  THE LAZIEST BOY IN THE WORLD.  Illus. by  Xuan, YongSheng.
    New York: Holiday, 1998.  unp.  0-8234-1330-6; hb., $16.95   97-9053    Gr. 2-5    E

    As a baby Xiaolong didn't cry or kick because it was too much work.  He only washed half of his face each day because washing the entire thing would be too strenuous.  Xialong did not play, bend, stand, or do much of anything because he was "The Laziest Boy in the World."   Xiaolong never minded being lazy until one night when a burglar broke into his house to steal the family's most beloved possessions. Will this unfortunate event snap Xiaolong out of his lackadaisical ways? Or will he continue carrying the title of "The Laziest Boy in the World"?  In this book Namioka gives the reader a taste of old world China, the lifestyle of its people and the value of their first-born son.  Especially if the other children were female.  Illustrated with bold cool colors, both words and pictures paint an image of this lazy boy's recess from the laborious tasks that confront him. A neat book for an elementary class in social studies.
    Charlotte Oshe, Children's Assistant,  Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Leonard, Marie. TIBILI: THE BOY WHO DIDN'T WANT TO GO TO SCHOOL. Illus.Andree
    Prigent. LaJolla, CA: Kane/Miller, 2002. unp. 1-929132-20-4; hb. $15.95    Gr. 1-3      E

    Although the book was first published in France, the theme is universal.   Be it in the American schools or the savannah of Africa where the story is set, there is a familiar reluctance to any first-timer to school. As the subtitle suggests Tibili is reticent about going off to school as a newcomer.  He is generally a happy African boy, but at this point and time in his life he resorts to animal friends to help him solve his problem.  These friends send him on a search that ends with a piece of paper that contains a message....that he can't read!  Tibili then visits Crope, a spider, and it is his cunning and intellect that causes Tibli to understand why it is important to learn to read and write. This is a modern story with the elements of folklore---animals who talk and a boy who learns a lesson.  Prigent's art is child-like and appealing in its bright bold hues.  This is definitely a contrast from the usual starting-school books, but one that will help alleviate the apprehension and insecurity that a child of the age experiences while waiting for the school bell to ring.
    Patricia Fittante Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Lester, Alison.  ERNIE DANCES TO THE DIDGERIDOO.  Boston:  Houghton Mifflin,
    2000.  32p.  0-618-10442-9; hb., $15.00  00-040680   Gr. 2-4    E

    Using the same format as she used in CELESTE SAILS TO SPAIN (Houghton, 1999), Lester introduces readers to Arnhem Land, Australia; an area populated by the Aboriginal people for over 40,000 years.  Ernie goes there to visit for a year and readers are introduced to the actions of several aboriginal children as he reports back to his friends about his activities.  Without realizing it, readers learn lots of information about Arnhem Land.  The simple sentences are easy to read and “Meanings and explanations” at the end of the book explains new vocabulary.  A list of the seasons, complete with phonetic spellings, appears at the beginning of the book as well as the circumstances under which the book was written.  The book is based on the author’s experience in Gunbalanya where she worked with school students in a variety of creative projects.  The total layout of the text and illustrations is aesthetically pleasing and will attract the attention of readers.  There is much to see and learn in this picture book and readers will enjoy doing both.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Machlin, Mikki.  MY NAME IS NOT GUSSIE.  Illus by author.  Boston: Houghton
    Mifflin, 1999. 32p.   0-395-95646-3;hb., $16.00   99-19160   Gr. 2-5    E

    In today's society when even young people show interest in tracing their roots and have a desire to create their own family tree, this title will be valuable in prompting a discussion about immigration and early twentieth century America.  Done in a series of vignettes taking one back to the early 1900's, grandmother Gussie relates how she survived a boat voyage in steerage class only to reach the shores of the "Golden Land" and have her name changed on a whim by an inspector.  Little wonder she sounds slightly bitter and upset.  However, the stories are interesting and well paced and sprinkled with humor and surprise and are infused with expressive paintings that provide a comfortable visual complement. The folkloric style of the individual episodes include age-old traditions that, told through the eyes of a child, help the reader realize that wishes can come true, even in foreign places.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

McGrory, Anik.  MOUTON'S IMPOSSIBLE DREAM. Illus. by author.  New York:
    Harcourt, 2000. 32p.   0?15?202195?7; hb. $16.00       K-Gr.3    E

    The place: Southern France.  The year: 1783.  The main character: Mouton who brings shades of memories of my mother's fur coat when I was a child.   The plot: On an eighteenth?century French farm, there lives a sheep with an impossible dream.  She wants to fly.  The friends, Cocorico, a rooster, and Canard, a duck, are sympathetic but realistic and try to convince Mouton that without wings, this dream will never take flight either.  However, Mouton is full of hope and determination and who knows?  Maybe dreams really do come true.  You will have to read it to find out.  This enchanting title is filled with historical detail and unsparing illustrations that include dialogue balloons that contain simple, easy?to?decipher French.  Hobbie has invented a heroine and fun?loving friends who incorporate the universal theme of following one's dreams and triumphing against great odds.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Morris, Carla. THE BOY WHO WAS RAISED BY LIBRARIANS. Illus. by Brad Sneed.
          Atlanta GA: Peachtree, 2007. 32p. ISBN: 1561453919 hb. $16.95  Gr. K-5   E Pic

This book will warm the hearts of librarians, teachers, and those who love learning.  It is the story of a boy who loved 
reading and learning, helped every step of the way by three librarians.  As he grows up and goes to college, he keeps in 
touch with  the librarians, eventually coming back to work in the library that he loves.  
          Ann Best, Bookmobile Assistant, Menominee County Library

Nobisso, Josephine.  THE MOON’S LULLABY.  Illus by Glo Coalson.  New York:
    Orchard/Scholastic, 2001.  0-439-29312-X; hb., $15.95.    PreS-Gr. 2       E

     The watercolors and pastels in this book evoke the mood that precipitates the yawns that appear around the world. Yawning is catching.  Others that yawn in this bedtime story are a dog, the moon, a Spanish Abuelo, whales, seals, Inuits, Asian orphans, a koala mother and baby, Baba probably from the Middle East, a Masai boy, a Scottish hot-air balloonist and bagpiper, and a mother and child in the desert with a camel.  The book begins and ends with a mother and child in different parts of the world under the same moon.  Although only the Masai group is identified by name, the book is a multicultural enterprise that shares the idea of universality through a common human yawn.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Nolan, Janet.  THE ST. PATRICK'S DAY SHILLELAGH.  Illus. by Ben F. Stahl. Morton Grove, IL:
    Albert Whitman & Company, 2002.  unp.  0-8075-7344-2  hb; $15.95    Gr. 2-6   FIC       
   
    Before leaving Ireland for America to escape the potato famine, young Fergus cuts off a branch of his favorite blackthorn tree.  On the ship over, he carves this branch into a shillelagh.  On each St. Patrick's Day, he tells the story of the potato famine and his journey to America.  The shillelagh is passed down to his descendants who keep Fergus's story alive.  This book is an excellent starting point for discussions on family oral traditions as well as family
treasures which teachers and parents will want to add to their library.  The acrylic illustrations add to the vibrant story.
    Jolene Hetherington, Teacher, Munising Public Schools, 12 years of teaching experience 

Oppenheim, Shulamith Levey.  YANNI RUBBISH.   Illus by Doug Chayka.  Honesdale, PA: 
    Boyds Mills,  1999.  32p.    1-56397-668-4; hb., $15.95     98-71791   Gr. K-4      E

        This book is sure to tug at the heart strings of any child who has been teased or made fun of by his peers. Yanni is a young boy who is taunted by his friends because of his job collecting garbage in a small Greek village. He does this in the absence of his father who is working in Germany.  Fortunately he has an understanding, easy-to-talk-to mother and together they come up with a wonderful plan.  Chayka's illustrations are done in oil; each one a work of art which adds a cultural flavor to this keeper.
        Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Reynolds, Marilynn.  A PRESENT FOR MRS. KAZINSKI.  Ill. by Lynn Smith-Ary.
    Custer, WA: Orca, 2001.  unp. 1551431963; hb., $15.95   K-Gr 2   E

    Inspired by Reynolds' childhood memories of living in several locations
across Canada with her single mom, there always seemed to be an old lady who lived nearby.  These women became her friends and she immortalized one in the title character.  Mrs. Kazinski, the old woman who lives in the attic of the old Grant Street rooming house, turns eighty on Sunday and Frank, who lives with his mother in the back rooms on the main floor, is her friend.  He wants to give her the best present in the world, but nothing seems good enough.  It isn't until he asks all the eccentric residents in the house and discards their ideas, that Frank finds a stray kitten.  He is reluctant to give it up, but he does relent and the reader is left knowing that Frank's gift is something even more precious than this small furry critter.  Smith-Ary's richly detailed artwork brings the varied cast of characters warmth and personality and carries the story back to the inner-city community of the 1950's.  A story of friendship across the generations that is sure to leave the younger generation asking for a rerun.
    Patricia Fittante Children’s Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Stafford, Liliana.  THE SNOW BEAR.  Illus by Lambert Davis.  New York: Scholastic,
    2000.  32p. 0-439-26977-6; hb., $15.95.  00-06977-6    Gr. 1-3     E

    Bruun, an Inuit boy, saw the polar bear feed at the town dump.  She was alone because hunters had killed her cubs.  She was thin but the men who kept her in the bear-jail couldn’t feed her or she wouldn’t go away when released after the sea-ice froze over.  Bruun secretly fed the bear fish and soon he replaced her cubs in her heart.  When it was time to leave, the bear refused to go.  So Bruun took her into the wilderness but when he became lost, the bear offered warmth and brought food to the boy.  In spring, the bear tried to push away her boy but Bruun wouldn’t go.  Finally the bear led Bruun back to town but the boy was unhappy.  He went back to find the bear and asked her to take him back but she chased him away and he returned to the town.  When Bruun was grown, he went hunting in the old way and eventually he saw his snow bear who was now old and starving.  Because he knew she would not survive the summer, he was going to kill her with his harpoon but he couldn’t.  Bruun stayed until the bear died but she lived on in his memory when he told the story to his son.  The illustrations make the setting realistic.  This is a dichotomy because according to the “Author’s Note,” the relationship could not have happened because polar bears are wild animals.  This makes readers wonder why she wrote the book but her explanation is that the book “came in response to my searching for answers about nature, tradition, and the power of love.  I hope her story will stir others to do the same.”
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Stuchner, Joan Betty.  CAN HENS GIVE MILK? Illus.by Joe Weissmann.  Custer, WA : Orca
      Book Publishers, 2011.  32p.  ISBN: 9781554693191; hb. $19.95.      PreS-Gr. 3  PIC

      Stuchner sets this humorous story in the mythical village of Chelm, populated according to Jewish folklore, by fools.  Tova and her family live on a small farm, but they only have chickens and a rooster.  Her mother longs for a cow so they can have milk and cheese. One night a dream sets into motion a series of comical events to try to get milk for the family. Weissmann's acrylic illustrations are wonderfully done and enhance the comedic quality of the story.  The text in this circular story flows easily and would make a great read-aloud at a story time for children ages 3-8.  The author uses repeated phrases and the children will love to Bock, bock, bock,--hic along with the chickens! 
    
 Denise Engel, Director, Wakefield Public Library, Wakefield, MI

Teague, Mark. FUNNY FARM. Illus. by author.  New York: Scholastic Inc., 2009.
      32p.  ISBN: 978-0-439-91499-4 hb. $16.99.   PreS - 1    E PIC

      The jowly canine, Edward, visits his Aunt and Uncle at Hawthorne Farm. Teague's farm animals are hillariously 
illustrated as they work and play. The sheep are depicted brushing their teeth and washing their faces in the watering 
trough early in the morning, as Edward and the pigs yawn and rub the sleep from their eyes. Each page spread highlights a farm chore with laugh-aloud humor. The only jarring spread is the depiction of making maple syrup which has snow on the ground. Although it is a spring story, the other spreads clearly shows green grass, dandelions and leaves on trees. Except for that faux pas, it lives up to the expectations that Teague's name carries.
      Barb Ward, Children's Librarian, Retired, Dickinson County Library

Thomas, Patricia.  FIREFLY MOUNTAIN.  Illus. by Peter Sylvada.  Atlanta: Peachtree
     Publishers, 2007.  ISBN: 978-1-56145-360-3 hb. $16.95.  Gr. K-3      E PIC

     The seasons on a farm are marked by the captivating beauty of changes in nature: the return of birds, growth of 
flowers, long, warm summer afternoons, and for this farm family, the phenomenon of the fireflies lighting up an entire 
mountain. The story unfolds poetically, describing the anticipating of this exciting moment accompanied by dazzling, 
impressionistic oil illustrations. It is a short  story which will stimulate a child's interest in the small creatures of nature.
  Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Wells, Rosemary.  YOKO.  Illus. by author.  New York: Hyperion, 1998.  32p.
     0-7868-0395-9; hb. $14.95    0-7868-2345-3; lib.bdg. $14.89    PreS-Gr.1    E

     Yoko is an Asian-American kitten who goes to first grade where her classmates, other animals, laugh at her traditional lunch.  To solve the problem, her teacher, a fox, writes a note to parents to provide food for International Food Day.  Yoko's mother makes sushi for the entire class and readers see the other families and the dishes they provide.  The teacher wants everyone to try everything but no one touches the sushi so the teacher's plan is foiled.  However, Timothy Raccoon is still hungry and tries the sushi and Yoko shows him how to eat it with chopsticks.  The two decide to open their own restaurant at school and become friends.  The book is realistic because finicky eaters often outwit the best intentions of adults.  The book's appeal is on the universal themes of being different and the value of friendship.  This was one of my favorite books for this year.  Because the children are first graders, share it with children first grade and below even though the theme is useful to share with children up through third grade.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Williams, Laura E.   TORCH FISHING WITH THE SUN.  Illus by Fabricio Vanden Broeck.   
      Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills, 1999.  32 p.  1-56397-685-4; hb., $15.95    Gr. K-3     E

    The author precludes her story with a brief background of her growing up in Kahala, Hawaii. Williams paints a memory of her father who had a great influence on her life and in turn will influence the lives of his grandchildren (whom he had never seen) through the impact he had on her.   Because of this emotional tie, a book was born. It is a story of young Makoa who is proud of his grandfather even though he is getting old and weak and the other fishermen belittle him.  Makoa begins to have doubts.  Does Grandfather really catch big fish with the fire of the sun? Makoa has heard that his grandfather paddles his canoe to the other side of the island and buys fish, so Makoa must decide if he believes the words of his grandfather or the words of the others.  The soft acrylic illustrations fill a two-page spread.  Some of the pages are a wallpaper background for the text but give an over-all warm enveloping effect.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Yang, Belle.  CHILI-CHILI-CHIN-CHIN.  Illus by the author.   San Diego:  Silver Whistle/ Harcourt,
      1999. 32p.    0-15-202006-3; hb., $15.00    98-15891   PreS-Gr. 2      E

    "When I run, my bells sing, 'chili-chili-chin-chin.' That's how I got my name." So says the free-spirited donkey who tells the tale.  He also tells of his love for the boy who named him and just what the ingredients are that make for a best friend---loving, caring, sharing.  Yang uses soft, easy text as opposed to bright vibrant art work to create a story that will warm your heart and leave you asking for more.
        Patricia Fittantte; Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library
 

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Concept Books

Alda, Arlene.  HURRY GRANNY ANNIE.    Illus. by Eve Aldridge.  Berkley, CA:
    Tricycle Press, 1999.  32p.  lib.bdg.    $14.95      99-11180      PreS-Gr. 2      E

     "Have to hurry.  Can't be late."  This is what the high-spirited energetic Granny proclaims to her grandkids, Ruthie and Joe and their friends, as she races past.  Intrigued by her repeated refrain, the children join in the chase picking up small animals along the way.  Granny skids to a stop on a bluff overlooking the ocean just in time to "catch" the sunset. The children are bummed, but hang around long enough to look and then to appreciate the lines that give the illustrations the contrast necessary to create chaos and tranquility.  This title is meant to be shared with children, but also appreciated by adults.  It should remind all its readers to slow down and smell the roses.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Appelt, Kathi.  INCREDIBLE ME!  Illus by G. Brian Karas.  New York: Harper, 2003. 32p.
    ISBN 0-06-028622-9; hb. $15.99.   0-06-028623-7 lib.bdg. $16.89    PreS-Gr. 3      E

    A small girl bounces through the pages enjoying her uniqueness in this rhyming picture book.  The book begins  “Nobody has my singular nose/Nobody tips on my ten toes” and ends “I’m the one, the only, incredible/ME!  The rest of the book also celebrates her individuality.  This picture book can be used for bibliotherapy or just for fun.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Arnosky, Jim.  ALL ABOUT FROGS.  Illus by author.  New York: Scholastic, 2002. 32p.
    0-590-48164-9; hb., $15.95  2001-020680    K-Gr. 3     597.8      PAULIN’S PICKS

    Beginning with the lily pads on the end papers, this is a beautifully illustrated and designed science book.  Acrylic paints serve as backdrops for the type which is 16 point and helpful to beginning readers.  The illustrations flow seamlessly from page to page and add significantly to a text that is informative and interesting.  One particularly stunning picture is a bullfrog whose eyes virtually pop out of the page.  There is great variety in the illustrations to further enchant readers.  Readers learn about amphibians, differences between frogs and toads, many types of frogs worldwide, food, noises, metamorphosis, predators who hunt and eat them, and labeled views.  There is no glossary but Arnosky does an admirable job of defining terms as he goes along.  This is an exemplary science picture book that deserves consideration for a variety of prizes.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Bailey, Linda.  THE BEST FIGURE SKATER IN THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD. Illus. by Alan & Lea 
     Daniel.  New York: Kids Can Press, 2001. 32p.  1-55074-879-3; hb. $15.95    PreSc-Gr. 2      E

     In her mind's eye, Lizzy is someday going to become a champion figure skater.  She faithfully practices her spins, leaps and lutzes around the living room in anticipation of taking lessons but when the real thing happens, Lizzy realizes that skating is not as easy as the performers on TV make it look.  But Lizzy promises herself she will practice and practice  and practice.  And that she does.  Hard work is supposed to reap its own reward, but not for Lizzy.  Despite all of her hard work, Lizzy's hopes hit rock bottom when she is cast to be a tree.  A tree, that doesn't move, doesn't twirl, but just stands still.  However, on the day of the show, Lizzy's creative spirit and spunk shine through and help erase the disappointment that she harbors.  The emotional reactions of Lizzy throughout the story are strongly visible in the mainly gouache illustrations.  This book should cut a fine figure with all who pick it up or read it from cover to cover.
     Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Bailey, Debbie.  THE HOSPITAL.   Photos by Susan Huszar.  Toronto:  Willowdale/
    Annick/ Firefly 2000.  14p.    1-55037-632-2; bd.bk., $5.95    PreS    BB

    This is an excellent book for any small child who is going to have a hospital stay or is just curious about what happens in a hospital.  Bailey explains in gentle detail some of the things that go on in a hospital from the meals that are served to getting an X-ray.   Photographs of children who are staying in the hospital accompany the written word and tell a story of their own.  This is a four-star book.  I recommend it for all children from toddler through first grade, especially if they are going to have to be in the hospital.  It will satisfy their curiosity and help erase some of their fears.  This board book is also available in Spanish.
    Charlotte Oshe; Children’s Assistant, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Ballard, Robin. MY DAY, YOUR DAY. Illus by author. New York: Greenwillow/Harper, 2001.
      32p.  0-688-17796-4; hb $14.95.  0-06-029187-7; lib.bdg. $14.98   PreS-Gr.2     E

    This is a clever and informative picture book.  The premise is explained in the first two sentences.  “My day is at day care.  Your day is at work.”  Each illustration on the left page shows children engaged in activities at day care like planting seeds.  On the right hand page, the text says “Planting seeds.”  The sentence is accompanied by three pictures of adults engaging in activities that have to do with plants.  This pattern is repeated for 9 other activities.  On the last page the children are reunited with parents.  The pen and ink and watercolor illustrations are a good complement for the text.  This picture book serves several functions.  It gives children the assurance that they will be picked up by their parents at the end of the day, equates their job with their parents’ jobs, and introduces community helpers.  It is unclear why there is a period at the end of the single phrase or word on the pages because none of them are complete sentences.  This feature mars an otherwise perfect picture book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Bang, Molly.  WHEN SOPHIE GETS ANGRY-REALLY, REALLY ANGRY.  New York: Scholastic, 
    1999.   32p.    0-590-18979-4 hb.,     $15.95     97-42209   PreS-Gr. 2    E

     Vibrant colors and active shapes convey the changing emotions of this preschool
child.  The story line is appropriately simple, yet the message is powerful as Sophie runs the gammit of emotions, finding a way to deal with these emotions herself.  The illustrator's choice of color changes to reflect Sophie's mood.  First, reds become redder as Sophie's anger increases, and the outline around Sophie also deepens in intensity.  As Sophie seeks the calming influence of nature, these colors gradually change to cooler tones of blues and greens.  The book ends as Sophie is welcomed back into her family.  Children can discuss how they handle their emotions after reading this book.  Sophie provides an excellent model as she demonstrates her resourcefulness and capability in dealing with her own emotions.  This book was awarded the 2000 Caldecott Honor Medal.
    Sandra Imdieke, Professor, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI
    *Editor's Note: Imdieke was a member of the 2000 Caldecott Committee, ALSC, ALA

Bauer, Marion Dane. BEAR'S HICCUPS.  Illus. by Diane Dawson Hearn.  Holiday House, 
     1998.  48p.  0-8234-1339-X, hb. $14.95.  97-10881 Gr. 1-2.    ER

    All children can relate to Bear's feelings of, "It's all mine!"  While the reading level is appropriate for beginning readers, the content is inviting to the higher level readers as well.  Bear has to deal with the blistering heat of a midsummer day and he certainly doesn't appreciate any "countryside friends" getting in his way.  When one does just that, it sets up the mystery and suspense that will entice readers to actively predict and read on to discover the ultimate outcome.  The plot is kept simple, yet interesting.  There is repetition of some phrases, which also encourages active reader participation.  The illustrations,  a complimentary addition to the text,   are especially beneficial in adding to the elements of humor and emotion.  Without being "preachy", this book is a great example of how sharing applies to everyone, big or small.  Sequel to TURTLE DREAMS.
     Kathy Amsbury; NMU Student Teacher, K I Sawyer Elementary School, Gwinn, MI

Bechtold, Lisze.  EDNA’S TALE.  Boston:  Houghton, 2001.  Illus by author.
    32p.  0-618-09164-5; hb., $15.00  00-036945   PreS-Gr. 3 E

    The pink and other pastel colors painted in gouache are perfect for introducing a cat that is vain about her tail.  Edna does have a “most fantastically fluffy tail” and she spends lots of time sitting in the window so others can admire her tail.  Readers will enjoy when the bright rose color of the shampoo splashes across the page on to Edna as she prepares her tail for her walk.  Edna thinks she is being chased by a monster because her damp sticky tail collects leaves and twigs during her travels in the forest giving her the illusion that she is being followed.  Her antics for ridding herself of the monster give the other cats, including the new one, a show to remember.  Edna learns her lesson about being vain in a clever and unusual way without the story being didactic.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Bernhard, Durga.  TO & FRO:  FAST AND SLOW.  Illus by author.  New York: Walker, 2001.  
    32p.  0-8027-8782-7; hb., $15.95  0-8027-8783-5; lib bdg.,    1001-017874    Gr. K-4    E

    If a reader moves through this picture book reading only the words, the impression is that this is a concept book about opposites.  However, reading the dedication and the illustrations, readers learn that the girl is a child of divorce who moves through her parents' different worlds.  Mother lives in the south in the country and her father lives in a city in the north.  Readers get a good view of the contrasts between the two lifestyles.  As the girl moves to and fro between the two homes, there is no judgment about one being better than the other;” they are just different.  Because there are so many children who live in two different worlds, this is an excellent book for children of divorce.  Because she is accorded love in both places and her parents act civilized towards each other; there is also a message for the parents who read the book with their children.  Most of the "story" in this successful picture book is told through the illustrations.  Sometimes the antonyms are full pages side by side and sometimes they are split page double spreads.  This varying pattern of diagonal and triangles in addition to the horizontal pattern provides added interest for the viewer.  The illustrations are very child friendly and child appealing.  This is a first purchase this book for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Bourgeois, Paulette. FRANKLIN GOES TO THE HOSPITAL.  Illus. Brenda Clark. New York:  Kids
    Can Press, 2000. 32p.  155074?7320 hb.,$14.00.  Scholastic 0-439-08370-2 pb., $4.50   PreS-Gr.2    E

    The ever popular turtle, Franklin, has to go to the hospital.  Although he has been sick before, he's never had the hospital experience.  What could be worse than a turtle playing soccer, getting hit in the chest, and having a cracked chest? (Unless it is Mousekin with his tail in a trap.)  Dr. Bear comes on the scene and has to insert a pin in Franklin's shell to allow the shell to heal properly, but she gives a gentle explanation of what will happen during surgery.  Franklin tries to be brave, but any young child will understand exactly how Franklin really feels.  The story moves with Franklin at the hospital, including the operating room, and provides a satisfying ending. Clark's brightly-colored and detailed illustrations, combined with Franklin's positive attitude, make for a story that will comfort and assure any youngster who is facing his/her first hospital stay.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Boutignon, Beatrice.  NOT ALL ANIMALS ARE BLUE.  LaJoya, CA: Kane/Miller
            Book Publishers, 2009.  ISBN 978-1-933605 hb. $15.95  Gr. PreS – 2   E PIC

Less of a story than a workbook, the subtitle for this book is “A Big Book of Little Differences,” which characterizes the underlying theme.    Each two-page spread is divided into a picture of five animals in action.  One sentence describes them.  The other page has five sentences that describe each animal, but they are not in order.  Readers can match the descriptive sentence to the animal through reading comprehension, focusing on the large, colored keyword, matching the color or the keyword to the picture, or through the process of elimination.  This book is ideal for young children to read with adults who can discuss differences in the pictures and reinforce correct identifications. 
               Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library

 Brown, Marc.  ARTHUR'S FAMILY TREASURY:  THREE ARTHUR ADVENTURES IN 
    ONE VOLUME
. Boston: Little, 2000. 108p.  0-316-12147-9; hb., $18.95   PreS-Gr.3    E

     The first question to be asked when several picture books are combined into one volume is whether or not text or illustrations have been sacrificed.  The answer in this case is positive.   The complete text of three picture books ARTHUR'S BIRTHDAY (Little, 1989), ARTHUR'S FAMILY VACATION (Little, 1993), and ARTHUR'S BABY (Little, 1987) appear in the same order with the same text.  One modification is that some of the lines are longer, resulting in fewer lines.  In the first book, the colors are adequate but not as vivid as in the original.  In the last story the illustrations are the same or in some cases more vivid than the original.  At the time of reviewing his book, the middle title was checked out and not available for comparison. The type is bolder in the original picture books and is preferable to the type in the compilation.  On the other hand, the end papers are lively in the compilation and show the faces of many of the characters in the "Arthur Books."  Another addition in the compilation is a picture of Marc Brown and Mr. Rogers as well as a note from the latter.  Children who watch the PBS program will be interested to see what the author looks like.  Small school and public libraries may not have funds to duplicate titles they already own but others who do not have all the books or have tattered copies will find that they can purchase this book for $5.00 more than the cost of one individual title so the book is a bargain.   If duplicates are needed, this book is a good choice.  Primary schools may choose to purchase a classroom set of this book to be used with emerging readers.  The price is cheaper than purchasing three individual paperbacks and provides a good value and excellent content.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Brown, Marc.  D.W.'S LOST BLANKIE.  Illus. by author.  Boston: Little, 1998.   24p.
    0-316-10914-2; hb., $13.95    0-316-11595-9; pb., $5.95    97-6944    PreS-K    E

     Now in paperback, this story is based on a teleplay by Tom Hertz.  Arthur's little sister has lost her blankie and looks in the library, car wash, and other places but doesn't find it.  Mother finally provides the precious item.  Any preschooler who has faced this crisis can identify with D. W.  Purchase for preschool and public library collections where more Arthur books are needed.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Brown, Margaret Wise.  BUNNY'S NOISY BOOK.  Illus. by Lisa McCue. New York: Hyperion, 2000.  
     32p.    0-7868-2428-X; lib.bdg., $15.49     99-19024      PreS-Gr. 2       E

     Here is a new book from a favorite author who passed away in 1952.  This manuscript was left behind and is being published for the first time.  The first impression of the illustrations is that they are reminiscent of greeting cards which is not surprising since the blurb says that the illustrator has her own line of cards.    Even the end pieces are full of bunnies.  A variety of noises are highlighted in the text so that children can participate when the book is read aloud.  Some of the noises are obvious and some are subtle and include Cock-a-doodle Doo!, bzzzzzzzz, yawn,  stretch, sneeze, and thump.  It is not clear why some noises are not highlighted such as the branch snapping, noises of the night, or the wind blowing.  Teachers can use the book to sharpen listening skills.  The illustrations are large enough for use in public library story hours.   The book can be used as a quieting or bedtime story at home.  Brown still reaches out to young readers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Bullard, Lisa. MY BODY; HEAD TO TOE.  Illus. by Brandon Reibeling.  Minneapolis:  Picture 
   Window Books, 2003. unpg. 1-4048-0043-3; $10.95 hb.    2002008651    Gr 2-4    E

    A cross between a journal and a story, Anna explains how her aunt, a doctor, has taught her about the parts of the human body.  Anna also plays doctor with her kitten, Jasmine, and relays what she has learned to the feline.  The text is simplistic, the illustrations the same.  But both are done in good taste and will appeal to the younger set.  The author offers just enough information as an introduction to the human body, yet, the facts  will paint some questions in the youngsters minds so as to open up new avenues of exploration and interest.  The book is graced at the end with suggestions for several activities about the human body as well as a glossary for the technical vocabulary.  The very last page of the book lists other books of reference of equal value as well as some web sites for the reader to explore to reinforce what is offered in MY BODY: HEAD TO TOE.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Bullard, Lisa.  VELOCES Y LENTOS, FAST AND SLOW: AN ANIMAL OPPOSITES BOOK.
         
Mankato, MN: Capstone Press, 2009. 32p.   978-1-4296-2390-2 hb.$17.95.    Gr. K- 2   E PIC

            The beautiful photographs of animals with the brightly colored backgrounds compare animals around the world.  The animals are either veloces (fast) or lentos (slow).  Fun facts highlight animal traits throughout the book.  The book is written in both English and Spanish.  It is part of a series of animal opposites books.  The book is designed to keep young children’s attention while introducing them to informational books.  Included is the FactHound site that is a safe, fun way to find Internet sites related to the book.  
         
Chris Collins, L’Anse School/Public Library Director

Clements, Andrew.  CIRCUS FAMILY DOG.  Illus by Sue Truesdell.  New York:
    Clarion Books, 2000.  32p.  0-395-78648-7; hb., $15.00  99-052657  K-Gr. 2   E

    Laughter is the best medicine; the only medicine.  But Grump finds the pill hard to swallow when a new dog, named Sparks, joins the circus.  Until now, Grump has had one, and only one, trick; but so effective was it that it kept the circus audience clamoring for more.  No more!  How can Grump compete with a canine that can jump through hoops, ride on the back of a dashing zebra, and balance a ball on his nose?  Truesdell captures the moment with her entertaining illustrations while this heart warmer emits the glow of friendship and the need for acceptance.  Life is a circus!
    Pat Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Cocca-Leffler, Maryann.  BRAVERY SOUP.  Morton Grove, IL: Whitman, 2002.
    32p.  0-8075-0870-5; hb., $15.95     2001-004167     PreS-Gr. 4     E

    Carlin, a raccoon, was afraid of everything.  So Zack the Fox took him to see Big Bear who was making Bravery Soup.  The bear sent Carlin off to get the missing ingredient but the trip was through the Forbidden Forest to Skulk Mountain where the ingredient was in a cave.  The beaver gave him armor, the skunk gave him food, the rabbit gave him a raft to cross the river, and the fox gave him a big stick to fight the monster in the cave.  When Carlin did not return, the friends went to look for him and when they found all their gifts, but no Carlin, they expected the worst.  There are three twists to the story.  The first is how Carlin managed without the gifts from his friends, the second was what he found in the cave, and the third was when he returned with the box and discovered it was empty.  These twists keep the final message from being didactic.  Besides the concept of bravery, the book can be used when studying woodland animals.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Cole, Babette.  HAIR IN FUNNY PLACES: A BOOK ABOUT PUBERTY .
    New York: Hyperion, 2000.  32p.  0-786-80590-0; HB., $15.99.    Gr. 2-5.   E

    In simple text and humorous illustrations, Cole explains the physical and emotional changes occurring in boys and girls as they undergo puberty.  The information is imparted through the voice of a bear, Ted, whose little girl asks about growing up.  The answer is given in a forthright manner, presenting basic information about breasts, hair, pimples, deepening voices, periods, mood swings, penises, semen and sexual desire.  Intercourse is omitted.  The writing style is lively and information is conveyed without fear or embarrassment.  The illustrations depict a skinny, naked teenage boy and girl.  The ending wherein the little girl reassures Ted that she will always love him is abrupt and seems forced.  The picture book format may turn off older children.  Otherwise, the book will serve as a delightful introduction for a parent to share with a young child who has begun to ask about puberty.
    Cathy Sullivan Seblonka, Youth Services Librarian, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI. 

Cole, Joanna.  MY BIG BOY POTTY.  Illus by Maxie Chambliss.  New York:
    HarperCollins, 2000.  unp.   0-688-17042-0; HB.,  $5.95    99-50286   PreS    E

    He did it!  With the help of warm and sensitive illustrations and text in the modern vernacular any little guy is going to cave in to the mundane hygienic routine and graduate into those "big boy underpants.”  Cole and Chambliss guide young boys through the challenges and rewards of potty training while there are tips for successful potty training for adults  at the conclusion of this colorful creation.  Patience and fortitude, but then----Bravo, Big Boy!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Cole, Joanna.  MY BIG GIRL POTTY.  Illus. by Maxie Chambliss.  New York:
    HarperCollins, 2000. unp.    0-688-1704-12; hb  $5.95    99-50287    PreS   E

    She did it!  Ashley pooped and peed (to use the words of the author...and the vocabulary of  today's youthful society) This small book is written in a way that after several readings will have the youngster in her pink training pants wanting to mimic the little heroine. And feel equally proud.  Although the field is already crowded, Cole's rendition on the subject of potty training is easily read, easily understood, and will be readily enjoyed by the youngster trying to conquer this hygienic milestone.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Cosby, Bill.  THE MEANEST THING TO SAY.  Illus by Varnette P. Honeywood.
    Hello Reader! Series. New York: Scholastic Cartwheel, 1997. unp.  0-590-13754-9, hb.,   
    $13.95 0-590-956167, pb., $3.99    96-32791    Gr. 1-4     ER

     When Little Bill tells his parents about his contest with the new boy at school, his father says that "Playing the Dozens" or contests to see who could say the meanest things about someone else was called "ranking" in his day.  When Big Bill counters Little Bills statements with "So," he provides his son with a weapon to disarm the bully.  Little Bill asks the new boy to join his basketball team at the satisfying ending.  The introduction, a letter by a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medial School,  gives parents ideas for helping their children solve conflicts when others pick on them.  Public libraries should purchase  this book and school library media specialists should show it to their counselors.  Both should add it to their Easy Reader collections.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Cox, Judy. RABBIT PIRATES: A TALE OF THE SPINACH MAIN.  Illus by Emily Arnold McCully. 
    San Diego:    Harcourt, 1999. unp.    0-15-201832-8; hb., $16.00.   98-17481    Gr.  K-3+

    Two retired rabbit pirates run a restaurant called the Spinach Main in the south of France. When a fox, Monsieur Reynard, comes to eat, he scares away their business.  Their method of getting rid of him without violence is ingenious.  Before reading the end, ask children to asked to provide solutions of  their own.  A glossary at the beginning of the book includes the 16 French words that appear in italics in the text.   High school or middle school French teachers can use the book to introduce  French food or Provence.  Or they can ask their students to read the book to younger children.  The theme of the book, that problems can be solved without violence, is carried out without didacticism.   McCully, a Caldecott winner,  has again provided watercolor paintings to enrich the text.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Cronin, Doreen.  GIGGLE, GIGGLE, QUACK.  Illus by Betsy Lewin. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 
    2002.  32p.  0-689-84506-5; hb., $15.00    2001-032201      PreS-Gr. 3   E

    Duck, the troublemaker from the Caldecott Honor book, CLICK, CLACK, MOO:  COWS THAT TYPE (S&S, 2000) is at it again.  This time Farmer Brown goes on vacation and leaves his brother in charge.  All Bob has to do is follow written instructions and keep his eye on Duck.  Those who have read the previous book will have no trouble anticipating what will happen even without seeing Duck sharpen his pencil.  Although this is not as clever as the first book, it is still a pleasure for children to listen to and enjoy.  This review was completed using a prepublication F & G.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Crowther, Kitty.  JACK & JIM.  Illus. by author.  New York: Hyperion, 2000.
    32p.  0-7867-2527-8; $14.95 hb 00-039724    Gr.    K-3    E

    Jack, a curious and adventuresome blackbird, thinks it might be fun to leave his forest home to seek new horizons.  He happens upon seagull, Jim, who very hospitably welcomes Jack into his seaside village.  Unfortunately the other white inhabitants of Jim's village do not react with open arms.  In spite of Jim's eagerness to go beyond Jack's differences, a web of prejudice is woven.... until the gulls realize that Jack has a skill and talent that none of them possess--the ability to read funny stories from a washed-up box of books.  The author/illustrator's ink and watercolor drawings steal the spotlight as they reveal peculiar, funky birds whose expressions reveal, a sometimes,    mean, quarrelsome and finally unbiased hearts.  Youngsters will readily agree after reading this title that Crowther really has something to crow about!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Dallas-Conte’, Juliet.  COCK-A-MOO-MOO.  Illus by Alison Bartlett.  Boston:  Little,
    2002.  32p.  0-316-60505-0; hb., $15.95   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    First published in London by Macmillan, this title introduces farm animals through a dysfunctional rooster who has forgotten how to crow.  Each double-page spread shows the rooster crowing amid various farm animals as he emulates their noises instead of his own.  For example when he is with the cows, he says “COCK-A-MOO-MOO!”  The last line on the page is “Only cows go moo.”  This pattern is repeated for ducks, pigs, and sheep.   Young children will find the incorrect noises funny and will join in the refrain.  However when a fox gets into the henhouse at night, it does not matter that the rooster says the wrong thing, the animals come running when they hear him crow and the fox runs away.  When rooster is treated like a hero, he regains his confidence and his crow.  Add this to pre-school story hour programs about farm animals.  The illustrations, large enough for group sharing, are perfectly registered on the double pages.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Daniels, Terri.  MATH MAN.  Illus by Timothy Bush.  New York: Orchard/Scholastic,
    2001.  30p.  0-439-29308-1; hb., $16.95  00-66585  PreS-Gr. 2   E 
 
    Here’s an entertaining story that tells about the importance of math in everyday life.  Mrs. Gourd takes her classroom students on a field trip to the produce department of a grocery store where they meet Garth, the produce stocker.  Garth’s superb math skills, especially in the areas of addition and multiplication, impress even the most uncooperative students.  The engaging illustrations are composed of cartoon caricatures with vivid facial expressions.  The illustrator also incorporates a checkered border into every page that carries the supermarket theme throughout the book.   Teachers could easily use this book to integrate language arts and mathematics.  It would be a welcome addition to any library that serves elementary aged children.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Davis, Katie.  WHO HOOTS?  Illus by author.  San Diego: Harcourt, 2000.  36p.
    0-15-202312-7; hb., $14.00    99-6331    PreS-Gr. 1     E

    Davis uses the same pattern and illustrations (pen and ink with bold colors) that she used in her successful picture book, WHO HOPS?  (Harcourt, 1998)  The refrain in this picture book is “Yes they do!” instead of  “No they don’t!” like in the previous book.  Children will giggle and chime in to identify creatures that hoot, buzz, squeak, roar, and quack.  Both books are good for public library preschool story hours, day care centers, and early primary classes.  These books also deserve a place in home, school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Davis, Katie.  WHO HOPS?  Illus. by the author.  San Diego: Harcourt, 1998.  36p.
    0-15-201839-5; hb., $13.00   97-37175   PreS-Gr. 3    E     PAULIN'S PICKS.

    Children will be ale to "read" this book for themselves after it has been read to them several times.  There are five questions in the book.   "Who hops?"  "Who flies?  Who slithers?"  "Who swims?" and  "Who crawls?"  After each question, readers are introduced to three creatures who obviously are associated with the verb.  Then another creature is added who obviously can't complete the action.  For example, frogs and kangaroos hop but cows do not.  After repeating the three creatures who hop, a cow is interjected.  The words "No they don't." will be repeated by the audience as they progress through the book, protesting the incorrect noun/verb combination.   This book is an exciting way to introduce the concept of sets to children.  The neon colors complement the text. This is an absolutely perfect read aloud that will be popular for public library story hours, day care centers, and emerging readers in schools.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Dyer, Sarah.  FIVE LITTLE FRIENDS.  Illus by author.  New York: Bloomsbury, 2001.     
    32p. 1-58234-751-4; hb., $15.95    2001-043906    Gr. 1-3     E

    This is a cautionary tale.  Five statues enjoy their surroundings and they each take one thing they like best (the sun, land, sky, sea, and moon) and stow them in their statues.  When the realize that the sun cann’t stay up without the others, they put them back.  The sophistication of the tale makes it suitable for older students who are studying environmental issues.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Edwards, Pamela Duncan.  CLARA CATERPILLAR.  Illus by Henry Cole. New York: HarperCollins, 
    2001.  32p.  0-06-028995-3; hb., $15.95   0-06-028996-1; lib.bdg., $15.89       K-3     E

    Instead of the alliterative S’s in Edwards’ SOME SMUG SLUG (Harper, 1996), this title has alliterative C’s.  Besides learning how cocoons turn into caterpillars, readers learn that it is better to be courageous, contented, and cute like Clara than it is to be a crimson-colored butterfly who is catty and conceited like Catisha who thinks that Clara is only a common cream-colored cabbage butterfly.  When a crow chases after the bright-colored Catisha, Clara curves down into a camellia bush where she is “camouflaged behind a curtain of cream-colored camellias.”  This diverts the attention of the crow away from Catisha.  Clever Clara had overcome the crisis and even Catisha was grateful. Place this book on the top of the purchase list.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Egan, Tim. A MILE FROM ELLINGTON STATION.   Illus by author.  Boston:
    Houghton Mifflin, 2001. unp.  0-618-00393-2; hb., $15.00    Gr. K- 3      E

    Think before you act might well be the moral of this off-beat story with off-beat animal characters.  The action takes place at Ellington Lodge, which in reality is a general store that is owned by a bear named Preston.  In between waiting on customers and restocking shelves, Preston is enjoying a winning streak at checkers; a nine-hundred and forty-three game winning streak to be exact. However, a dog from France, Marley, appears and does the chores that Preston has neglected due to his checker fixation.  It turns out that Marley can also cook, tell stories, AND win at checkers.  Marley takes on Preston and beats him.  Preston sulks, then starts a rumor about this globe trotting dog, hoping to turn the folks of Ellington Lodge against him and drive him out of town. Lighthearted chaos and confusion along with an aura of mystery create an end result that will leave the reader with the feeling that the talented little dog might just happen to be a canine wonder!  Like the text, Egan's watercolor-and-ink illustrations are offbeat and amusing, creating a perfect background for this doggy-tale!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Finchler, Judy and Kevin O’Malley.  YOU’RE A GOOD SPORT, MISS MALARKEY.     
    New York: Walker, 2002.  32p.  0-8027-8815-7 hb. $15.95    Gr. 3-5+   FIC

    This picture book is told in the first person by a boy who is part of a soccer league, YELS, Youngstown Elementary League Soccer.  After a series of unsuccessful coaches, Miss Malarkey becomes the coach even through she doesn’t know much about soccer.  None of the kids had ever played soccer either but they have a good time.  The parents come to watch but their conversations, found in balloons, will be best appreciated best by older students and adults.   While Miss Malarkey says that “Winning isn’t everything,” the principal says it isn’t everything, “it’s the only thing.”  The principal is more interested in besting the rival’s principal than the students. When the students are behind, the adults become worse sports until Miss Malarkey, who never yells, yells “Are you people crazy?”  The game is cancelled and the rules are changed.  The name of the league becomes SILENT, Soccer Instructional League, Elementary Neighborhood Teams and the parents are not allowed to yell, only clap politely.  The message of the book and the last statement are “Have Fun!”  Although not didactic, there is a clear message for young readers but mostly for adults--that children should be allowed to have fun in their sports activities and that the activities are for the children, not for the adults.  This should be required reading for all parents whose children are active in sports.  
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Fox, Mem.  WHERE IS THE GREEN SHEEP?  Illus. by Judy Horacek.  San Diego, CA:
    Harcourt, Inc., 2004.  32p.  015204907X hb.  $15.00    PreS-Gr.2    E

    This is a delightful picture book showing sheep in many poses; near, far, blue, red, in bed, on trains, and in many additional funny and droll situations.  It's a great concept book for learning prepositions.
    Linda Peterson, Retired Librarian, Carnegie Library, Ishpeming, MI

Ghione, Yvette. CANADA IN COLOURS. Illus. by Per-Henrik Gurth. Tonawanda, NY:
      Kids Can Press,  2008.  ISBN: 9781554532407 hb. $14.95.   Gr. PreS-K    E PIC

     CANADA IN COLOURS is a vibrantly illustrated book that teaches preschool  children about colors through 
examples of Canadian geography. Children of all  nationalities will enjoy the bold, brightly colored pictures, and many 
of the illustrations could easily be the Upper Peninsula (green spruce trees, white snow, blue water, etc). 
      Heather Crozier, Librarian, Munising School Public Library, Munising, MI

 Goodall, Jane.  DR. WHITE.  Illus. by Julie Litty.  New York: North-South, 1999.  36p.
    0-7358-1063-X;  hb., $15.95    0-7358-1064–8; lib.bdg., $15.88     PreS-Gr. 4     E

     Dr. Goddall is known worldwide for founding the Gombe Research Center in Tanzania where she studies chimpanzees.  This story is very different and is  based on a little white dog who was adopted by a children's hospital in London.  Dr. White is a little dog who senses which children need special attention and then he curls up next to them and licks their hand to let them know he is there.  One day the health inspector decides that the dog should not be allowed to visit the hospital.  So he stayed on the back step and never wagged his tail. The ending is believable even if it is a little pat.  The dog helps the inspector's daughter who is in the hospital.  Dogs who help people frequently appear in the newspaper.  Keep a file of these clippings and have students look for similar articles.  Dr. White is a "warm fuzzy" dog and this is a "warm fuzzy"  book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Gray, Kes.  THE GET WELL SOON BOOK. Illus. by Mary McQuillan.  Brookfield, CT:
    Millbrook, 2000. 32p. 0-7613-1922-0, hb. $14.94  00-027147   PreS-Gr. 1    E

    A spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down.....but this book might  be just
what the doctor ordered instead.  Problems, problems, problems.  If it isn't Cynthia the centipede who sprains 98 of her ankles, or Tiffany the turtle who gets her shell stepped on by an elephant, then it might be Danny the Dalmatian who breaks out into stripes.  Any child who might be stewing in a pity pot will be sure to find the humor in McQuillan's stylized illustrations that are saturated with color and create a visual impact while the short, clipped text creates a fast pace and intense interest.  Prognosis?  Recommendations?   Forget the sugar!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Greenfield, Eloise. WATER, WATER.  Illus. by Jan Spivey Gilchrist. Growing Tree Series.  New York:  
    HarperCollins,  1999.   24p.    0-694-01247-5; hb., $9.95.   99-71519   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    What a neat, simple way to introduce the concept of water to a preschooler.  In a very few words,  Greenfield describes the many facets of water and the roles it plays in our lives. While there is no real story, the simplicity of text and the soft, full-page watercolor illustrations, tell it all. A delightful introduction to one of the basics of life.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library.  Escanaba, MI

Harper, Jessica.  LIZZY’S DO’S AND DON’TS.  Illus by Lindsay Harper duPont.  New  York: 
    HarperCollins, 2002.  32p.  0-06-623860-9 hb. $15.95     PreS.- Gr. 3       E

    A girl and her mom finally come to an agreement after sharing a list of things they don’t want the other to do any more.  This third person story begins “It seemed to Lizzy, all her mother ever said was DON’T.”  The catalog of things her mother said she wasn’t supposed to do.  Each item is separated from the others and has its own illustration.  Then Lizzy lists what she doesn’t want her mother to do.  After deciding that “don’t is a tiresome thing to say!,” so they turn to things that begin with “do.”  The last page shows mother and daughter skipping away, hand in hand.  This book is fun to read but it is also good for bibliotheca, a beginning point for mothers and daughters who need to “clear the air” in their relationship.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Havill, Juanita.  JAMAICA AND THE SUBSTITUTE TEACHER. Illus. by Anne Sible O'Brien.  
    Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.  0-395-90503-6; hb., $15.00.  98-29754     PreS-Gr2    E

    In the reader's mind, it might have been a small crisis, but to Jamaica it was a majorcatastrophe.  Wanting to make a good impression on the substitute teacher, Mrs. Duval, Jamaica tries her hardest to be perfect.  But then came the spelling test.  This time something went wrongand Jamaica had to make an important decision.  In this new story about a time-tested character, Havill treats a moral dilemma with tact and sensitivity.  The text and illustrations work together to create a feeling of ethnic diversity and growing friendships.  Jamaica followers will enjoy this title along with its numerous charming predecessors.
    Patricia Fittante,  Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Hershenhorn, Esther.  THERE GOES LOWELL'S PARTY.  Illus by Jacqueline Rogers.
    New York: Holiday House, 1998.  32p.  0-8234-1313-6 hb. $15.95  PreS-Gr. 3    E

    "Low geese mean rain" If you live in the Ozarks, for sure they do.  And red skies mean rain....and leaf backs mean rain and... earthworms multiply, bones start aching, floorboard creak, dogs eat grass and cats wash up.  Old proverbs that foretell rain take the forefront in this tale of Lowell and what he is hoping about his birthday.  Lowell anxiously crosses the days off the calendar, but when the big day arrives his spirits are dampened because all signs point to precipitation.  However, Lowell trusts that his cousins will make it to the celebration despite each passing sign.  This story is a bit folksie, but full of weather folklore, happy thoughts, and trusting kinfolk.  Rogers' double-page spreads in watercolors give the story an added bonus as they translate the many proverbs that are listed at the end of the book.   This is definitely a fun read for storyhours or class visits----if it doesn't rain!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Inkpen, Mick.  KIPPER’S BIRTHDAY.   Illus by author.  San Diego:  Red Wagon/
    Harcourt, 1993.  28p.   0-15-202397-6; pb., $5.95    92-28202   PreS-Gr. 2     E

    The dog, seen on Nick Jr. on TV,  decides to throw a birthday party for himself.  He bakes a cake and sends the invitations to his friends.  When no one shows up, he eats the cake.  When his friends show up the next day, he realizes he put “tomorrow” on his invitations.  In addition to the words today and tomorrow, readers learn about telling time because the party was to have started at 12:00 but by 1:00 he ate the cherry off the top of the cake, by 2:00 he started eating the cake, and by 5:00 the cake was gone.  The book ends on a positive note when Kipper opens all of his unusual gifts and finds that when they are all put together, they make a complete and wonderful gift.  The paperback format makes this book accessible  to home and classroom markets.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Jahn-Clough, Lisa.  MY FRIEND AND I.  Illus. by the author.  Boston: Walter Lorraine/
    Houghton Mifflin, 1999.  32p.  0-395-93545-8, hb., $15.00      PreS-Gr.2     E

     A little girl is glad when a little boy moves next door because they play with their toys, sing, songs, dance and become good friends.  Then one day the boy has a new bunny which they fight over until the ears come off.  The two make up when she ingeniously attaches the ears and apologizes.   Told in the first person by the little girl, this book is child-friendly in vocabulary, illustrations, and theme.  The vocabulary is written so that it could be easily read by first and second graders even though it is not in easy reader format.  This is a good choice for day care centers or public and school library collections.  School counselors will want to have it in their office collections to stimulate discussion.  Read it aloud or have kids read it to themselves.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Jennings, Sharon.  FRANKLIN PLANTS A TREE.  Illus by Sean Jeffry, Mark Koren,    
    and Jelena Sisic.  Based on a TV episode written by Sharon Jennings.  Kids Can read with
    help series, Level. 2.  Based on characters created by Paulette Bourgeois and Brenda Clark.
    Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can, 2001.  32p.  1-55074-878-5;  lib.bdg., $14.95     K-Gr. 3      E

    On Earth Day, Franklin was given a tree to plant but he was disappointed because he thought it would be big enough to put a tire swig in it.  When Mr. Heron gave them all a sapling and on the way home, his sugar maple fell out of his wagon.  As he traced his steps he  saw his friends planting and watering their saplings and he was sorry he lost his tree so he went to Mr. Heron to see if he someone returned it. 
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan         

Jennings, Sharon.  FRANKLIN‘S BICYCLE HELMET.  Illus by Sean Jeffry, Mark Koren,
    and Jelena Sisic.  Based on a TV episode written by Sharon Jennings.  Kids Can read with
    help series, Level. 2.  Based on characters created by Paulette Bourgeois and Brenda Clark.
    Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can, 2001.  32p.  1-55074-878-5;  lib.bdg., $14.95    K-Gr. 3      E

    Topics addressed in this picture book are peer pressure, lying, and the wearing a helmet while biking.  Franklin buys a new helmet but hears his friends discussing it unfavorably.  So Franklin arrives without his bike and helmet and tells his friends his bike has a flat tire.  Meanwhile each of Franklin’s friends finish the special course, using their hand signals without a mistake to earn a shiny safety sticker.  When it is Franklin’s turn he wants to use Bear’s bike and helmet but Constable Raccoon says he can’t compete because the helmet is too big.  When Rabbit finds Franklin’s helmet he admits to ownership if Rabbit won’t make fun of it.  He is surprised when Rabbit finds it amazing.  All ends well in this story that is taken from the popular TV series.      
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Johnson, D. B.  HENRY HIKES TO FITCHBURG.  Illus by author.  Boston:  Houghton,
    2000.  32p.   0-395-96867-4; hb., $15.00.  99-35302   Gr. K-3   E     PAULIN’S PICKS

    Two bears decide to go to Fitchburg in their own way.  Henry is going to walk the 30 miles to Fitchburg while his friend is going to work to make enough money to take the train.  The progress of the two is chronicled in this picture book.  Readers can add up the money the friend needs until they reach 90 cents or they can subtract the number of miles Henry needs to travel from the 30 mile trip to learn how many miles Henry has traveled.  In the afterword, Johnson provides information about how a few sentences from Henry David Thoreau’s WALDEN inspired this picture book.  Readers of all ages will enjoy the illustrations and Thoreau’s philosophy of taking time to pick blackberries.  The colored pencil and paint illustrations offer much for readers to look at again and again.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Keller, Holly.  CECIL’S GARDEN.  Illus by author.  New York:  Greenwillow/Harper, 2002. 32p.
    0-06-029593-7; hb., $15.95.   0-06-029594-5; lib.bdg., $15.89.   2001-016029   PreS-Gr. 3    E

    Cecil and his rabbit friends, Jake and Posey, plant a garden that is big enough for only five rows.  The friends disagree about what to plant, argue, and end up planting nothing.  Then, in the manner of the folktale, “The Three Sillies,” Cecil visit s Mouse and Mole and realizes that they are being just as silly as he and the other rabbits.  The mice never take a bath because they can’t decide what toys to keep in the tub witih them so they have to give up the water to make room.  The moles don’t know what time to get up because they can’t see the clock in the dark so they stay in bed and argue about it.  Cecil gets a headache and decides “All this quarreling seems to me to be a foolish waste of time…”  Cecil goes home and finds a creative solution to their disagreement.  This is a gentle story about the fruitlessness of arguments.  The watercolor and black ink illustrations add charm to the story.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Keller, Holly.  FARFALLIINA AND MARCEL.  Illus by author.  New York: Greenwillow/Harper, 2002.  
    32p.  0-06-623932-X; hbb., $15.99    0-06-623933-8; lib.bdg., $15.89.      PreS-Gr. 2     E

    Farfallina the caterpiller met Marcel the bird when the bird accused Farfallina of eating his umbrella (a leaf).  The two became friends and they grew and grew.  One day the caterpillar “snuggled in a blanket of glossy silk” while the small bird grew into a handsome swan.  When Farfallina emerged from the cocoon as a butterfly the two looked and looked for each other.  When they did see each other, they did not recognize the other at first because of their different exteriors.  However, they soon realized that they were the same inside.  That fall the two flew south together.  The watercolor illustrations and the gentle story introduce preschoolers to change and growth in nature.   Because “Farfallina”  means “little butterfly in Italian, this book can be appreciated for that bonus.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Keller, Holly.  THAT'S MINE, HORACE.  Illus by author. New York: Greenwillow, 2000.  24p.  
    0-688-17159-1; hb., $15.95   0-688-17160-5;   lib.bdg., $15.89   99-19867   PreS-K    E

     Horace found a little truck in the schoolyard.  When no one claimed it, he put it in his pocket.  Later, when Walter found him playing with it, he recognized it and claimed it as his own.  Horace told his teacher that it was his and when he got home he told his mother than Walter gave it to him.  His conscience bothered him and he had a bad dream about the truck.  The next day he pretended he was sick.  The ending is perfect.  Walter writes Horace a note telling him that he hopes he gets well enough to come back to school and that he tells Horace that he can keep the truck until he is all better but then he has to give it back.  The story resolves itself nicely with the truck is back in the hands of the rightful owner and the boys are friends again.  This is a book to read aloud and discuss with one child or a group of children in preschools, public library story hours, primary schools, or at home.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Kidslabel.  SEEK & FIND SPOT 7 SCHOOL.  San Francisco:  Chronicle Books, 
               2006.  ISBN 10-0811853241 hb.   Gr. K-3   E PIC
               In the tradition of Jean Marzollo’s I SPY series, this book contains colorful, busy photographs of items and lists 
of items that are associated with school for readers to locate.  This book also offers readers some additional tasks, 
including two pages of each spead that are identical except for seven differences.  Each left-hand page has a riddle that is
answered on the next page.  Another challenge is for readers to find different things throughout the book.  The cover also 
includes items to look for.  Elementary school kids who enjoy the hidden picture concept will also enjoy this book.
              Amy Becker, Technical Services Librarian, Peter White Public Library

Killion, Bette.  JUST THINK!  Illus. by Linda Bronson.  New York: HarperFestival,
    2001.  24p.    0-694-01315-3; lib.bdg., $9.95.    PreS-K     510   or   E

    With appealing simplicity, Killion spotlights the concepts of fast, slow, and quiet.  Realizing that a three-year-old has a growing imagination and is able to understand abstract concepts,  she encourages the young listener to think of comparisons.  Bronson's unadorned, bold illustrations bring the concepts into focus and provide a successful introduction to conceptional thinking.   So much for that thought!
     Patricia J. Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Lears, Laurie. BECKY THE BRAVE. Illus. by Gail Piazza.  Morton Grove, IL:
    Whitman, 2001. 32p.   0-8075-0601-X; $14.95. hb.    Gr.  2-4    FIC   or    E

    This poignant story is about epilepsy and one very brave little girl who has the malady.  The author does a fine job of designing a text that is easy enough for the young reader to understand, yet holds enough information about epilepsy to help the reader relate to Becky's feelings.  Little sister, Sarah, really looks up to Becky for her bravery in facing a barking dog, attending a new school, and not being afraid of convulsive seizures.  However, Becky confides in Sarah, that although the teacher and nurse know her condition, she is indeed afraid of how her classmates will react if she should have a seizure at school.  And indeed it does happen.  The following day Becky refuses to return to school, so Sarah must face up to her own fears--walking to school alone and going into her sister's classroom to explain what happened.  Sarah must find the strength to be brave for her big sister.  Piazza's soft pastel drawings bring together the loving sibling relationship and the realization of how impacting epilepsy can be on children and their families.  A forward by the Epilepsy Foundation, not only helps explain the mysteries of the disease but offers a web site and toll free number for anyone desiring further information than what the book has to offer.  This offering is likely to grab readers pursuing personal interests and would be a useful addition to most
collections.  This is a sensitive treatment for a serious subject.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Lexau, Joan M.  DON'T BE MY VALENTINE: A CLASSROOM MYSTERY.
    Illus. by Syd Hoff.   New York: HarperCollins, 1985, 1999.  64p.  0-06-028239-8; hb; $14.95 
    0-06-023873-9 lib.bdg., $15.89    85-42621    PreS-Gr.3    ER

    Sam is bugged by Amy Lou's constant advice so he writes a mean valentine verse for her that goes to his teacher instead.  Then Sam blames his best friend, Albert, for the mix-up.   The problem is realistically solved to the satisfaction of all parties.  Because of the variety of interpersonal relationships, it can be used for discussion purposes by counselors and teachers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Mahy, Margaret. DASHING DOG! Ill. by Sarah Garland. New York: Greenwillow,
    2002. 32p. 0-06-000456-8; hb.,  $15.99     2001-0333273    PreS-Gr. 2    E

    Beauty is only skin deep.  Our daring, dashing canine hero, who is a normally "cleaned up and curlicued,” learns this quickly when Baby Betty falls off the jetty and it is up to this brave pet to save her.  Dog loves to mess with seagulls, seaweed, chase Frisbees and get into messy mischief.   The family becomes frustrated with their pup's shenanigans.  However; after rescuing Baby B., everyone agrees that "draggling and dripping-but utterly beautiful,” is the only way to be.  Garland's cheerful illustrations reinforce the lively action of the story and will leave the young reader feeling dog-gone happy.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Mallat, Kathy.  JUST DUCKY.  New York:  Walker, 2002.  32p.  0-8027-8824-6; hb.,    
    $15.95  0-8027-8825-4; lib.bdg., $16.89        2001-056841    PreS-K    E

    On a ducky day, Little Ducky looks for someone who will play with him.  Bee, Mouse, and Frog are too busy so Ducky finally plays with his own reflection in the water.  The story is slight but the illustrations, using a mixture of markers, colored pencils, oil pastels and acrylics, are engaging.  Purchase where books on self sufficiency and rejection are needed. 
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Martin, Bill, Jr.  THE TURNING OF THE YEAR.  Illus by Greg Shed. San Diego:
    Harcourt, 1999.  unp.    0-15201085-8;  hb., $15.00    96-53078     PreS-Gr      E

     Gouache illustrations bring the twelve couplets to life; there is one for each month of the year.  Although the book is not large, the illustrations fill the page so that it could be used for reading aloud to small groups of children.  The boy, girl, and the dog obviously enjoy each month which could lead adults to find out which month is the favorite one of readers and why.  Teachers will use the book to teach the months of the year and to encourage couplet writing, public librarians will want to use it for story times throughout the year, and parents will want to add it to their home picture book library.  Martin's book is especially appealing to Upper Peninsula children because they can identify with the scenes, especially  fall and winter.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Martin, Jane Reed.  NOW I WILL NEVER LEAVE THE DINNER TABLE. Illus. by Roz Chast.  
    New York:  HarperCollins, 1996. 32p.  0-06-0247+40 lib. bdg $14.95.    94-3209  Gr. K-3     E

     Patty Jane Pepper is accused by her bossy baby sister of stuffing spinach in her pocket rather than eating this undesirable vegetable. She is forced to remain at the table until she takes a bite of the stuff---and swallow it.  Rather than relent to her fate, this contrary protagonist has other plans. Like getting back at Joy in more ways than one.  The reader may not like Patty Jane Pepper and her grouchy, whiny attitude, but they may be sympathetic with her predicament.  This story, a sequel to NOW EVERYBODY WILL REALLY HATE ME, is a humorous view of sibling relationships, but it will entertain and it has to hit home with many of its readers.  The cartoon-like watercolor artwork with pen and ink details provide backup for the cynical humor.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

McCully, Emily Arnold.  MONK CAMPS OUT.  Illus. by author.  New York: Levine/Scholastic, 2000.  
    32p.   0-439-09976-5; hb.,  $15.95.   99-23237     PreS-Gr. 2        PAULIN'S PICKS

     McCully's signature watercolor mice are the characters in this heartwarming story.  With a little help from his parents, Monk makes a tent so he can camp overnight in the yard for the first time.   Monk's parents check on him and then go back into the house and read in their chairs in case he decides to come back into the house.  They fall asleep then wake up and go out to the tent to keep Monk company.  Meanwhile, monk wakes up and comes into the house by the front door while his parents go out the back door.   Monk sleeps in his Mom's warm chair until morning and his parents sleep in the tent overnight and in the morning they discover he is missing and return to the house but do not let on what they have done.  McCully conveys much of the humor through the illustrations, especially on the last page.  This picture book will strike a chord with children who are asserting their independence.   This is an essential purchase for home, preschool, school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

McKissack, Patricia.  THE HONEST-TO-GOODNESS TRUTH. Illus. by Giselle Potter.  
    New York: Atheneum, 2000.  32p. 0-689-82668-0; hb.,$16.00.  98-47070    K-Gr.3   E

    Mama was so upset when Libby lied about feeding and watering Ol’ Boss that she punished her.  This left an impression so that Libby decided “From now on, only the truth.”  So she told the hurtful truths like telling people that Thomas didn’t have lunch money and had to borrow from Miz Jackson and therefore lost friends.  When Libby told Miz Tusselbury that her prized yard looked like a jungle, the old woman went inside and slammed her door.   When Libby didn’t understand why people were angry with her for telling the truth, her mother explained that “Sometimes the truth is told at the wrong time or in the wrong wary, or for the wrong reasons.  And that can be hurtful.  But the honest-to-goodness truth is never wrong.”    The folk like quality of the illustrations is in keeping with the child centered theme and the two go hand in hand to complete an exemplary picture book.  The message comes through loudly and clearly but without didacticism.  This book clears up a “great truth” with charm, humor, and wisdom.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

McMullan, Kate and Jim.  I STINK!  New York:  Cotler/Harper, 2002.  32p. 0-06-029848-0; hb. 
    0-06-029849-9; lib.bdg., 00-054229  PreS-Gr. 3  E      PAULIN’S PICKS

    Here is a book that both delights and disgusts readers.  The main character, a garbage truck, goes about his business at night, his headlight illuminating the text of the book.  The text effectively uses a variety of sizes and font types to share the first person message.  From the end papers to the double-page spread showing a huge burp, the McMullans have created a creature that we can appreciate and despise, the same one that clangs and wakes us up in the night wherever we live in the U.S.  Because the garbage truck also eats alphabet soup, this book could also be shelved with the alphabet books.  The list of items is suitable revolting: dirty diapers, gobs and gobs of gum, kitty litter, moldy meatballs, nasty neckties, smelly sneakers, ugly underpants, and year-old yams.  The garbage truck is proud  that he stinks more than skunks but admonishes readers “but think about it--WITHOUT ME? You’re on Mount Trash-o-rama, baby.”  This text appears on two pages and the second sentence is shaped like a mountain and accompanies a garbage heap that has tall buildings sticking out of it. The visual appeal of this book which complements the text makes this book what they described in library school as a “perfect marriage between text and illustrations.”  This Caldecott contender will be extremely popular with young readers of both sexes but especially boys.  Although every school and public library regardless of size will own this book, it will never be on the shelves.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Meddaugh, Susan. MARTHA WALKS THE DOG. Illus. by the author. Boston: Houghton Mifflin,  
    1998.  32p.  0-395090494-3; hb., $15.00.     97-47172  PreS-Gr.3    E

     Fans who met the talking dog in MARTHA SPEAKS (HM, 1995) will want to read this book too.  For new readers, there is a reminder that Martha learned to speak when the alphabet soup she ate went to her brain instead of to her stomach.  Martha walks herself around the neighborhood and one day she sees a sign "Beware of Dog!" and then meets the new dog and his owner who shouts at him "Bad Dog Bob!" which reinforces his bad behavior.  Ingeniously Martha teaches a parrot to say "Good Dog" and Bob smiles and wags his tail.  Teachers can use the book to stimulate class discussion about bullies and saying unkind things about each other.  Without being didactic, Meddaugh offers readers an insight into positive reinforcement.  There is additional  humor for readers in the illustrations. One bit of humor for adults is right before Bob chases Martha;   she says "Can we talk?"   Read the "Martha"  books aloud back to back and anxiously await the next title.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Millen, C.M. THE LOW-DOWN LAUNDRY LINE BLUES. Illus. by Christine Davenier. 
    Boston: Houghton Mifflin,  1999. 32 p. 0-395-87497-1; hb.,   $15.00.    Gr. PS-Gr. 3     E

    What's your mood? Happy? Sad? Glad? Mad?  Well, if you are feeling down in the dumps and feel as down and lonely as an empty laundry line, this might be the book for you! However, it will help if you have a bouncy little sister who persists on pulling you up and out of that mood. Your outlook might change into a line full of flapping garments dancing in the breeze after reading this one. This is a unique picture poetry book all about moods and emotions. Millins, though her upbeat rhyme and rhythm, captures many of the childhood trials and tribulations while Davenier defines the rollercoaster of feelings through her powerful watercolors. A young reader could handle this one solo.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
    24 years of experience as a librarian or teacher

Morgan, Mary.  CURIOUS ROSIE.  Illus by author.  New York:  Hyperion, 2000.
     14p.  0-78680476-9;    hb., $6.99    99-20982    PreS-Gr.1     E

     Rosie is a charming rodent who “wonders who lives in the little [ant] hill” or what will happen when she blows on a dandelion.   The first of the seven things Rosie wonders about is only shown through a picture opposite the caption “about many things” and shows Rosie looking down the back of the pants of a little brother.  The book ends with Rosie and her mother looking at pictures of Rose in the family album.   The small size also makes this book attractive to people with small hands.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Morgan, Mary.  GENTLE ROSIE.  Illus by author.  New York:  Hyperion, 2000.
    14p. 0-78680474-2; hb., $6.99   98-30349   PreS-Gr.1    E

    Rosie, the charming rodent child, is gentle with her doll, caterpillars, and a total of seven items or family members.   Librarians will love Rosie when she gently turns the pages of a book.  This is the best of the three books about a preschool anthropomorphic creature with whom children can easily identify.  The warm fuzzy feeling received after reading this book is due to the text, illustrations, and the small size.  Libraries that can only afford to purchase one of these books, choose this one.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Morgan, Mary.  PATIENT ROSIE.  Illus by author.  New York:  Hyperion, 2000.
    14p. 0-78680476-9; hb., $6.99     99-20982   PreS-Gr.1    E

 This book is small in size, just right for small hands or paws.  Rosie, the preschool rodent, is patient while her mother combs her fur.  There are six other ways she is patient including waiting for the rain to stop so she can play outside.  This is the only one of the three books that identifies Rosie as a mouse in the text.  This is helpful because Rosie has the tail and ears of a mouse but her nose makes her look more like a gopher or guinea pig.   Regardless of what she is called, Rosie is charming and this book deserves a place in personal, pre and elementary schools, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Murkoff, Heidi. WHAT TO EXPECT AT PRESCHOOL. Illus. Laura Rader. What to Expect Kids series.
    New York: HarperFestival; 2001. unp.  0-694-01326-9; hb.,  7.99  E     01-1087372  PreS.  E

    Growing up is hard to do.  What preschooler is not nervous, excited and mystified about stepping out into the world--even if it is just for a few hours, a few days a week at preschool?  Angus, the Answer Dog, in his lovable manner lends a helping hand to these youngsters and parents as they take that first step into the world of education.  Murkoff presents questions that are apt to be asked by any quizzical child as to what preschool is like, what preschoolers do and what the teachers are apt to be like and how they will help make this new adventure a pleasant memorable one. The narrative is complimented with child-friendly cartoon-like illustrations that are lively and upbeat and actually steal the show. The book is prefaced with a word to parents so all in all, it's a real double-dipper.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Newman, Marjorie.  MOLE AND THE BIRD BIRD.  Illus by Patrick Benson.  New York: 
    Bloomsbury, 2002.  32p.  1-58234-784-0; hb., $16.95  2001-052988      PreS-Gr. 3      E PIC

    The ink and watercolor illustrations depict an adorable little mole.  One day Mole finds a baby bird that has fallen out of its nest so he takes it home where he and his family nurture it.  Mole loves the bird and doesn’t want to let it go until his grandfather takes him out for a walk.  When he sees the birds flying free, Mole realizes what he must do.  This is not a new theme but it is told and illustrated well.   Even if readers have not captured a wild creature they can identify with Mole’s desire to keep it and if they have had that experience they can applaud and appreciate Mole’s decision. 
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan  

Newsome, Jill and Claudio Munoz.  DREAM DANCER.  New York:  HarperCollins,  
    2001.  32p.  0-06-000932-2; hb., $15.95  0-06-001322-2; lib.bdg., $15.8    K-Gr.3   E

     This is a book about overcoming adversity.  “Lily loved to dance.”  She danced at every opportunity in many places including her dreams--until she fell and broke her leg.  The ballerina doll her grandmother gives her helps until she is able to dance again.  The biracial aspect of the book only appears only in the illustrations on the page that shows Lily at home with her parents.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Nimmo, Jenny.  ESMERALDA AND THE CHILDREN NEXT DOOR.  Illus by Paul Howard.  
    Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2000. 32p.  0-618-02902-2; hb.,  $15.00   99-28563   Gr.  K-3    E

    Big and strong does not necessarily mean that every young girl in this robust condition wants to be a Strong Woman with the circus.  Esmeralda certainly doesn't want to, to say the least.  But her parents, who themselves are circus people, think otherwise.  All Esmeralda wants is to play with the kids next door (but she is such a big girl she frightens them and they yell at her to go away).   The children don't realize that Esmeralda has a soft and gentle nature and loves to make fragile origami animals (her only friends).   Howard’s soft pastel illustrations mark the contrast between the huge, but sweet, Esmeralda and the "ordinary" kids and bring Esmeralda's feelings of rejection to life through the down-turned lines of the mouth and the anxious lines by the eyes.  The turning point comes when Esmeralda catches a falling branch just before it lands on the neighbor's baby sleeping in a carriage.  Through her heroic act of bravery, Esmeralda appears to have lost her strength and is forced to lie in bed all winter.  Grateful and guilt    ridden, the neighbor children find they miss Esmeralda, so they pay her a penitent visit and ask her to be their friend.  Do they deserve her friendship?  Let the reader decide.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Paul, Ann Whitford. HELLO TOES!  HELLO FEET!  Illus. by Nadine Bernard Westcott.
     New York:  Kroupa/DK INK,1998.  unp.   0-7894-2481-9, hb.,  $15.95    PreS- Gr. 1     E

     Westcott's whimsical watercolors add flavor to this first person rhyme about a girl who hops out of bed and devotes most of the day to her feet, socks, shoes, and activities using her feet.  Some verbs mentioned are leap, skip,  jump, rush, stamp, march, spin, stomp, and wiggle.  There is lots of action between saying good morning and good night to toes and feet. Paul's book is a good choice for preschool and primary teachers who are introducing parts of the body.  Use with Moris's SHOES, SHOES, SHOES (Morrow)  Winthrop's SHOES (Demco)  for a storytime session.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Phillips, Mildred. AND THE COW SAID MOO!  Illus.by Sonja Lamut.  New York: Greenwillow, 2000.     
    24p.   0-688-16802-7' hb., $15.95   0-688-16803-5 lib.bdg. $15.89     99-14356     PreS-Gr.1      E

     Egg tempera and oil paints were used the create the sheep, duck, dog, pig, horse, and owl, all of whom are asked by the cow why they don't say moo like she does.   All of the animals answer  the cow by sharing their own noises  and listeners have an opportunity to make the noises numerous times because they are cumulated.  The "kindergarten" humor in this book is outstanding.  The owl tells the cow that if he said Moo! and the cow said Whoooo!, then then "you'd be me and I'd be you."  The illustrations show the owl with a cow's head and the cow with an owl's head.  The following double page spread shows the cow imagining the other animals with different heads.  The cow is then happy to be herself and the other animals agree by making their own noises.  This is a good story hour selection because it offers opportunities for audience participation.  Use it with a farm theme or when  self esteem books are needed.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Pinczes, Elinor J.  INCHWORM AND A HALF.  Illus by Randall Enos.  Boston:
    Houghton Mifflin, 2001.  32p.  0-395-82849-X; hb., $15.00   96-27403  Gr. K-3.  E

    This book is about measuring in inches and fractions using an inchworm and smaller worms who are fractions of an inch.  A movement loop is made by the inchworm, a double loop is made by the half-inchworm, and three loops are made by the one-third-inch fraction to show relative size and movement.  In this example both text and illustrations share this concept.  The overall effect of the book is muddied when seven-inch celery and eight-inch ears of corn are interjected into the story even though they are not actually that size. Viewers are confused because the vegetables appear much smaller on the page than the worm who is an inch and his friend who is a half-inchworm.  Perhaps the illustrator was attempting to show perspective.  If so, the attempt was not successful.  On the back page, there is a picture of the inchworm standing next to a ruler that is next to a pear.  The inchworm is as tall as the inch but the next two inches are the same length as each other but are shorter than the first inch.   If a book’s theme is devoted to measurement, these are serious flaws.  This is unfortunate because the linocut illustrations are otherwise engaging.  Although picture books often impart information in a more interesting and subtle way than nonfiction books, readers would be better served with Koomen’s no nonsense nonfiction book, FRACTIONS:  MAKING FAIR SHARES (Captstone, 2001).
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Pinkney, Jerry.  THE UGLY DUCKLING.  Illus. by author.  New York:  Morrow, 1999.  32p.   
    ISBN 0-688-15932-X hb. $16.00   ISBN 0-688-159-338  lib.bdg, $15.93     PreS-Gr.4     E

     Jerry Pinkney transforms Hans Christian Andersen's well known tale through richly textured watercolors which surround the reader.  The slightly adapted text is based on that by Andrew Lang as found in the Orange Fairy Book.  Full page earth tone watercolors capture the natural setting of this timeless story.  Frequent side views into the pond, revealing underwater perspectives,  add a dimension of believability to this tale.  Attention to detail is everywhere.  Beginning end papers set the stage and final end papers reveal the ugly duckling's transformation.  Although this tale has been illustrated before, Pinkney's rendition surpasses previous interpretations.  This book was awarded the 2000 Caldecott Honor Medal.
    Sandra Imdieke, Professor, Northern Michigan University,  Marquette, MI
   *Editor's Note: Imdieke was a member of the 2000 Caldecott Committee, ALSC/ALA

Reiser, Lynn.  MY DOG TRUFFLE.  Illus by author.  New York:  Greenwillow/Harper,
    2001.  10p.  0-688-16875-2; hb., $9.95    98-050913  PreS-Gr.1   E

    This lift-the-flap book is told in the first person by the owner of a dog named Truffle who goes into the garden.  The pages on the left all have the same message, “What did Truffle hear? See? Smell? Taste? Feel?  On the page across from the text, Truffle is shown but he is cut into five strips.  Under each strip is the answer to the question.  This is a good book for emerging readers because of the repetition of the question as well as the picture that accompanies the answer.  For example the answer to the first question is that “Truffle heard a woodpecker.” Accompanying this sentence is a picture of a woodpecker.  The simple sentences are easy to read with the help of a picture that functions as a rebus although it is in addition to, rather than in the place of, the word.  This book can also be used by primary and ESL teachers to help students create and understand simple sentences.  It is also a must purchase for primary teachers who are teaching the senses and would make a good title to place in a classroom center with paper and pencil for students to create their own one word or sentence answers or create an entire book of their own.  Or teachers may choose to make books with a whole class, either a class book or individual books.  The strips are study enough to withstand numerous lifting.  Purchase this versatile book for preschool, home, school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Rowe, Jeannette.  WHOSE FEET?  Illus. by the author.  Boston: Little, 1998.  16p.
    0-316-75934-1; hb., $7.95.   98-75758    PreS-Gr.1    E

     Rowe illustrates this lift the flap book in oil pastels on brightly colored art paper.  The page on the left has the same two words, "Whose feet?"   On the opposite page readers see the bottom of the feet.  When they lift the top half of the page, readers see the top of the frog; on other pages they see 5 more animals. The last page shows human feet.  The bright colors are eye catching and the book is interactive.  Librarians and parents will also want to purchase other books in the series, E?WHOSE EARS? and WHOSE NOSE?   Rowe's books are sturdy enough for library circulation.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Russo, Marisabina.  THE BIG BROWN BOX.  Illus. by the author.  New York:
     Greenwillow, 2000.  0-688-17096-X; ; lib.bdg., $15.95.   99-148671   PreS-Gr. 2    E

     Sam uses the washing machine box for a playhouse which he pretends is a house, a cave, and a boat.  His little brother wants to play with him but Sam won't let Ben play with him.  Finally his parents gave Ben a smaller box so he can also pretend.  The book ends with the boys playing spaceships in their separate boxes. This book handles the age old problem of younger siblings who want to play with older siblings.  The concepts of sharing, color, and big and little are also addressed.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ryder, Joanne.  WILD BIRDS.  Illus by Susan Estelle Kwas.  New York: Harper, 2003.  32p.
    ISBN 0-06-027738-6; hb., $16.99  0-06-027739-4; lib.bdg., $17.99      PreS-Gr. 3     E

    Ryder’s trademark poetic text is significantly enhanced with Kwas’ illustrations as a variety of birds are introduced in various seasons.  When winter comes, a girl feeds chickadees, makes bird angels in the snow, and soars in her dreams.  The total package, including the end papers, celebrates birds.  There are six feathers identified on the outside back cover as well as one unidentified one.  This is an important purchase for all types of libraries. 
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Rylant, Cynthia.  THE TICKY-TACKY DOLL.  Illus by Harvey Stevenson.  San Diego:
    Harcourt, 2002.  32p.  0-15-201078-5; hb., $16.00    97-20281    PreS-Gr. 1    E

 This is a book that will make grandmothers look into their scrap boxes to select materials to make ticky-tacky dolls for their grandchildren.  The little girl loves her doll that was “made from scratch like a buttermilk biscuit.”  The doll went everywhere with her until it was time for her to go to school.  “There is no place for ticky-tacky dolls in school.  This is very sad, but it is the way of the world: When children go to school, toys are left behind.”   So the little girl went to school but she would not participate.  Only her grandmother understood and offered a logical solution.  This is a heartwarming story that also makes a great read aloud.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Sayre, April Puley.  DIG WAIT LISTEN: A DESERT TOAD'S TALE .
    Illus by Barbara Bash.  New York:  Greenwillow, 2001.  32p.  0-688-16614-8;
    hb., $15.95   0-688-16615-6; lib.bdg., $15.89   00-032111  PreS-Gr. 3   E

    Bash uses pen and ink with watercolors to illustrate this picture book about desert animals.  Sayre shares the sounds made by the animals; a scorpion crawls, skitter,scratch! or tap, tap, tap! by a gila woodpecker.  Other animals are a herd of peccaries, kangaroo rat, and rattlesnake.  After introducing the other animals, Basho focuses on the toad after it rains.  The toad lays eggs that hatch into hundreds of tiny toads.  Later, when the desert becomes dry, the toad digs deep into the earth to wait for the sound of rain again.  Since a person from the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is listed in the credits, it is assumed that this book is about deserts in the southwest.  Because this attractive book provides a unique look at deserts, it will be a welcome addition to school and public libraries where biomes are studied.  This book focuses on listening for sounds animals make and the sound of the rain that is a necessary ingredient for life in a desert.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Sayre, April Pulley. IT'S MY CITY! Illus. by Denis Roche. New York: Greenwillow Books,
    2001. hb. unpg. 0-688-16915-5; $15.95 hb.  00-044289  Kdg-gr 2    E

    To market, to market.... But how do you know which way to go when you are going from one point to another in a busy city?  A little girl insists she does not need the help of her brother, but rather she can do it all on her own.  Our bouncy, lively, pigtailed heroine explains that she has made up a song about all the sights and sounds along the way, thus creating a mapping song.  It is not a virtual map, but it's a map nonetheless.  Done in an uneven rhyme, each page shows a scene of urban life and characterizes the points of interest by their distinctive sounds.  Sayre's text takes a back seat to Roche's brightly colored cartoon illustrations, but readers will enjoy tracing the progress of the kids in the narrow spreads at the bottom of each page. It might even inspire some to create their own mapping songs.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

 Shannon, David.  DAVID GETS IN TROUBLE.  New York: Blue Sky/Scholastic, 2002.  32p  
     ISBN 0-439-050022-7; hb., $15.95  2001-043980     PreS-Gr. 2     E.     PAULIN’S PICKS

    If you liked David’s mother in the 2001 Caldecott Honor Book NO, DAVID!, or his teacher in DAVID GOES TO SCHOOL, then you will love David in DAVID GETS IN TROUBLE even more.  On the cover, David is shown sitting in “the corner,” paying for his sins.  The book is full of double-page spreads showing David’s classic excuses for his actions like “I didn’t mean to!”   The illustrations provide half of the experience.  For example, in “It slipped!” the illustrations show a glass of red juice spilled on a white carpet.  David is there with too many things in his hands and even though there is no picture of his mother nor are her words shown, readers can hear her saying “Make two trips!” or “Don’t carry so much at once.”  The funniest one of all is David sitting with a bar of soap in his mouth while the caption reads “But Dad says it!”  After a dozen excuses, David has an attack of conscience.  The cake has a hole in it the shape of his fingers, chocolate is smeared on his face and he says, “No, it wasn’t me!”  When his conscience won’t let him sleep, he confesses and says he is sorry.  The hand on his brow offers forgiveness.  The sleeping child’s angelic face has none of the characteristics of the mischievous boy found in the dozen double page spreads in the book. This is the best book yet about David in these autobiographical picture books.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Shannon, George.  TIPPY-TOE CHICK, GO!  Illus by Laura Dronzek.  New York:    
    Greenwillow/Harper, 2003.  32p.  0-06-029823-5; hb., $15.99  0-06-029824-3;    
    lib.bdg., $16.89.   2002-017509     Pre-S-Gr. 2     E

    Every reader who enjoys folk tales that feature the littlest creature saving the situation when larger creatures fail, will appreciate this story.  A mother Hen and her Big, Middle, and Little chick are on their way to get bugs in the garden when they are stopped by a big, grumpy dog.  When they all fail, Little Chick saves the day.  The message of the book is that courage, even when one is frightened, can solve problems.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Shavick, Andrea. YOU'LL GROW SOON, ALEX. Illus. by Russell Ayto.  New York:
    Walker, 2000. 32p.  0-8027-8736-3;hb.,  $15.95    Gr. K-3      E

    Alex is small.  Alex does not like being small.  Other kids are big or bigger.  Alex is not happy.  What can Alex do about being short?   Eating eggs, fish and cheese for three weeks as his mother suggests doesn't help.  Three additional weeks of running, jumping and hanging from a stretching machine do not make him grow.  Sleep, suggests his sister.  Read, suggests his teacher.  But Alex stays short and miserable.  Finally, tall Uncle Danny comes for a visit.  Being tall has some disadvantages too because Uncle Danny is always wearing a bandage on his forehead and Alex comes to self-realization and self-acceptance.  Ayto's cartoon illustrations and the simple text radiate a warmth that provide a simple lesson of life.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Shoter, Roni.  MISSING RABBIT.  Illus by Cyd Moore.  New York: Clarion, 2002.
    32p.  0-618-03432-3; hb., $15.00  2001-032569  PreS   E

    The watercolor illustrations add to the text to show a young girl who divides herself between the homes of her parents.  It is evident from the story that her parents love her very much.  However, Kara has concerns that are voiced through her stuffed rabbit?  “Where do I live?”  The dilemma is resolved when her parents tell her that when she is not with them, she is still in their hearts so Kara relays that message to her rabbit.  This book will be a comfort to young children who are shuttled between parents.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Sierra, Judy.  PRESCHOOL TO THE RESCUE.  Illus by Will Hillenbrand.  San Diego:
    Gulliver/Harcourt, 2001.  32p.  0-15-202035-7; hb., $15.00.  99-6475   PreS-K   E

      This cumulative rhyme begins “Once there was a mud puddle…” and goes on to tell about everything that was sucked into the “sleepy, creepy puddle.”  The list includes a pizza van, police car, tow truck, backhoe, and fire engine. How do they get out?  Look to the title for the answer.  Hillenbrand’s mixed media illustrations create a mud puddle creature that is just right and perfect animal rescuers.  Purchase for story hour programs in public libraries and preschools.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Simmons, Jane.  DAISY AND THE EGG.   Illus by the author. Boston: Little Brown,
    1999.  32p.    0-31679747-2 hb.,    $12.95.  98-35949  PreS-Gr K-2    E

    What a great book for any young child who is awaiting the arrival of a new sibling. Daisy the duckling is eagerly waiting for a new brother or sister. She helps Mama Duck even to the point of sitting on the egg while they wait for it to hatch. It is a story filled with anticipation that has delightful full-page watercolors that add to the flavor of the book. The text is written in extra large print and the vocabulary is controlled so early readers could master it in no time. Fans of endearing Daisy will welcomes this title with open arms. It's just ducky!
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Singer, Marilyn.  BOO HOO BOO-BOO.  Illus by Elivia Savadier. New York HarperFestival, 2002.  
    24p.  0-694-01566-0; hb., $9.95.    2001-088478     PreS-Gr. 2     BB   or    E

    There are three main characters, Lulu “Twirling in her tutu,” Andrew with his train, and Zuzu who is wearing her mother’s muumuu.  The three have one thing in common, they have fallen and hurt themselves so the refrain is the same “Oh no!  Boo hoo!, (name)’s got a boo-boo.”  There is a solution that makes them good as new in a day or two.  The illustrations provide action for the text and show the multicultural aspect of the characters.  There is internal rhyme as well as rhyme in the refrain.    Boo boos are close to the hearts of preschoolers who will enjoy the happy ending.   This book is a hybrid, a cross between a picture book and a board book.  The length is shorter, the pages are thicker than in a picture book, and the size is larger than a board book but the pages are not as thick or as spill-proof as pages in a board book.  This series provides a good transition between the two formats.  This book is one of the better ones in the series.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Sis, Peter.  BALLERINA!  Illus by author.  New York:  Greenwillow/Harper, 2001.
    32p.  0-688-17944-4; hb., $14.95.  00-035401   K-Gr.3   E      PAULIN’S PICKS

    Sis, known for his psychological picture books, has gone into the psyche of a girl who loves ballet.  Based on the book’s dedication, the inspiration was his niece.  Except for the smile on her face that is in red, Terry’s world is in black and white except for a beige picture frame that becomes a mirror when she looks into it.  As she exercises and dances, the dancer of her perception appears in color in the frame.  The only color on Terri is her costume that matches the color of the costume in the mirror.  As Terri dances, she becomes characters in four famous ballets including “Nutcracker” and “Swan Lake.” At the end of the book seven colors are introduced in the scarves she wears and the following page folds out to include all eight of the adult ballerinas as they bow for the audience.  The story and watercolor illustrations work together in concert to produce a book that is simple yet profound.  Even the end papers show Terri the child ballerina in black and white except for her red smile. This is a book for anyone who has dreams and ambitions.  The quote on the back cover by Baryshnikov is the frosting on the cake.  Look for this book in the winner’s circle of children’s book prizes this year.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director Superiorland Preview Center

Spelman, Cornelia Maude.  WHEN I CARE ABOUT OTHERS.  Illus by Kathy Parkinson. 
    Morton Grove, IL:  Whitman, 2002.  32p.   0-8075-8889-x; hb., $14.95     PreS-Gr. 3    E

    The book begins with a “Note to Parents and Teachers”  that explains why children need to understand compassion.  Told in the first person by a little bear, readers hear him say that “Others have the same feelings I have.”   He doesn’t push or tease because he doesn’t like it to happen to him.  Because of this, the little bear says “I say nice things because I’m happy when someone says nice things to me.”  The books in this series could be didactic, but because of the child friendly animal children and adults in the series and the expressions they wear, children can identify with them.  Because the situations are frequently encountered by preschoolers and primary students, they can identify with the characters in this book.  Nine ideas for parents, “Promoting Empathy,” concludes the book.   Purchase this series for preschools as well as home, school, and public libraries.   
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Spelman, Cornelia Maude.  WHEN I FEEL SAD.  Illus by Kathy Parkinson. Morton Grove, IL:  
    Whitman, 2002.  32p.     0-8075-8891-1; hb.,   $14.95     PreS-Gr. 3    E

    The first sentence in this picture book, in larger print, is “Sometimes I feel sad.”  There is a sentence on each succeeding page that explains reasons why the little girl Guinea pig feels sad.  Reasons are concerns of children: because someone wouldn’t let her play with them, because nobody listens, or because she gets hurt.  The book concludes with an upbeat message that begins with “Pretty soon I start to feel better” and ends with “When I feel sad, I know I won’t stay sad!”  There is parental support throughout the book and the illustrations are easy for the smallest child to identify with and understand. This is an excellent book for discussing feelings with children.     
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Spelman, Cornelia Maude.  WHEN I FEEL SCARED.  Illus by Kathy Parkinson. 
    Morton Grove, IL:  Whitman, 2002.  32p.  0-8075-8890-3; hb. $14.95      PreS-Gr. 3    E

    If a little bear can feel scared, maybe it is OK for a human child to be scared.  The first page shows the little bear peeking out from under a tablecloth to immediately make the reader identify with it.  On subsequent pages, the little bear shares other instances when he has been scared, by a loud noise, by a bad dream, or when his mother goes away.   On the last page the bear says “When I feel scared, I know what to do!”   In a “Note to Parents and Teachers” at the beginning of the book, adults are admonished not to minimize or deny fear in children.  Although there are lots of stories in which children or animal children are afraid, this book could introduce a story hour program in a public library.     The difference between this book and others with a similar theme is that it offers ways to combat fear like looking at a favorite book or cuddling with a person, blanket, or toy.  Purchase for preschools, primary schools, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Stevens, Janet and Susan Stevens Crummel.   MY BIG DOG .  Illustrated by J. Stevens. 
    New York: Golden, 1999.  32p.  0-307-1022-3; hb., $9.95      PreS-Gr.3      E

     This story is told in the first person by a special cat named Merl who was very possessive of her dish, sofa, chair, mouse, and bed.  Everything was purr-r-r-r-fect until a clumsy puppy moved into the house.  No matter where the cat went  in the house to get away from the puppy, it found her and licked her with it's sloppy drooly tongue.  Finally, the cat decided to take her mouse and run away from home.  She was taken in by a woman who dressed her up so she ran away again.  Eventually, the puppy found her and took her home.  Could they really become friends?   The answer is probably,  as long as the dog understands what belongs to her–all the above mentioned items with the addition of her big dog.  Sharing and friendship are the themes that come out during a good story but not overshadow it.  Stevens has some wonderful expressions on the faces of the animals who are the stars of the book; humans are only tolerated and are not even portrayed  in color.  This book is winner that deserves to be in every school and public library
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
   
Swift, Hildegarde H. THE LITTLE RED LIGHTHOUSE AND THE GREAT GRAY  BRIDGE.  
    Illus by Lynd Ward. San Diego: Harcourt, 1942, 1970.  0-15-652840-1; pb, $8.00.   PreS-Gr. 3     E

    This classic is celebrating its 60th anniversary in 2002.  During it’s heyday, the lighthouse guarded the Hudson River off Riverside Drive in New York City.  The lighthouse did it’s job well and was full of pride.  Then a bridge was built and the light on its towers made the little lighthouse redundant.  When boats crashed in the fog, the bridge told the lighthouse that it flashed ships at sea but that the little lighthouse was needed to flash signals to boats on the river.  The lighthouse was surprised to know that the bridge thought they were brothers and each had a function.  This spirit of cooperation is still relevant today.  The information on the back cover gives historical information about the lighthouse, built in 1921, was turned over to the Parks Department in 1951, and fell into disrepair until the 1980s.   The bridge is identified as the George Washington Bridge that opened in 1932.  Replace worn and tattered copies with the paperback or hardback edition of this classic.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Walsh, Ellen Stoll.  FOR PETE'S SAKE.  Illus. by the author.  San Diego: Harcourt,
     1998. unp.  0-15-200324-X.   hb.,  $15.00   97-25677   PreS-Gr. 3    E

     Pete, an alligator, thinks he is a flamingo and wants to be pink like everybody else.  The others tell him not to worry because "You probably aren't ripe yet.  It takes longer for some."  When Pete sees some green flamingos (alligators) that look like him, he discovers that "I'm different but the same," and the pink flamingos counter with "Well for Pete's sake, Pete," they said.  "You always have been."  Without being didactic, the ideas of conformity and individuality are introduced so that preschoolers and primary students can understand.  They will also see the humor in Pete's thinking he is a green flamingo.  This book can be used to introduce pink and green colors and counting two and four.   The cut paper collages complement the text.    Public and pre-school libraries will appreciate  this book and school library media specialists will want to show it to their counselors.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Walsh, Melanie.  MY BEAK, YOUR BEAK.  San Diego: Harcourt, 2002.  32p. 
    0-618-15079-X; hb., $15.00.    PreS-Gr. 1    E    PAULIN’S PICKS

    Children are introduced to Dashshunds, Dalmations, Sharks, Goldfish, Penguins, Robins, Lions, Kittens, Bush babies, and Bats.  But more importantly readers learn that although creatures are different, they have elements in common.  What a great way to accept similarities and differences in people.  The illustrations are large enough and colorful enough for them to be seen by an audience when read aloud.  This is an essential purchase.  This book can be used as a bedtime book because the only word on the last page is “goodnight!”   
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Walton, Rick.  BUNNIES ON THE GO:  GETTING FROM PLACE TO PLACE
    Illus. by Paige Miglio.  New York: HarperCollins, 2003.  32p.  0-06-029185-0;    
    $15.99      0-06-029186-9; lib.bdg., $15.89  2002-001178    PreS-Gr. 3     E

     In this rhyming picture book, a Bunny family goes on vacation.  While this is an amusing story, it is also a lesson in transportation types and a guessing game.  The name of the type of transportation appears in color before the rhyme which appears in a box against a white background.  The type of transportation appears in an illustration on the opposite page.  The last word of the rhyme does not appear on the page, but readers can often guess the correct type of transportation.  The answer is given in color before the next rhyme or nonreaders can learn the answer from the illustration.  Many of the rhymes are easy to guess:  lane/train, dragon/wagon, float/boat, strikes/bikes, stuck/truck, grab/cab, and lane/plane.  Others are more difficult like In fact her/tractor, too soon/balloon, dangerous/bus, and necessary/ferry.  Because the main characters are bunnies, this book would be a popular read-aloud at Easter time.  Children will be able to participate in providing the answers more effectively on the second reading.   
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Walton, Rick. BULLFROG POPS!  Illus. by Chris McAllister.  Layton, Utah: Gibbs Smith,
    1999.  32p.   0-8905-903-6;  hb., $15.95.  99-17216     Gr. K-4+       E

     The colorful illustrations in this picture book are in keeping with the humorous story that utilizes homonyms, idioms, or phrases that are cleverly placed at the ends of pages so that the meaning changes when the page is turned.  Some examples are "pay a visit," and  "draw up a chair."  This book is great for reading aloud for fun and for vocabulary enhancement as high as middle school.  Recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ward, Helen.  OLD SHELL, NEW SHELL: A CORAL REEF TALE.  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  
    36p.  0-7613-2708; lib. bdg., $27.25    0-7613-1635-3; hb., $17.95.  2001-045011   Gr. 3-9+    E

    What a beautiful picture book!  Most of the pages are double spreads and not one millimeter of the pictures has been lost in the gutter.  The last page of the story is a double page spread showing other choral reef creatures and it opens out to four pages.  The story line is simple: a Hermit Crab's shell is getting too small so he is searching for a new one.  Just when readers are wishing they knew the identity of the other fish, the book switches gears and becomes a key to the Great Barrier Reef off Australia.  Information about the reef precedes a small picture of each page and each sea creature is numbered. A list of the creatures; including common and scientific names, is accompanied by 2-4 lines of descriptive text.  The last page, called a "Reef alert!" lists several causes of destruction to the reef as well as four agencies that are dedicated to protecting coral reefs.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Weeks, Sarah.   LITTLE FACTORY.   Illus Byron Barton.  New York:  HarperCollins.
    1998.  unp.  0-06-0274298; hb.,    $19.95   98-221668     Book and CD   PreS-Gr.1    E  

    Bold and bright, dark and light---- That's what this book is made of! (in the full sense of the word).  Little Man owns a little factory, but in a sing-song fashion, Little Man's factory expands to become a big factory. The main problem is pollution, but the solution is simple---solar energy. This easy-read is designed for the preschooler and beginning reader, but it would be an excellent introduction for environmental pollution or solar energy. The text is minimal, but the simple, uncluttered pictures fill in what the story does not provide.  A CD-ROM  is included at the back of the book to motivate a child or a class to sing along with the Little Man and make the world a better place.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library.

Wells, Rosemary.  THE GULPS.  Illus. by Marc Brown. New York: Little Brown & Co.
     2007.  32p.  ISBN: 978316014601 hb. $16.99     PreS-Gr. 3     EASY PIC

     The Gulps are a family that loves their snacks.  They love junk food, candy and fried foods -  and it shows.  When their RV breaks down at a farm and they are unable to help with the chores because of their weight, they make a change in their eating habits.  The message of exercise and healthy eating is presented in a fun and non-judgemental way.  Children familiar with the ARTHUR series will recognize Marc Brown's illustrations.  Readers looking for a story to promote healthy eating and exercise will find this book an appropriate choice.  This story would suit a story time in classrooms and libraries. 
     Denise Engel, Director, Wakefield Public Library , Wakefield, MI


 Wells, Rosemary.  YOKO.  Illus. by author.  New York: Hyperion, 1998.  32p.
    0-7868-0395-9; hb. $14.95   0-7868-2345-3; lib.bdg. $14.89    PreS-Gr.1    E

     Yoko is an Asian-American kitten who goes to first grade where her classmates, other animals, laugh at her traditional lunch.  To solve the problem, her teacher, a fox, writes a note to parents to provide food for International Food Day.  Yoko's mother makes sushi for the entire class and readers see the other families and the dishes they provide.  The teacher wants everyone to try everything but no one touches the sushi so the teacher's plan is foiled.  However, Timothy Raccoon is still hungry and tries the sushi and Yoko shows him how to eat it with chopsticks.  The two decide to open their own restaurant at school and become friends.  The book is realistic because finicky eaters often outwit the best intentions of adults.  The book's appeal is on the universal themes of being different and the value of friendship.  This was one of my favorite books for this year.  Because the children are first graders, share it with children first grade and below even though the theme is useful to share with children up through third grade.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Willis, Jeanne. DO LITTLE MERMAIDS WET THEIR BEDS?  Illus by Penelope Jossen. 
    Morton Grove, IL:  Albert Whitman & Co., 2001. 32p.    0-8075-1668-6; hb.,  $15.95    PreS-Gr. 1     E

    Any young reader who struggles with the common problem of childhood bed
wetting, will find this title a real comfort.  Cecelia is a clever little four-year-old who is both self-sufficient and independent, but she just cannot kick the habit of nocturnal accidents.  The problem won't go away until one night Cecelia has the most wonderful dream about a little mermaid who admits that she too, has had this difficulty.  There is a bit of a problem at the end of the book sorting out reality from dream, but the
soft mixed media illustrations and the gentle rhyme all but make up for it.  No more soggy nighties for Cecelia!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Zagwyn, Deborah Turney.  APPLE BATTER. Illus. by author. Berkeley, CA:
    Tricycle, 1999. 32p. 1-883672-92-9;hb., $14.95   98-52889    K-Gr.3    E

    Perseverance is the name of this game.  Son, Delmore, practices baseball all season long while Mother, Loretta, nurtures her three apple trees--one for the past, one for the present, and one for the future while Dog just blends in with the story---"because that is his nature."  Peppered with subliminal information, this fun read with its rhythm and repetition will make it a favorite for story time or anytime. The parallels between the objectives of the mother and son are obvious, and it is a recognized conclusion that they both come to realize that hard work reaps its own reward.  Zagwyn exaggerates her figures and their expressions while she frames all of the pictures which are basically done in the cool greens and golds.  As a grand finale, the author leaves the reader with a list of baseball tips as well as the recipe for apple crumble.  An appetite-appeasing publication, to say the least.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

 Ziefert, Harriet.  CLARA ANN COOKIE.  Illus. by Emily Bolam.  New York: Houghton
    Mifflin, 1999.  unp.   0-395-92324-7 hb., $15.00.  98-36603   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    Done in tidy rhyme , this book portrays the common struggle between parent and child at that time in the morning when getting dressed takes too much time and effort, especially for Clara Ann Cookie! It is lucky for her that she has a clever and ingenious mother who uses her wit and humor to make a game out of this monotonous routine. Colorfully bold two-page illustrations capture Clara Ann's emotions to perfection. This book is attractive and children will have fun with it.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba,MI

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Death

Anya, Rudolfo.  FAROLITOS FOR ABUELO.  Illus.by Edward Gonzales. New York:  Hyperion, 
    1998.  32p.   0-7868-237-5; hb., $15.99   0-7868-2186-8 lib.bdg., $14.49     Gr. 2-7     E PIC

     Luz lives in the village of San Juan near the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in New Mexico.  She has a warm relationship with her grandfather, her Abuelo, who helps her with her homework while she helps him with his garden.  While they are fishing, some boys are playing nearby and one falls in the water.  Abuelo saves the boy but contracts pneumonia and dies.  When Christmas comes, Luz wants to do something special for Abuelo so she puts farolitos, candles in bags also called luminarias, at the cemetery and starts a tradition.  In the summer she remembers her Abuelo by working in the garden and in winter by farolitos.
     An author's note sheds light on the tradition of El Dia de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead, which is celebrated Nov. 1st and 2nd.  A glossary helps readers unfamiliar with over a dozen terms used within the text.  The transitions between the season changes is abrupt but is only a minor irritation.  The book is a great read aloud for elementary and middle school students.  Paupore read the book to her middle school students because "It told an interesting story while making reference to many Hispanic customs, as well as words from the Spanish language."  The book was a catalyst for discussing Los Pastores, El Dia de los Muertos, and farolitos.
    Vicki Leathers-Paupor; Spanish teacher, Negaunee Middle School, Negaunee High School, MI
    7  years of experience as a Spanish teacher; experience living in Mexico.

Atkins, Jeannine.  A NAME ON THE QUILT: A STORY OF REMEMBRANCE.  Illus. by Tad Hills.  
     New York: Atheneum, 1999.  32p.   0-689-81592-1; hb., $16.00.   97-42303    Gr. 2-6         E or  FIC

     Lauren, her family, and friends of her Uncle Ron gathered to make pieces of cloth from the deceased man's clothing into a quilt.  Throughout the activity Lauren is constantly reminded of her uncle.  When she goes to the refrigerator she is reminded of Uncle Ron and Michael's refrigerator "which was covered with her drawings.  Their house was the only place where she'd always been given snacks in china bowls and juice in glasses that could break."   Ron emerges as a person.  This book is a sensitive portrayal of a sensitive subject.
     Each page has  a needle and thread and a red cross stitch border that increases with every page.  The illustrations for the story are rendered in colored pencil, watercolor, acrylic, and oil paints.  Photos at the end of the book show the AIDS Memorial Quilt that has added 43,000 panels since 1987.  Web and snail mail addresses for the Names Project are given in the Author's Note at the end of the book.  A sticker on the book says that a portion of the proceeds from this book are being donated to the names project.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Barrett, Mary Brigid.  THE MAN OF THE HOUSE AT HUFFINGTON ROW: A CHRISTMAS 
    STORY.
  New York:  Harcourt Brace, 1998.   0-15-201580-9, hb. $16.00.   Gr. 1-3   E or FIC

      Losing a parent is a traumatic experience.  Even today's children can identify with Katherine Mary O'Shea and her brother Francis as they face their first Christmas without their father.  Katherine Mary Clings to her father's red scarf as if to keep him always with her.  She finds solace in the beauty of the creche at the cathedral.  As she cradles one of the angels in her arms, she is surprised by the choirmaster who is angry with her for touching the figure.  The angel falls, breaks, and the precious red scarf is lost as Katherine Mary wildly dashes from the church.  Now, Francis must find a way to restore the miracle of Christmas to his sister.  The  satisfying plot has action that draws the reader into the story.  Full page illustrations and realistic dialogue capture the feeling and hardships of everyday life in a turn-of-the-century Irish-American neighborhood.  The language is rich and lends itself to storytelling.  Recommended for any Christmas collection.
     Lynn Dragoo; Library Assistant, Spies Public Library, Menominee, MI

 Bunting, Eve. RUDI'S POND. Illus. by Ronald Himler.  New York: Clarion, 1999.
    32p.   0-395-89067-5 hb.   $15.00.    98-51338      Gr. K-3      E

     The narrator's best friend Rudi is sick and "sinking" (a term hard for a young child to understand).  Because she and the other children in school  are devastated when Rudi dies they want to create something wonderful with which to remember him.  A pond near a knobby old oak sounds like a good way in which to remember Rudi.  A hummingbird feeder that Rudi made is in this knobby old oak and one day a special hummingbird comes to visit.  Inspired by a true story this touching story will help young readers who are trying to deal with loss.  Himler's soft watercolors helps the reader feel the warmth and depth of Rudi's story.  A moving and memorable Bunting beauty.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Disalvo-Ryan, Dyanne.  A DOG LIKE JACK.  Illus. by the author.  New York:
     Holiday, 1999.  unp.  0-8234-1369-1; lib.bdg., $15.95   97-41949    Gr. K-4+    E

     Jack was already eight years old when the narrator's family adopts him from an animal shelter.  The boy grows older and starts school and the dog waits for him at 3:00.  The watercolor illustrations show how Jack and the boy play together at Halloween time and in December so those would be good times to read the book aloud to children.  To show the passing of time the next pages skip back to fall and then summer.  The next September-December, Jack does not have any energy and finally dies.  The family buries his ashes at their summer house.  In the Afterword, a social worker and counselor offers suggestions to families who lose a pet.  This book can be read to individual children after the death of a pet or human family member.  Because seasons are shown to depict the passing of time,  the book can also be read aloud when studying seasons.   Because the illustrations are large enough, it can be used for group sharing.  This is a good choice for school and public library collections.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Doray, Malika.  ONE MORE WEDNESDAY.  Illus. by author.  New York:
    Greenwillow Books, 2001. 48p.  0-06-029590-2; hb. $15.95   PreS-Gr.1   E

    Nothing was lost in the translation of this French author/illustrator's debut about life, death and eternity.  This simple but effective story about little bunny's introduction to death is truly lovely indeed.  Every Wednesday little bunny stays with his grandmother and they do all the fun things that kids and grandparents love to do together-bake cookies, walk the dog, read books, and other innovative activities.  However, one Wednesday he cannot go visit his grandmother; she has gone to the hospital.  Soon after she dies. With the help of his parents, the small, sad bunny tries to figure out what the meaning is behind his feelings.  Mama and small bunny talk about death in an extremely elementary, but soft manner.  Doray's unique style results in a touching and understandable story that will help any child who encounters death, to face the issue and be comforted by happy memories that will eventually surface. Doray is sympathetic, yet ends his book on a happy note which further enriches its effectiveness.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library

Fox, Mem.  TOUGH BORIS.   Illus. by Kathryn Brown.  San Diego:  Harcourt, 1998.  32 p.  
    0-15-201891-3;  pb., $6.00   15-289612-0; hb., $13.95    92-08015     Gr. K - 2      E

     This  delightful book will entertain and captivate any audience, but especially the young  adventuresome spirit of the younger age group.   Fox does not disappoint her readers.  The style  of this author creates another fascinating book for her book fans.  The story centers around a  little boy who meet a very tough pirate named Boris von der Borch.  Traveling with this pirate and his crew, the little boy sees how tough and scary the life of a pirate can be.  He soon comes  to realize that the pirate is very much him because a pirate has feelings too!  The pictures in this  book are very beautifully illustrated in watercolor and accent the story when no words are  necessary.  Children all over will identify with this adventure story.  It's a book that the children  will read over and over again.
    Sandi Longhini; teacher, K. I. Sawyer Elementary, Gwinn, MI

Grindley, Sally.  A FLAG FOR GRANDMA.  Illus .by Jason Cockcroft.  New York:
    DK INK, 1998.  unp.     0-7894-3490-3 hb., $15.95    PreS-Gr. 2     E

     This story is told in the first person by a boy, no older than first grade, who visits his Grandpa in a house by the sea.  Together they go to the beach where their activities remind them of Grandma.  The child puts a flag on their sand castle and says "This flag is for Grandma."  When they look up at the stars, Grandpa points to them and says "That the path Grandma took."   Whatever the viewpoint of death that the adult readers holds, this story can be used to lead into a discussion of  those personal views.  Art teachers K-12 who wish to share the concept of pointillism with students will appreciate the illustrations in this book.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Haynes, Max. GRANDMA'S GONE TO LIVE IN THE STARS. Ill. by author.
    Morton Grove, IL: Whitman, 2000.   0807530263; HB., $15.95   PreSc-Gr. 3    E PIC

    A truly unique book!  No single selection can satisfy everyone, but this simple, yet effective publication will be comforting to many children and adults as well.  The narrator is Grandma.  The opening text is sage green print on a lavender  background and Grandma says, "I was so sick.  So sick that I died. Now I feel....." Then following this, the sentence is completed in white on the same background, "wonderful"  And then it is time for her to say "goodbye".   She bids farewell to her sleeping family as well as the dog, the cat, pictures she painted, and finally to the children, before walking through her garden, rising over the town, above the earth and into the stars.  Using as few words as possible, the author creates a moving tone that can be interpreted in as many ways as there are readers.  The artwork is as simple and as effective as the text. Solid black lines outline the figures and objects in the illustrations with exception of Grandma.  She is drawn with a multi- colored line to convey an ethereal feeling.  The radiating effect helps convey not just the message of death, but the mystery and love that it carries with it. Without a doubt, a stellar selection!
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library

Napoli, Donna Jo.  FLAMINGO DREAM.  Illus by Cathie Felstead.  New York:
    0-688-16796-9;hb. $15.95  0-688-17863-4 lib.bdg. $15.89      Gr.1-4   E PIC   PAULIN’S PICKS

    Napoli, better known for her fiction for older readers, has written a poignant book about death for primary children.  This title is told in the first person by a girl who reminisces about the time she spent in Florida with her father before he died of cancer.  During their trip, both father and daughter wore shirts with pink flamingos on them.  Child readers will see a father sharing his childhood places with his child but adults will see a father coming to terms with his death by visiting in place of his childhood, sharing those places with his child to give her a sense of who he was.  Each year the father created a “Year Book” from photos and a story.  The narrator did not have a camera but collected things so the illustrations in this book are collage illustrations from a variety of items (ticket stubs, hospital bracelet) but most are child-like drawings made with crayons.  Use this book with children who have lost a parent or children who know a friend who has lost a parent, especially from cancer.  This book can be used for bibliotherapy.  It is difficult to discuss the death of a parent and this one brings it to a level of understanding and recovery` 1qs after the death.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Parker, Marjorie Blain.  JASPER’S DAY.  Illus by Janet Wilson.  Tonawanda, NY: Kids
    Can, 2002.  32p.  1-55074-957-9; hb., $15.95   C2001-903686-8    Gr. K-3     E

    Riley and his parents take a day off to celebrate Jasper’s Day.  They take their dog, in their van, go to a favorite spot near a stream, where they play with Jasper to take a nap, visit Grandma, and take pictures.  Then Dad takes Jasper to the vet to get a shot and “He won’t be asleep, though, Jasper will be dead.”   The family wraps Jasper in a blanket with some of the dog’s possessions and burries him in the backyard where they “stay there until the shadows start getting long.”  “Today was the hardest day of my life. But I’m glad we celebrated Jasper’s Day.  Because it was a good day, too.”  This difficult subject is handled with sensitivity in both text and illustration.  This is an important purchase.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Thompson, Colin and Amy Lissiat.  THE SHORT AND INCREDIBLY HAPPY LIFE OF RILEY.
      La Jolla, CA: Kane/Miller Book Publishers, 2007.  ISBN: 978-1-933605-50-0 hb. $15.95.  Gr. K-12   E PIC

      Riley, in this book, is a rat-a self-satisfied, very happy rat who is grateful for all the good things life brings his way:  
family who loves him, enough to eat (including a couple slugs now and then), and a warm bed. Riley's life is contrasted with 
humans who want so much: fast food jumbo-sized, fastest, biggest electronic gadgets. Riley is happy at home; humans 
want to go to a seaside resort or theme park. Humans who are unhappy most of the time live long lives; Riley lives happily 
only a very short time. "The answer: you just have to be happy with a lot less."  
     The book's humor will appeal to all ages and the colorful illustrations will tickle everyone as we are admonished to - 
Release your inner Riley!
      Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Warner, Sunny.  THE MOON QUILT.   Boston:  Lorraine/Houghton, 2001.
    32p.    0-0618-05583-5; hb., $15.00  00-032007   Gr 1-4   E

    An old woman dreams about her late husband, works on her quilt, and plants pumpkins and flowers.  When Halloween time comes she makes pies for neighborhood children.  During winter the plants are gone and the quilt is finished.  Her work is done.  Without using the word death, there is no doubt what has happened and readers are happy for the woman and her reunion with her husband.  This book could be comforting to families who have a religion as well as those who do not.  One jarring note is the cat, which appears from the beginning to the end of the book.  A question raised by readers could be how the cat came to be with the couple at the end of the book.  Was the cat sacrificed like animals in cultures where animals and servants were forced to accompany their owners in death?  Perhaps this is a case of having too much prior knowledge.  This title, for readers of all ages, would make a good alternative for a sympathy card, a memorial gift for a school or public library.  It is of special interest to quilting groups because of the use of quilting in the illustrations.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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Family

Ashburn, Boni. I HAD A FAVORITE DRESS. Illus. Julia Denos. New York, Abrams
            Books, 2011. 32p. ISBN
978-1419700163 hb. $16.95   Gr. K-3   E PIC

This is the best recycling book of the year!  When you grow out of a favorite dress, or any piece of clothing, is there a way to re-use it?  There is with this mother-daughter team of creativity and renewal.  With the magic words, “Snip, snip, sew, sew,” they turn an old dress into a tank top, a skirt, a scarf, a pair of socks, and a hair bow.  Julia Denos also uses her magical colors and white outlined illustrations to give a new look to a wonderful old folktale.
           
Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Ashman, Linda. BABIES ON THE GO.  Orlando, FL: Red Wagon Books, 2003. 32p.
        ISBN 973-0-15-2-5886-9 pbk. $6.95  Preschool    E Pic

        Who can resist baby animals and their moms?  This book shows how they travel until they can get around by themselves. Babies are shown in strollers, back pack and infant carriers.  Other animals cling to shoulders, backs or bellies, ride on a tail, beneath a wing or in a pouch.  No Matter how they go, babies always ride with love.
         Ann Best, Bookmobile Assistant, Menominee County Library

Bailey, Linda. STANLEY’S LITTLE SISTER. Illus. Bill Slavin.  Toronto, ON:  Kids Can Press,  2010.   32p.  ISBN: 9781554534876  hb. $17.95    Gr. K-3    E PIC

      Stanley is the dog of the house.  It is his place until the family decides he will share it with a new pet, the cat.  Stanley barks at the cat, chases the cat, eats the cat's food, and even tries to befriend the cat.  He usually ends up locked in a room by himself.  Until the moment when the
cat cuddles up with Stanley and starts to purr.  Any dog or cat owner will find this story delightful and will see their pet as Stanley or the cat.
      Christine M. Collins,  Library Director, L'Anse Area Schools

Ballard, Robin.  I USED TO BE THE BABY.  Illus by author.  New York: Greenwillow/Harper, 2002.  
    24p.  0-06-029586-4 hb. $15.95    0-06-029587-2  lib.bdg.  $16.89    PreS     E

    Told in the first person by a preschool boy with a new baby brother, this book discusses a variety of ways he can help by feeding him, giving him toys, playing games, or being quiet when he is taking a nap.  The last page shows the big brother enjoying his mother’s lap because “…sometimes I like to be the baby too.”  The illustrations are child friendly.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Bateman, Teresa. HUNTING THE DADDYOSAURUS.  Illus. by Benrei Huang.
    Morton Grove, IL: Whitman, 2002. 32p.   0-8075-1433-0 hb. $15.95     PreS-Gr. 2       E

    "Hunka-cha-hunka-cha, rooba", is the catchy chant brother and sister dinosaur spiritedly repeat as they search for their father upon his return from work.   The rhythmic verse moves cheerfully along until the final stanza, "Let's track him, attack him, and tickle him pink!" and with the serving of hot cinnamon cider it makes everything come out happily-ever-after.  Soft, shaded illustrations create the human-like characteristics in this prehistoric family and Huang's amusing details such as dino windchimes, a relic camera, and a timely license plate, heighten the appeal of the story and lead to a satisfying family adventure.  To sum it up in one word: Dino-Mite!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Bergman, Tamar.  WHERE IS?  Illus. by Rutu Modan.  Boston, MA:  Houghton Mifflin Co.,
    2002.  24p.  0-618-09539-X hb.  $15.00   PreS-Gr.1   E

    Noni is left with her grandparents while Mommy is at work.  She tries to imagine what Mommy is doing throughout the day and then hides when it's time to go home.  The story doesn't stand well on its own, but makes a good jumping off point for children to think about what their parents do during the day.  The short, simple text can be memorized by preschoolers and easily read by first graders.  The illustrations are done in rich hues of color.  The characters are not very detailed, but the background in each picture is peppered with texture.  Some of the illustrations are quite comical.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Blumenthal, Deborah.  DON'T LET THE PEAS TOUCH!  Illus. by Timothy Ering. 
               New York:  Scholastic, 2004.   ISBN 0-439-29732-X  $15.95   Gr. 1-3   E

               Sophie thinks her big sister, Annie, gets all the attention and all the breaks in her family.  She becomes fussy 
about food when Annie takes cooking lessons and practices as home.  Even with Sophie's bad attitude, Annie finds a way to win her over.  There are two additional stories in the book about the sibling rivalry between these two girls.  Families and classrooms may find these stories perfect for dealing with sisters.  The artwork is done in bright paintings with simple strokes and layers of shading.  The round heads and faces of the characters portray every emotion effectively.  Children will enjoy the illustrations as much as the story.

              
Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Boelts, Maribeth,  BIG DADDY, FROG WRESTLER.  Illus. by Benrei Huang. Morton Grove, IL:  
    Whitman, 2000. 32p.   0-8075-0717-2 lib.bdg. $14.95.    99-16677    Gr. 1-3     E

    Young book lovers will request this sports title until the final bell is sounded.  While searching in the attic, Curtis, a young frog from Iowa, discovers paraphernalia that reveals that his Big Daddy was once a famous wrestler.  Curtis is pumped up and brags to the neighborhood about his championship father.  This brings crowds of challengers to the yard, including turtles, foxes, porcupines and beavers.  Eventually Big Daddy receives an invite to go on a world wrestling tour.  Curtis must stay behind with Big Grandma. The two stay-at-homes devotedly watch Big Daddy's matches on TV but finally fly to see Big Daddy win an exciting tournament.  Despite his fame, Big Daddy finds that home is really where his heart is---tucking Curtis in bed with books, scratching his back, and checking for monsters.  The soft tones of Huang's illustrations add just the right dimension to keep the story appealing to young book champions.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Bourgeois, Paulette.  FRANKLIN SAYS I LOVE YOU.  Illus by Brenda Clark. Tonawanda, NY:  
    Kids Can, 2002.  32p.  1-55337-035-X  hb. $10.95   0-43933876-X pb. $4.50   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    Previous years Franklin made a birthday present for his mother, like a macaroni necklace, but this year he wanted to buy her something fancy.  When he realized he didn’t have enough money, he asked his friends for advice about how to “show my mother I love her without a fancy present?”  None of the ideas offered by bear, snail, beaver, and goose were satisfactory.  Franklin’s father suggested that he and his sister make her a card.  When the birthday finally arrived, Franklin made his mother a present that incorporated everything suggested by his friends.  This will not disappoint Franklin fans.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Brown, Marc.  ARTHUR’S NOSE: 25TH ANNIVERSARY Limited Edition.  Illus by author. 
    Boston:  Little, 1976, 2001.  32p.  0-316-11884-2 hb. $15.95.    00-106832   PreS-Gr. 3    E

    Besides the complete text and illustrations of the original book by the same title, there is a letter from Marc Brown to families and friends that includes “Every child needs someone who believes in him or her and offers unconditional love; “ in his case it was his Grandma Thora who appears in the series.  Brown also tells how he gets his ideas—from real life.    There is a list of fun facts about Arthur and his family accompanied by drawings for 6 years between 1976 and 2000 that show changes in Arthur’s nose from being truly aardvarkian to non-ethnic.  A great project for kids would be to compare the illustrations in the original stories.  A double page spread shows family pictures of Marc and Arthur in the third grade and various pictures of the Brown and Read families.  There is a page from the original manuscript as well as sketches and the original cover sketch accompanied by the one that was published.  A letter from Julie Cummins, Coordinator, Children’s Services, the New York Public Library (now editor of School Library Journal,) where she praises Arthur on behalf of librarians everywhere, gives several examples of how Arthur has impacted kids, and tells how Brown developed the character in response to his son’s request for a story about a “weird animal.”   Alphabetically and alliteratively, the animal became an aardvark named Arthur.  Purchase this book for teachers and librarians so they can provide background information about the famous aardvark but purchase it most of all for kids.  Even the cover is neat, it shows Arthur reading this book on the front and DW reading it upside down on the back, an example of art imitating life.   Since it is a limited edition, grab this book while it is still available.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center

Callahan, Sean.  THE BEAR HUG.  Illus. by Laura Bryant.  New York: Albert Whitman & Co., 
          2006.  ISBN 0-8075-0596-X hb. $15.95    PreS-Gr. 2     E PIC

          This charming book gives readers a glimpse of Cubby’s relationship with Grandpa Bear.  The two have lunch 
together, go fishing, look at family photos, and truly enjoy each other’s company.  The best part of their day is Grandpa’s 
bear hug before Cubby leaves for home.  It’s almost a rite of passage for Cubby to wiggle out of Grandpa’s embrace to 
show how strong he’s getting.  This is a good story for preschoolers, modeling family relationships between children and 
their grandfathers.  The illustrator, Laura Bryant, uses collage to portray bear fur and facial expressions in the characters.  The 
pictures are calm and colorful, carrying the tone of the story perfectly.
             Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

 Carl, Eric.  DOES A KANGAROO HAVE A MOTHER, TOO?   Illus. by author.  New York:  
    Harper, 2000.  32p.  0-06-028768-3 hb. $16.95   0-06-028767-5  lib.bdg. $16.89   PreS-Gr. 1     E

     When this book is read aloud, children will want to repeat the refrain, "Does a lion [and 11 other animals] have a mother, too?" The idea that humans and other animals have mother's "just like me and you" is a universal theme that has been overused.  However, Carle has added a fresh viewpoint to this animal recognition book which is pleasing from endpaper to endpaper.  In typical Carle style, the bright collages of the animal mother and babies are appealing.  At the end of the book there is a list of the dozen animals and the names for babies, parents, and groups.  Fans of Carle will purchase this book and all home, preschool, school, and public libraries will have it on their purchase orders.  Don't miss it.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Carlson, Nancy.  HOORAY FOR GRANDPARENTS’ DAY!  Illus by author.  New
     York: Viking Penguin, 2000.  32p.  ISBN 0670888761 hb. $15.99   K-3    

     Everyone at the Lassie Lower School is getting ready for Grandparents’ Day, except for a cat named Arnie.  The librarian learns that Arne doesn’t have a grandparent to bring and suggests he bring a grown-up.  When he gets to his neighbor’s house, he learns that they will be gone for two weeks.  On his way to deliver their hand-made invitation, he tells his story to everyone he sees to explain why he can’t stop and talk.  When Grandparents Day comes, Arnie has a big surprise that turns a disaster of a day into one that warms his heart.  Grandparents’ Day is celebrated the first Sunday after Labor Day.
      Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Carr, Jan.  SWEET HEARTS.  Illus by Dorothy Donohue.  New York: Holiday, 2002.
    0-8234-1732-8 hb. $16.95   2001-059404   PreS-Gr. 2   E

    The book begins with a page about how Valentine’s Day got started and ends with directions for making hearts.  The collage illustrations show this panda family and the valentines they make and give to each other.  The story, told in rhyme, is simple but profound--the child is their “sweetest heart.”  This will enhance any holiday collection, but could be enjoyed year round.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Clarke, Jane. THE BEST OF BOTH NESTS. Illus. by Anne Kennedy.  Morton Grove,
          IL: Albert Whitman & Co., 2007. 30p.  978-0-8075-0668-4    Gr. PreS-2    E PIC

          This is the story of a baby stork whose parents are always fighting and then move into separate nests.  It also reveals how the baby stork feels about the family splitting up.  Baby stork is lucky enough to find a friend who also has two nests and learns a different perspective on family.  This book is an attempt to help young children cope with separation of parents and impending divorce.  The author projects human feelings onto the stork to soften the serious nature of the topic. Teachers and parents may find this book useful in the classroom, in the home, or at the counselor’s office.
          Melissa Coyne, Substitute Teacher, Tahquamenon Area Library, Newbery, MI

DiSalvo, DyAnne.  SPAGHETTI PARK.  New York:  Illus by author.  Holiday, 2002.
    32p.  0-8234-1682-8 hb. $16.95.  2001-04060-5    Gr. 1-4+    E

     Told in the first person by a boy whose Grandpa takes him to the park, this intergenerational story is also about a neighborhood park that disintegrates because of teenage vandals.  The old-timers fix it up and paint the benches, but vandals destroy it again.  They even destroy the bocce ball court.  Finally one of the boys who was taught the game by his grandfather, confronts one of his friends who is responsible for the vandalism.  The last page contains basic rules of Bocce.  This book can spark lively discussion.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Falconer, Ian.  OLIVIA.  Illus by author.  New York:  Atheneum, 2000.  40p.
    0-689-82953-1 hb.  $16.00   99-24003    PreS-Gr.3     E     PAULIN’S PICKS.

    The understated text, enhanced by the charcoal and gouache illustrations, works together to make this a memorable picture book.  The only splash of color in the book is red, which accents the shades of charcoal.   The illustrations significantly add to the text.  When Olivia is at the beach, “She feels it is important to be prepared.”  The illustrations show her in a red bathing suit with flotation bands on her arms, earplugs, flippers, and goggles.  Oliva has a younger brother and “Sometimes Ian just wouldn’t leave her alone, so Olivia has to be firm.”  The illustration shows Olivia wearing a scary paper bag mask over her head.
    The book begins “She is very good at wearing people out.”  Although Olivia is a piglet, she is reminiscent of the human child in Mem Fox’s book, HARRIET, YOU’LL DRIVE ME WILD. (Harcourt, 2000)    Both books end with the mothers loving their children anyway, which is reassuring to readers.   Although the theme is familiar, Falconer, a master of understatement, has provided readers with a new and fresh approach.  This is an essential purchase for even the smallest school and public library and was my favorite picture book for 2000.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center  *This book is a 2001 Caldecott Honor Book.

Fox, Mem.  HARRIET, YOU’LL DRIVE ME WILD!  Illus. by Marla Frazee.  San Diego:
    Harcourt, 2000.  32p.  0-15-201977-4 hb.  $16.00   98-11697  PreS-K     E

    This is a story of unconditional love.  The opening page sums up this little girl:   “Harriet Harris was a pesky child.  She didn’t mean to be.  She just was.”   No matter what mischief Harriet gets up to, her mother repeats the refrain, “Harriet, my darling child.  Harriet, you’ll drive me wild.  Harriet, sweetheart, what are we to do?”  Harriet always replies:  “I’m sorry,” said Harriet, and she was.”  The last straw comes when Harriet, with the help of her dog, rips apart a feather pillow.  Mother yells and yells; then the two laugh together.  This is a good book for libraries, for family giving, or for parenting classes.  Fox, an educator from Australia, has the ability to take universal themes and translate them into picture books that touch both adults and children.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Garland, Michael,  ICARUS SWINEBUCKLE. Illus by author. New York:
    Whitman, 2000.  32p.  0-8075-3495-1 hb. $15.95    99-16880    K-Gr. 3    E

    Inspired by an old myth, Garland transports Icarus to eighteenth-century London where he becomes Icarus Swinebuckle...a portly pig who has a big dream. He wants to fly.  He constructs wings with his only supporter being his little son.  The whole town turns out to watch as Icarus Swinbuckle, who believes in his dreams, sets his sights on the sun.  He soars to the clouds....only to eventually fall into a river.   Icarus' spirits resist dampening and his gentle determination will win readers over.  Garland designs elaborate illustrations with detailed scenes.  The farm animals in period costumes provide a comical ingredient as does the revelation of Icarus' next experimental goal......the moon!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Goss, Mini.  WHEN MUM WAS LITTLE.  LaJolla, CA:  Kane/Miller Book Publishers, Inc., 2004.  
          First published by Black Dog Books, Australia, 2001.  32p.  1-929132-64-6  $15.95    Gr.K-4    E

            Wow!  These illustrations are as bright as the psychedelic 1960's were with colors and patterns everywhere!  Goss makes very interesting hair on her subjects - it's eye-catching.  She captures the fashions and home décor of this era wonderfully.  The story is also humorous and informational.  The most intriguing concept is that Mum was the same age in the story as her children are now.  What a great way to introduce a unit on family or modern history.  Any library would be happy to receive this book.
           
Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI 

 Greene, Rhonda Gowler. DADDY IS A COZY HUG. Illus.by Maggie Smith. New York:
         Walker & Co., 2010.  30p.  ISBN: 978-0-8027-9728-5 hb. $14.99.  Gr. K-3  PIC

            Everyday throughout the year, Daddy finds something fun to do-swimming, camping, playing in the snow, etc. The book ends with a hug at bedtime and an "I love Daddy!"The author has written over 20 books for children. This book is written in one and two syllable words, and uses literary technques such as alliteration, oonomatopoeia,and end rhyme. Colorful illustrations make it fun to read.
            Joyce Hoskins, Teacher- L'Anse School Public Library

Gregory, Valiska.  SHIRLEY’S WONDERFUL BABY.  Illus by Bruce Degen.  New  York: 
    HarperCollins, 2002.  32p.  ISBN 0-06-028132-4 hb. $14.99    PreS-Gr. 1     E

    This is a book for any child whose “nose is out of joint” because of a new baby in the house.  There is no doubt from the expression on Shirley’s face that she is unhappy.  The book begins “The trouble with Shirley’s new baby brother was that everything Stanley did was wonderful.”  Shirley wonders “How can a baby who looks like a prune be wonderful?”  Shirley even asks if it is time to take the baby back.  Then one day, Mrs. Mump came to baby sit.  Shirley decided she liked Mrs. Mump when the older woman said she didn’t like babies.  The two read books, did puzzles and had other fun together.  When her brother’s lip quivered when he saw the baby sitter, Mrs. Mump asked for Shirley’s help.  The clever Mrs. Mump asked for help in changing, feeding, burping, and singing a song to Stanley.  Shirley not only had to do the tasks, but she also had to defend her brother from the babysitter’s remarks.  When the parents returned, Mrs. Mump praised Shirley as a wonderful sister.  Shirley and her brother appear on the end papers in their “before” mode.  Because the family consists of hippos, the lesson is easier to take.  This is a fresh approach to an old problem.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Haley, Amanda.  IT'S A BABY'S WORLD.  Illus by author.  Boston:  Little, 2001.
    24p.  0-316-34596-2 lib.bdg. $12.95.  99-057102    PreS-Gr.   2    E

    Watercolors show the life of a smiling baby  from morning to night  with various activities like play time, nap time, meal times, family time, and bath time.  The double spreads for the eleven "times" are divided into numerous subtopics.  Although there is no story line, this catalog of activities and accompanying props is sufficient.   Purchase for public libraries or baby showers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Henkes, Kevin. GRANDPA & BO.  Illus by author.   New York: Greenwillow Books, 2002.
    32p.   0-06-6238374 hb. $14.95  0-06-6238382 lib.bdg. $14.89    K-Gr. 3    E

    A picture book that will make a visual impression that will not soon be forgotten is the best way to describe this Henkes title that was first published back in the mid '80's.  The soft, gentle framed pencil drawings done on a creamy paper, suggest the intimacy shared by Bo and his grandfather who spend the summer and alternating Christmases together.  They talk, they laugh, they play ball.  They take long walks, they fish, and they talk some more.  When Bo and Grandfather both see a shooting start at the conclusion of the story there should be no question in the mind of the reader that both of their wishes would be the same.  This gem leaves the reader wishing they could catch a falling star and put it in their pocket!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Henry, Steve. NOBODY ASKED ME!  Illus by author. New York: HarperCollins, 2001. 32p. 
    0-688-17865-0 hb. $14.95   0-688-17866-9 lib.bdg. $14.89    PreS-Gr.1    E

    One-liners; the entire text is created with single words or one-liners which are perfect for a beginning reader or anyone dealing with the timeless subject of adjusting to a new baby.  Bo is "an only cat.”  Bo has a perfect life.  Bo sleeps, eats, plays, sleeps, eats, plays.  But then.... one day a little brother appears on the scene.  End of perfect life! However, it doesn't take long for Bo to discover life really is more fun, if not perfect, when two play the game of hide-and-seek, share a food dish, or toss socks.  Henry's entertaining illustrations are done in an exaggerated style, and in brilliant colors that add to the excitement, fun, and frolic.  In the eyes of the young reader or lapsitter, this title would be considered the cat's meow!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Hershenhorn, Esther.  THERE GOES LOWELL'S PARTY.  Illus by Jacqueline Rogers.  
    New York: Holiday House, 1998.  32p. 0-8234-1313-6  hb. $15.95   PreS-Gr. 3    E

    "Low geese mean rain" If you live in the Ozarks, for sure they do.  And red skies mean rain....and leaf backs mean rain and... earthworms multiply, bones start aching, floorboard creak, dogs eat grass and cats wash up.  Old proverbs that foretell rain take the forefront in this tale of Lowell and what he is hoping about his birthday.  Lowell anxiously crosses the days off the calendar, but when the big day arrives his spirits are dampened because all signs point to precipitation.  However, Lowell trusts that his cousins will make it to the celebration despite each passing sign.  This story is a bit folksie, but full of weather folklore, happy thoughts, and trusting kinfolk.  Rogers' double-page spreads in watercolors give the story an added bonus as they translate the many proverbs that are listed at the end of the book.   This is definitely a fun read for storyhours or class visits----if it doesn't rain!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Hiatt, Fred.  BABY TALK.  Illus. by Mark Graham.  New York: McElderry/S&S,
     1999.  32p.  0-689-82146-8 hb.  $14.00   97-50550    PreS-Gr.2     E  or  FIC

     A small boy is not thrilled with the new baby and family members tell Joey that the baby is saying that he is hungry, needs to be changed, or wants a nap.  Then Joey's grandmother tells him that the baby is learning to talk baby talk just like Joey did at that age.  The bonding takes place when Joey talks baby talk to the baby brother and then translates for his family.  Public libraries have books about siblings but should make room for this one because it is nicely done.  It would also make an excellent baby gift for a preschool boy who has a new brother    .
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Jennings, Sharon.  FRANKLIN’S CANOE TRIP.  Illus by Sean Jeffry, Mark Koren, and
    Jelena Sisic.  Based on a TV episode written by Sharon Jennings.  Kids Can Read with
    Help series, Level. 2.  Based on characters created by Paulette Bourgeois and Brenda Clark.
    Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can, 2001.  32p.  1-55074-878-5 lib.bdg. $14.95     K-Gr. 3      E

    Franklin and his friend Bear and their fathers take off on a canoe trip.  The fathers warn the boys that it will be hard work.  The first disaster happens when the boys jump into the canoe and tip it over.  After looking at a map the fathers decide to portage and the boys learn firsthand the difficulty of this.  When they arrive at their camping area, they decide it is crowded so they locate a deserted one.  Throughout the book the boys learn to be like real explorers and appreciate the quiet wilderness without lots of other tourists and motor boats.  Although this book does not have as strong a message as some others in the series, it will appeal to fans of the TV series from which this story is taken.   
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Kinsey-Warnock, Natalie.  FROM DAWN TILL DUSK.  Illus. by Mary Azarian.  Boston: 
    Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002.  unp.  0-618-18655-7    $16.00    Gr. K-5     E      
       
    The author reminiscences about experiences she shared with her family throughout the four seasons on their farm in Vermont.  The woodcut illustrations add realism to the story.  The author and illustrator share family photos of life on the farm on the last pages of the book.  Parents and teachers who want to expose their children to childhood enjoyments before the technological age will want to purchase this book as well as those who are interested in farm life.
    Jolene Hetherington, Teacher, Munising Public Schools, 12 years of teaching experience

Larsen, Andrew, THE IMAGINARY GARDEN. Illus.by Irene Luxbacher. Tonawanda, NY: 
            Kids Can Press, 2008.  ISBN 978-1-5543-279-7 hb. $16.95     PreS-K    E Pic.

            When Teo’s grandfather, Poppa, moves from a house to an apartment, he leaves behind their favorite place.  Their wonderfully colorful garden space is now an empty, small balcony.  Theo comes up with a delightful plan to bring some cheer to the new apartment.  They get out the paintbushes and begin to fill a huge canvas with an imaginary garden.  Together, Theo and Poppa turn a disappointing situation into a new challenge.
           
Heidi Bretall, Elementary School ParaPro, Bessemer Public Library  

Mason, Margaret. THESE HANDS. Illus. Floyd Cooper. New York: Houghton Mifflin,
            2011.  32p. ISBN 978-0547215662 hb. $16.99    Gr. 2-4    E PIC

Joseph’s Grandpa begins each page with, “Look at these hands, Joseph,” and proceeds to list the amazing things he can do with his hands.  He tells Joseph about when his dark skinned hands were not allowed to make bread for light skinned people, how his hands were a part of the Civil Rights Movement, and how his work fifty years ago made it possible for Joseph to do anything he wants to today.  Don’t miss the historical information in the back of the book.  Mason’s beautiful words are illustrated by Floyd Cooper in an oil wash that give each page a dreamlike quality, reminding readers of life’s possibilities.
           
Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

McPhail, David.  SISTERS.  Illus by author.  San Diego: Hardcourt, 1984, 2003.  32p. 
    0-15-204659-3; hb., 9.95     2002-003755     PreS-Gr. 3     E

    First published in 1984, this picture book about sisters is a favorite.  The first half of the book is devoted to differences and the last half focuses on similarities.  The last sentence is “Because, you see, they loved each other so very much.”   This is an intensely personal book that can be recommended by librarians to patrons for reading or personal giving.  The pen and ink and watercolor illustrations complement the text and add to the personal nature of the concept.   Libraries that don’t already have this book need to purchase it.  
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Meddaugh, Susan.  MARTHA SAYS IT WITH FLOWERS.  New York: Houghton Mifflin
      Harcourt, 2010.  24p.  ISBN 978-0-547-21058-2 hb. $12.99   Gr. K-1   PIC

      Martha has decided that getting Grandma Lucille a perfect birthday present will gain her the approval she wants from the usually disapproving Grandma. Although Martha tries to please her, she invariably says or does something to garner her disapproval. Her latest faux pas was ruining Grandma’s favorite flower festooned hat; eager to fetch it, she presents her with a crumpled hat covered with bite marks and drool! Unfortunately, some of Martha’s ideas of a great gift  are a 100th birthday card complete with a muddy paw signature and a slightly wormy apple. Finally Martha is inspired by the memory of the flowers on Grandma’s hat. She picks a beautiful basket of fresh flowers as her gift. On the day of the party Martha retrieves her gift only to find that the flowers are no longer fresh, but brown and wilted. A sweet happy ending brings the message that not only is it the thought that counts, but a little luck helps, too.            
      
Barb Ward, Retired children’s Librarian, Dickinson County Library

Melmed, Laura Krauss.  A HUG GOES AROUND.  Illus by Betsy Lewin.  New York:   
      HarperCollins, 2002.  32p.  0-688-14680-5; hb., $15.95.  00-063194   PreS-Gr. 3   E

    This rhyming picture book begins “A mountain goes up.  A valley goes down.  Where does a hug go?  A hug goes around.”  The last sentence is repeated throughout the book, showing many ways there are enough hugs to go around in a family.  At the end of the day, the children are hugged and tucked into bed and the parents look at the moon and share a different type of hug.  The black line and watercolor illustrations express the love and joy in this family.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Minarik, Else Holmelund. FATHER‘S FLYING FLAPJACKS. Illus.by  David T. Wenzel. Little Bear series. 
    New York: HarperFestival, 2002.  14p.   0-694-01687-X; bd. Bk., $5.99   PreS    BB

    Little Bear and Father Bear make flapjacks to surprise Mother Bear.  Flour flies all over, an egg is dropped on the floor, and a flapjack is flipped on the floor.  Mother is surprised and pleased.  There isn’t much to the story but mothers might appreciate reading this in May for Mother’s Day.  The disappointing news is that illustrations are Sendak-like but are not quite the same as the original pictures of Little Bear.  This story is not as good as some of the stories in the easy readers about Little Bear so these copycat stories in board book format are not as exciting as the original stories.  Without Sendak’s illustrations, these books are like a cheeseburger without the cheese.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Moore, Liz.  ZIZI AND TISH.  Illus. by Liz Milkau.  Custer, WA:  Orca Book Publishers,
    2003.  30 p. 1-55143-254-4; pbk, $7.95  K-3.

    This is the story of two sisters and a summer at the lakefront cottage.  Tish is twelve years old and Zizi is about six.  The two girls are having fun together playing in the water and woods, picking berries, etc. until another 12 year old girl, Kimber, comes and monopolizes Tish.  Zizi feels left out as the two 12 year olds engage in activities that do not include Zizi and they laugh at Zizi's fears of deep water, and top bunks.  One night a big thunderstorm comes and Zizi is awfully scared, but her big sister comes through with comfort and companionship just when it is needed most.  The water-colored ink illustrations not only capture the woods and lake, but also the detailed expressions and moods of the girls.  This book shows a child dealing with the emotions that go with being afraid and of feeling inadequate and, above all, of being left out.  Growing up can be emotionally painful and recognizing success one step at a time is wonderful.  This is an excellent well-illustrated story.
    Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Library Board of Directors

Murkoff, Heidi. WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU USE THE POTTY.  Illus by Laura  Rader.  
    New York: HarperCollins, 2000.  32p.   0-694-01322-6; hb., $7.99      99-69942      PreS     E

    Growing up is hard to do--lots of milestones but also lots of little rocks in the road.  One of the largest milestones on the long road of development is potty training.   Murkoff provides straightforward and reassuring answers to the many questions that arise about the process of toilet training.  She puts the questions in a simple language with honest answers that will explain the process naturally and pleasingly.   An introduction invites the parents to adapt their own language for the terms provided, but recommends child-friendly terms over more clinical language.  Rader illustrates with bright fun pictures that are filled with compelling details to the young mind.  This title will lend a helping hand and cause parents to realize that potty training time doesn't necessarily mean it is time for them to sit on the pitty pot.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Parr, Todd.  THE DADDY BOOK.  Illus by author.  New York:  Little, Brown,
    2002.   32p.  0-316-60799-1; hb., $14.95  2001-029097  PreS-Gr. 2  E

    Dedicated to his own and different types of daddies, Parr shares differences on each double-page spread in humorous ways.  “Some daddies wear suits”  is opposite the page showing “Some daddies wear two different socks.”  The childlike drawings in bold colors against equally bold colored backgrounds are similar to those found in Parr’s previous books including the very popular IT’S OK TO BE DIFFERENT (Little, 2001).  Even before seeing the sticker, “Free Greeting Card Inside,” I thought it would make a good Father’s Day present for years to come.  All libraries large or small, school or public, need this book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Peacock, Carol Antoinette. MOMMY FAR, MOMMY NEAR.  Illus. by Shawn Costello Brownell.  
    Morton Grove, IL: Whitman, 2000. 32p.  0?8075?5234?8; lib.bdg.,  $13.45    PreS-Gr. 3     E

    Based on inspiration from true life, this is an adoption story--the story of a girl named, Elizabeth.  She knows that she is from China.  She knows she looks different from her American mom and dad and through the course of the story, she comes to realize and understand that she is adopted and what adoption means.  Elizabeth is taught that she has another mother in far away China; a mother she might never meet and know, but is assured that she is well?loved by both   her American parents and her mother in China.  The book is very descriptive.  It deals with feelings children may not totally understand, but learn to deal with.  It is expressive in that it deals with love and acceptance.  The soft beautiful oil paintings compliment the text and the only negative aspect of the book might be that the text is printed over the illustrations on some of the pages and often difficult to read.
    Charlotte Oshe; Children’s Assistant, Library Assistant, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Postgate, Daniel  THE SNAGGLE GROLLOP. Illus by Nick Price.  Frome, Somerset, England;   
         Scholastic, Inc., 2009.  32p. ISBN 978-0-545-10470-8 hb. $16.99   Pres.-Gr. 1   E PIC

        Sam asks his mom and dad for a dog, then a cat.  Predictably, the answer is, ”No.”  Dad would have to walk the dog all the time; mom doesn’t want hair all over the furniture.   When Sam asks for a made=up pet, a snagglegrollop, his parents laugh and agree, confident that no such creature exists.  Of course Sam brings snagglegrollop home and his hapless parents reluctantly agree, after all they’ve already given their permission.  although Sam’s new pet is a huge green, silly looking creature who eats a lot, he endears himself to the family with hilarious jokes, dancing and by taking the family on  “fabulous” adventures.  After the unexpected pet becomes lonely, meets a quibblesnuff, and flies off into the sunset, Sam once again requests a dog.  This time the answer is a smiling, “We’ll see,” leaving reader and listener to draw their own conclusion, helped by a dog happily panting with his head in the fence gate.  the story has been done before, but youngsters will enjoy it.
        Barb Ward, Retired children’s Librarian, Dickinson county Library

Rosen, Michael.  HANKSGIVING WISH. Illus.by John Thompson. New York: Blue Sky/Scholastic,
    1999.  32p.    0-590-25563-0; hb., $16.95.   97-42208    Gr. K-5+     E or FIC     PAULIN'S PICKS.

    Amanda's family always spent Thanksgiving with her cousins at her Grandmother Bubbe's house and Grandmother spent the whole month preparing that meal.  She even made the dressing from her own braided challah and the gelatin molds had ten different layers.  But Amanda's favorite part was pulling on the wishbones with her grandmother who had saved them all year for her grandchildren.  The first Thanksgiving without grandmother was held at Amanda's "new" old house.  When the cousins and their families came, the meal was not finished but everyone pitched in until the overload on all the appliances blew fuses.  Mrs. Yee, a neighbor came over and offered her kitchen and the kitchen of another neighbor who was out of town.  When the meal was over, Amanda cried because she missed her grandmother and her collection of wishbones.  Because she was the youngest cousin, the family decided that she and Mrs. Yee, who was also a grandmother, should pull that day's wishbone.  Amanda finally learned what her grandmother wished for every year.  This heartwarming story could be read aloud after a family Thanksgiving meal, at a public library story hour, or in a classroom.  Highly recommended for libraries of all types.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Ruelle, Karen Gray.  MOTHER’S DAY MESS.  A Harry and Emily Adventure series,  Level. 2. 
    New York: Holiday, 2003.  32p.  0-8234-1773-5 hb. $14.95     Gr. 1-2      ER

    There are four chapters in this easy reader about a brother and sister kitten who are planning to give their mother a Mother’s Day present.  When they ask their mother what present she gave her own mother, she replied “She said I was her favorite Mother’s Day present.”   The kittens think this is a silly gift so they plant some flower seeds, make pancakes with a card showing a mother cat enjoying breakfast in bed..  The gifts sound good but Emily forgets to water her plant, the pancakes have unusual ingredients, and Emily jumps on the bed and upsets the breakfast.  Mother is a good sport and says that she loves that they planned and worked on the presents “But most of all, I love that you wanted to make me happy.  And I love both of you!  You are my favorite Mother’s Day present.”   Then Father Cat takes them out for breakfast. 
    By spring, some first graders will be able to read this board book for themselves. The story is amusing and heartwarming and will make a wonderful addition to school and public library collections. The only problem posed by this book is whether to place it in the easy reader or the holiday section.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Ruelle, Karen Gray.  SNOW VALENTINES.  Holiday House Readers, New York: Holiday, 2000.  
    32p.  0-8234-1533-3; hb., $14.95    99-46315    Gr. 1-2   ER    PAULIN’S PICKS

     It is difficult to write an easy reader that sustains the story while making it fascinating for emerging readers.  Ruelle does so admirably using sufficient repetition in four chapters about a cat named Harry and his sister, Emily.  The kittens get hugs from their mother and drawings from their father for special occasions and know this will be true for Valentine’s Day also.  The cat kids want to do something special for Valentine’s Day but after unfavorable feedback from their parents, they discard paper hearts, a dance, a song, a dessert, and finally settle on the newly fallen snow to help them express their love for their parents.  This is a humorous and tender story that is totally believable.    Although this title is a holiday and winter book, it can be read all year long because love and family don’t have boundaries dictated by the calendar.  Consider shelving it with the easy readers rather than with the holiday books, especially in snowy climates.  Even if your easy reader budget is limited, make sure that this is one of your selections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Rylant, Cynthia.  THE TICKY-TACKY DOLL.  Illus by Harvey Stevenson.  San Diego:
    Harcourt, 2002.  32p.  0-15-201078-5; hb., $16.00    97-20281    PreS-Gr. 1    E

    This book will make grandmothers look into their scrap boxes to select materials to make ticky-tacky dolls for their grandchildren.  The little girl loves her doll that was “made from scratch like a buttermilk biscuit.”  The doll went everywhere with her until it was time for her to go to school.  “There is no place for ticky-tacky dolls in school.  This is very sad, but it is the way of the world: When children go to school, toys are left behind.”  So the little girl went to school but she would not participate.  Only her grandmother understood and offered a logical solution.  This is a heartwarming story that also makes a great read aloud.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Schubert, Ingrid and Dieter.  LIKE PEOPLE. Illus by Ingrid and Dieter Schubert. Honesdale, PA:
    
Lemniscaat, 2006.  ISBN: 978-1-59078-576-8 hb. $16.95.       Gr. K-3     E PIC

      Animal parents are like human parents who are raising their young.  The young ones play together as parents keep 
them safe until they learn to take care of themselves.  Child-rearing tasks may be borne more by one parent than another, 
and sometimes whole families raise the young ones.  Beautiful illustrations of diverse creatures show the variety of the 
habitats of mammals, birds and fish. A lovely "peacable kingdom" of sorts is depicted with activities centered around 
playing, feeding and building homes.   The book provides the young reader with a colorful  introduction to the differences 
and similarities within the animal kingdom.
       Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Shoulders, Michael.  SAY DADDY. Illus. by Teri Weidner.  Chelsea, MI:  Sleeping
     
Bear Press, 2008.  32p. ISBN: 978-1-58536-354-4 hb. $15.95.  Gr. PreS-K   E PIC

      From the moment this baby bear is born, his family reads books to him.  They compete for his attention and all want him to say their name for his first word. But he suprises them all when his first word is “book.”  This well written story shows how reading can make a difference in everyone's life. The pages are bright and full of color, great for reading aloud to young children.
      Melinda Hall, Librarian, Engadine School, Engadine, MI

Smalls, Irene or Smalls-Hector, Irene. KEVIN AND HIS DAD.  Illus. by Michael  Hays.
    Boston:  Little, Brown, 1999.   32p. 0-316-79899-1; hb. $15.95.   96-34830    PreS-Gr2     E

    What boy doesn't dream of spending a day alone with his father? Kevin experiences this pleasure when Mom is gone on a Saturday. Kevin and Dad begin with cleaning the house together, and then it is time for baseball practice and luckily, even a movie. Kevin is the narrator. Along with the lovely pictures, this book depicts the pride, fun, and love a boy can experience with a father on a one-to-one basis. The author uses a repetition of words in each line which make this title a practical, but fun book for a beginning book enthusiast.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Stewart, Amber.  NO BABYSITTERS ALLOWED.  Illus. by Laura Rankin. New York, NY:
            Bloomsbury USA, 2008. 10-1-59990-1544 hb.$16.99   PreS-K   Easy Pic.

Hopscotch is a typical little bunny, fun loving and happy until he learns that a babysitter is coming for the evening.  Soon his tummy is upset.  He does not like Mrs. Honeybunch at all, so he hides under a table tent.  Mrs. Honeybunch, a friendly and creative babysitter, starts reading storybooks aloud in a mixed-up order.  Finally, Hopscotch decides to come out of hiding to help her read the stories correctly.  Small children will love the watercolor illustrations.  Laura Rankin’s expression filled drawings capture the emotions of how young children feel when left with a babysitter for the evening and end on a gentle, reassuring note.
            Heidi Bretall, Elementary School ParaPro, Bessemer Public Library

Swanson, Susan Marie. THE FIRST THING MY MAMA TOLD ME. Ilus. by Christine Davenier. 
    New York: Harcourt, 2002. 40p. 0-15-201075-0; hb., $16.00    2001-00098   K-Gr.3    E

    What's in a name?  Our seven-year-old protagonist knows, that's for sure.  "Lucy" comes from a long-ago word for lily.  Lucy knows because her mama told her so. Lucy loved her name.  So did Dad, Grandpa, Uncle David, and her kindergarten teacher as evidenced by the little footstool built and customized with her name, the delicious pancakes cooked in shaped letters to form her name, name tag over her coat hook in school, and stomping in the snow.  They all spelled, "Lucy". The happily-ever-after is spelled out on Lucy's seventh birthday when her family (it now includes a younger sibling) celebrates with a cake served out on the porch and the opening of Lucy's special surprise--a flashlight.  Lucy uses this gift to write her name across the night sky that is the final spread and is the only illustration in which color fills up the entire two-pages.  Davenier combines, pencil, pen and pastels to capture Lucy's feisty personality and express the family love that radiates, glows and grows into a feeling of security and contentment for loveable Lucy.
    Patricia Fittante, Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Thomas, Joyce Carol. YOU ARE MY PERFECT BABY. Illus. by Nneka Bennett. New York:
    HarperCollins, 1999.   12 p.    0-694-01096-0; bd.bk.,  $5.95.    98-70238   PreS    BB

    Done in a combination of pastel crayon and watercolors,  this title is brimming with fantastic life-life pictures of a baby and its mother engaging in everyday activities. The storyline will be a winner with small children and babies. The author describes various body parts and activities of the perfect baby using rhyme, repetition and intriguing action words such as "twinkling toes....wiggly waist." Young ones from infancy to toddlerhood will have the building blocks of self-esteem put into place and squeal with delight while listening or looking at this board book.
    Charlotte Oshe, Assistant to Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI 

Tourville, Amanda Doering.  GO WASH UP:  KEEPING CLEAN.  Illus. by
          Ronnie Rooney.  How to be Healthy! Series.  Mankato, MN: Picture Window
          Books, 2009.  24p.  ISBN: 978-1-4048-4808-5 hb. $18.95.   Gr. K-2   E PIC

          Owen, a young boy, demonstrates that keeping clean can actually be fun while it contributes to good health. He looks very happy in the ink and water-color drawings as he goes through his daily routine of brushing teeth, flossing, cleaning his finger nails, bathing, shampooing, usually under the watchful eyes of his parents or his dog.  The book offers practical advice in an entertaining way.  If there's a reluctant bather in the family, try this book.
          Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Uegaki, Chieri.  ROSIE AND BUTTERCUP.  Ilus. By Stephane Jorisch. Tonawanda, NY:
          Kids Can Press Ltd., 2008.  32p.  ISBN: 978-1-55337-997-3 hb. $17.95.   PreS-2   E PIC.

          Although sibling rivalry and sharing themes aren't new, this endearing entry deserves a place on library shelves.  Rosie's life was perfect until the arrival of her little sister Buttercup. The initial enchantment with the new arrival and Buttercup's adoration of her big sister wears thin when Rosie has no time alone, crying disrupts the household and Rosie decides that she doesn't want a baby sister. Rosie finds the perfect solution to her dilemma; or has she? The story is well thought out, the feelings, including guilt are on target.
          Barbara Ward, Children's Librarian, Dickinson County Library, Retired

Waldman, Debbie.  ROOM ENOUGH FOR DAISY. Illus.by cindy Reuell. Custer, WA: Orca 
            Publishers, 2011. 32p. ISBN 978-1-55469-255-2 hb. $19.95       PreSch - Gr. 2      E PIC

            Everybody needs a “special box,” especially Daisy. Because her room was outgrowing all her “stuff” and because Daisy had difficulty parting with her treasures, Daisy tries diligently to persuade her parents to change rooms with her.  After all, their room was much larger.  No luck.  finally, Mother comes up with a suggestion - a “special box.”  Amazingly, the box transforms Daisy’s room and makes it much BIGGER!
           
Patricia Fittante, Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Waters, Kate.  MARY GEDDY'S DAY: A COLONIAL GIRL IN WILLIAMSBURG.   Photos by
    Russ Kendall.  New York: Scholastic, 1999.  0-590-92925-9 hb. $16.95.     Gr. 2-6        E  or   FIC

    The Prologue sets the story on May 15, 1776 in Williamsburg Virginia when the patriot leaders voted to declare Virginia free from Great Britain.  Told in the first person by a ten-year-old girl, Mary Geddy, who describes her daily activities.  Her best friend's family does not want to be free of British rule.  When Anne's family leaves after the vote, the war becomes personal to Mary.  Subdivisions in the Notes About the Book are: Williamsburg in Colonial Times; The Prelude to Independence; Slavery in the Virginia Colony; Native Americans in Colonial Virginia; The Geddy Family; Girlhood in 18th Century Williamsburg; Making Sweet Bags for Linen from Lavender; an Apple Pie Recipe; and information about Emily Smith, the nine-year-old third grader who is in the photos as Mary.  A glossary and paragraph about Colonial Williamsburg are helpful along with the notes make this book even more useful for independent research.  School and public libraries will wish to have this book which makes colonial life personal to young readers.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Wild, Margaret.  TOM GOES TO KINDERGARTEN.  Illus. by David Legge.  Morton Grove, IL: 
    Whitman, 1999.   32p.   0-8075-8012-0;  hb., $25.95    99-050420    PreS-K      E

     Tom and his family are pandas.  His parents are too busy to play with him so Tom plays with Baby.  Tom is very excited when he can start kindergarten but when it is time for his parents to leave him there, he begs them to stay.  The parents stay and enjoy themselves so much that they come again the next day, much to the chagrin of Tom's teacher, Mrs. Polar Bear.  Through the antics of Tom's parents, potential kindergartners learn about some of the activities they can expect to engage in when they go to school.  Eventually the parents go back to their jobs but now they take time to have fun with their little bears.  Without being didactic, Legge sends a message to parents who are reading this story.  The watercolor illustrations complement this humorous story.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Woodruff, Elvira. THE MEMORY COAT.  Illus. by Michael Dooling. New York: Scholastic, 
    1999. unp.   0-590-67717-9;hb., $15.95.  Gr. 2-5     E  or  FIC    PAULIN's PICKS

    Oil paintings illustrate this book about cousins from Russia who emigrate to the United States because of pogroms.   Rachel loved to tell stories and Grisha loved to draw pictures. They were frightened by the stories of emigrants who were turned away at the inspection at Ellis Island.  The family wanted Grisha to give up his tattered coat because it would not make a good impression but he liked it because it was lined with his mama's wool coat and he liked to feel her presence.  While playing with Rachel Grisha scratched his eye on a basket.  An inspector put an E on his coat, the mark of rejection for eye disorder.  Rachel saves the day by her ingenious plan which involves Grisha's coat.  Woodruff divides the Author's Note into three parts:  how she was inspired by exhibits at Ellis Island to write this story; why the jews wanted to leave Europe; and Ellis Island. School and public libraries will want to purchase this picture book.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Zalben, Jane Breskin.  BRENDA BERMAN, WEDDING EXPERT. Illus. by Victoria Chess.
      New York: Clarion Books,  2009.  48p. ISBN 9780618313211 hb. $16.00.    Gr. K-3     E PIC

      This delightful, picture book provides a window into the heart of a little girl who has to learn to share her favorite uncle. There is excitement, disappointment and a moment of bonding for the whole family. A must read for families with a wedding coming up. Delightful adult humor too!
      Liana Graves,  4-H Educator, Alger County, Munising School Public Library

Zeifert, Harriet.  33 USES FOR A DAD.  Illus. by Amanda Haley.  Maplewood, NJ:  
    Blue Apple Books, 2004.  unp. ISBN: 1-59354-028-0  hb. $12.95.  PreS - K   E   

    Dads can be remarkably versatile in the things they do for their families. Dad can be a dancing partner, chef, hand
holder, comedian, bug chaser, jar opener and friend.  There are 33 "uses" in all,  delightfully illustrated by pen and
watercolor.
    Judy Bennett, Ironwood Carnegie Library Clerk, Ironwood, MI 

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Fear

Austin, Margot.  A FRIEND FOR GROWL BEAR.    Illus by David McPhail.  New York:  
        HarperCollins, 1999.   ISBN  0-06-027802-1, hb. $14.95.      97-34347    PreS-Gr. 3      E

        Growl Bear was sad because he didn't have anyone to play with him so he asked Old Owl for advice on how to make friends.  Old Owl told all the forest animals that the little bear did not have any teeth so Rabbit, Squirrel, Mouse, and the songbirds were no longer afraid of him but didn't want to be his friends because he growled at them.    Finally, Old Owl solved the little bear's problem by telling the other animals that he was not trying to scare them but only knew how to say "G-r-r-r."  Besides the value of this book as a story about friendship, Upper Peninsula libraries will want it because it contains animals from the woodlands habitat.  Read the story aloud when teaching about forests.
        Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Brillhart, Julie. MOLLY RIDES THE SCHOOL BUS. Illus by author.  Morton Grove, IL: Whitman, 
    2002. 32p.    0-8175-5210-0; hb., $14.95    2001-004164     K-Gr. 2    E

    Don't expect to see Molly sitting around the library or planted on a shelf during any given school year, but especially in August and September.  She'll be voted #1 in her class.  Not the usual "first day of kindergarten" story, but rather a story that will really jumpstart the anticipatory juices for any five-year-old.  It is Molly's kindergarten debut and she is worried about riding the bus with all the big kids.  Mom consoles her and sends her off with a hug and her bear (which she drops before she finds an empty seat).   Suddenly Molly sees her buddy bear flying through the air and being tossed from seat to seat.  Willy finally ends up in the lost and found box.  It's fourth grader Ruby to the rescue!   Ruby retrieves the stuffed toy and returns it to our nervous newcomer, who decides that big kids are nice and riding the bus just might be fun.  The watercolor and ink illustrations touch upon the ethnic diversity of Molly's school as well as convey the action and adventure that can take place on an initial bus ride to kindergarten.  Brillhart's book will help reassure any young bus rider who is embarking on a first day of school and feel they just can't cut it.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Davis, Katie. SCARED STIFF.  Illus. by author. New York: Harcourt,
    2001. unp. 0-15-202305-4; hb., $15.00   00-8473   PreS-G. l     E

    Imagination in overdrive!  This is what Davis has created with her fourth book.  Our spirited young heroine, shoulders a boatload of fears...the blue dog next door that has to be a descendent of Clifford (she calls him “On” because each time she sees him, that's what she says, OH, NO!), some snakes that she is sure live in her closet (consequently she never opens the door) and monsters who hang out by the picket fence....just to name a few.  She decides this is not a good way to live so she transforms herself into a witch.  After all, witches are not afraid of anything.  With a bit of effort, anxieties vanish and our protagonist conquers her fears in an enjoyable and irresistible manner.  Davis' vivid artwork, done in acrylics and pen, sets the tone and helps reassure the reader that if one can face one's fears, there really is nothing to be afraid of. (Seems to me one of our presidents had that same thought more than half a century ago).
    Patricia Fittante, Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Golembe, Carla.  ANNABELLE'S BIG MOVE.  Boston:  Houghton Mifflin, 1999.
        unp.  0-395-91543-0,  hb. $12.00.     98-10970     PreS-Gr.3      E

        There are two stories in this book: "Annabelle's New Home" and "Annabelle's New Friends."  Human children who are facing a move will identify with the dog who faces similar changes.  Annabelle enjoys sleeping on her rug while it is snowing outside but one day her family packs up their belongings, heads for the airport, and moves to a sunny climate where she worries about making new friends.  One of the most priceless illustrations in the book shows Annabel's eyes on a dark blue background as readers assume she is in the hold of the airplane because the picture on the opposite page shows her in a traveling kennel amid suitcases.  The only words on the page are "After a long time..."  In the second story, Annabelle adjusts to her new home and year-round warm climate but is lonely and does not want to intrude on other dogs playing until Miranda takes her to the beach and urges her to play with the other dogs.  This book will make a good read aloud because there is a subtle message about making friends, even if you are not new. More obviously, school and public libraries should have the book to ease the pain of moving for young children.
        Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Jagtenberg, Yvonne. JACK THE WOLF.  Illus. by the author. Brookfield, CT:
    Roaring Brook/Millbrook, 2002. 24p. 0761328556; hb. $16.95    PreS-Gr.2     E

    The flavor of this book is different.  Jagtenberg, a Dutch author/illustrator,  portrays a story of Jack and his first day at school.  Overwhelmed is the feeling that encompasses Jack with good reason.  When Jack arrives at his classroom, a scary wolf appears to be looking at him.  As it turns out, the wolf is a mask, but this does nothing to diminish Jack's fears and when Jack is introduced to the class, he thinks maybe it is time to go home.  The illustrations resemble those that a child might draw.  Created with a lot of white background, the images take on the waxy look of crayons.  The text is short; simple, direct sentences characterize the feelings of the frightened boy.  Although Jack is finally convinced to try on the wolf mask, which does help to alleviate his fears, Jack never utters a word, so the reader is never quite sure.  It's anybody's guess!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Pfister, Marcus.  RAINBOW FISH AND THE BLUE WHALE.  New York:
      North-South, 1998.   26p.    0-7358-1009-5; hb., $18.95     PreS-Gr. 3      E

      Fans of Rainbow Fish expect shiny fins on the fish in Pfister's books and this group of fish each have a shiny sequin-like silver scale, except for one which is accepted but always looks glum.  The colorful underwater illustrations are the strong point of this book.  A weak point is that if the fish are "friends," they are probably from the same school and should look alike rather than different.  When the whale appears and eats their food and might possibly eat them, the fish are frightened.  Rainbow Fish is the peacemaker after a major misunderstanding.  Fans of Rainbow Fish will want this book also.
      Virginia Foreman; retired educator and library volunteer;

Poydar, Nancy.  FIRST DAY, HOORAY!  Illus by the author.  New York: Holiday,
      1999.   unp.   0-8234-1437-X; lib.bdg.,    $15.95.   98-19312     PreS-K.     E

       This book needs special advertising during the summer to help alleviate anxieties children have about going to school for the first time.  Ivy Green has lots of  questions for her parents while she gets ready for school by engaging in activities like buying a lunch box,   Readers also meet the people who will be working in Ivy's school:  the bus driver, principal, teacher, and custodian.  This satisfying book will be reassuring to preschoolers who are read to individually or in a story-time setting.  Kindergarten teachers may even want to use the book to introduce members of the educational community to new students.
        Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Sattler, Jennifer. PIG KAHUNA. New York: Bloomsbury, 2011.  32p.
            ISBN 978-159990-6355 hb. $14.99     Gr. K-2     E PIC

            Fergus and his brother Dink are always on the look-out for treasure that washes up on the beach.  
But they only take the things they find on the shore.  They would never go in the ocean because there is mucky
ickiness in the water.  One day they make their best find ever - a surf board, which they name Dave.  Dave becomes 
a constant companion to Fergus and Dink, until one day when Dink frees Dave by sending him out to sea.  Will 
Fergus face his fears to save Dave or will the mucky ickiness get the best of him?
            Megen Hood, Reading Specialist, Engadine Schools

Shannon, George. TIPPY-TOE CHICK, GO!  Illus by Laura Dronzek.  New York: Greenwillow/Harper, 
    2003.  32p.  0-06-029823-5; hb., $15.99  0-06-029824-3 lib.bdg., $16.89.   Pre-S-Gr. 2  E

    Every reader who enjoys folk tales that feature the littlest creature saving the situation when larger creatures fail, will appreciate this story.  A mother Hen and her Big, Middle, and Little chick are on their way to get bugs in the garden when they are stopped by a big, grumpy dog.  When they all fail, Little Chick saves the day.  The message of the book is that courage, even when one is frightened, can solve problems.  The acrylic illustrations are uncomplicated but effective and just right for the audience.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Singer, Marilyn.  BOO HOO BOO-BOO.  Illus by Elivia Savadier.  New York HarperFestival, 2002.  
     24p.  0-694-01566-0; hb., $9.95.   2001-088478     PreS-Gr. 2     BB   or    E

    There are three main characters, Lulu “Twirling in her tutu,” Andrew with his train, and Zuzu who is wearing her mother’s muumuu.  The three have one thing in common, they have fallen and hurt themselves so the refrain is the same “Oh no!  Boo hoo!, (name)’s got a boo-boo.”  There is a solution that makes them good as new in a day or two.  The illustrations provide action for the text and show the multicultural aspect of the characters.  There is internal rhyme as well as rhyme in the refrain.    Boo boos are close to the hearts of preschoolers who will enjoy the happy ending.   This book is a hybrid, a cross between a picture book and a board book.  The length is shorter, the pages are thicker than in a picture book, and the size is larger than a board book but the pages are not as thick or as spill-proof as pages in a board book.  This series provides a good transition between the two formats.  This book is one of the better ones in the series.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Thach, James.  A CHILD’S GUIDE TO COMMON HOUSEHOLD MONSTERS.  Illus.by David Udovic.
               Honesdale, PA:  Front Street, 2007.  ISBN 978-1-932425-58-1 hb. $16.95  PreS-Grade 2   E PIC
               The author puts a humorous twist to the age-old problem of monsters in the house.  A little girl discovers that 
her house is filled with monsters.  One after another, they lead her through the house.  Each monster is afraid of the other 
monsters.  Because they are all afraid of her, the reader gets a different prospective.   I thought this book was slightly 
scary for young listeners.
            Heidi Bretall,  Library Board Member, Bessemer Public Library, Bessemer, MI

Weigelt, Udo.  HIDING HORATIO.  Illus by Alexander Reichstein. Trans by Alison James. New York:  
     North-South, 1999.  0-7358-1067-2 hb  $25.95   0-7358-1068-0 lib.bdg.  $14.88    PreS-Gr. 3      E

      When the forest creatures (Mouse, Deer, Badger, and Wild Boar) introduced themselves, to the strange animal by the river, they learned that he was Horatio, a hippopotamus who escaped from a circus when he learned they were going to sell him.  The animals learned not to be afraid of Horatio when he opened his mouth wide to yawn.  Readers will enjoy the  nonverbal cues in the illustrations when the hunters search for Horatio and they are either leaning against him or sitting on top of him.   To thank the animals for saving his life by suggesting hiding places for him, Horatio sings for them.  Horatio is overjoyed with his new home and lives happily ever after with the forest animals.  This book is suitable for reading aloud.  Use it to raise questions about what animals live in various types of  forests.
      Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
 
Yaccarino, Dan.  FIRST DAY ON A STRANGE NEW PLANET.  New York: 
    Hyperion Books for Children, 2000.  0-7868-2499-9;hb. $14.00    Gr. Kdg-2    E  

    A clever, early chapter book prefaces the title page with an interplanetary exchange between students Blast Off Boy and Blorp. Galactic Space Exchange Program student, Blast Off Boy is having a hard time coping with his new school while on planet Meep. A little green alien boy, Blorp Glorp who loves adventures, is on his way to Earth to stay with the Smith family. Faced with typical outsider obstacLes, Blast Off Boy cringes while Blorp takes everything in stride. Students facing their first school experiences will relate to the anxiety suffered by Blast Off Boy, but if they are lucky, will hopefully absorb some of the positive attitude and willingness displayed by counterpart, Blorp. The simplicity of the story is appealing while the bright, bold illustrations are bound to pull the new reader right into the story. Yaccarino, in his quirky style, supurbly captures the alienating experiences OF a young child as he faces his FIRST DAY ON A STRANGE NEW PLANET.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

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Friendship

Apperley, Dawn.  BLOSSOM AND BOO: A STORY ABOUT BEST FRIENDS.
    Boston:  Little, 2000.  32p.  0-316-04963-8; hb. $14.95.  99-33323   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    Charming watercolor and pencil drawings introduce the friendship of Blossom and Boo, a bunny and a bear cub.  The friends move through the forest making flower wreaths, splashing stones, and picking berries.  When Blossom falls down and hurts her paw, Boo bandages it but mice steal their berries because "Some animals just aren't very nice."  Then Boo tells Blossom the sad news, he won't be able to play with her any more, he will have to hibernate.  When winter comes,  Blossom cries outside the cave because she misses her friend but cheers up when she remembers the good times they had together.  When spring comes, she hears a loud yawn then gets a hug from her best friend.  The only incongruity in this story is that the bear is the same size when it wakes up.  Otherwise, it is excellent for portraying the change of seasons and the concept of hibernation.  Maybe readers will see more of this pair.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Asch, Frank. BABY BIRD'S FIRST NEST.  Illus. by author.  New York: Harcourt
    Brace, 1999.  unp.  0-15-201726-7; hb., $14.00.   97-32653    PreS-Gr. 2    E

    Baby Bird takes a tumble out of her warm cozy nest, but Mama Bird is asleep high up intheir tree and cannot hear her baby calling for help. Beneath Baby Bird's tree lived Little Frog. With some help from her new friend, Baby Bird comes to realize that she can do things she neverdreamed possible. In typical Frank Asch style, the full-color artwork celebrates the story equally with the text. Asch's Baby Bear fans will check this out as soon as they discover it in the collection.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Caseley, Judith.  FIELD DAY FRIDAY.  Illus. by author.  New York: Greenwillow, 2000.
     32p.   0-688-16761-6; hb., $15.95   0-688-16762-4; lib.bdg.,$15.89.   PreS-Gr.3 E

     Mickey and his friend John, nicknamed Longjohn, live next door to each other and do everything together.  The stage is set for the conflict by showing their activities which include racing around the playground.  Then field day arrives and the boys are both on the Blue Team.  Longjohn drops the egg in the egg and spoon race.  Mickey loses the napkin during the Waiter and Waitress game, Mickey's shoe is at the bottom of the pile and then he is slow putting it on. Both boys were excited about the fifty-yard dash, their specialties, but Mickey's shoe falls off and he comes in last while Longjohn wins a first place ribbon.  Mickey doesn't enjoy the rest of the day and doesn't want to play with Longjohn.  Mickey's little sister gets Longjohn to help her make a ribbon for Mickey that says "First Place Brother" and "First Place Friend."  The boys decide to come in together next year.  This book is sure to stimulate discussion of being a good and a poor loser and the value of a good friend.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

deGroat, Diane. HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU, YOU BELONG IN A ZOO. Illus. by the author.  
    New York:  Morrow, 1999.  0-688-16544-3; hb. $15.00      PreS-Gr.2     E PIC

    Gilbert thinks Lewis wants to be his friend when he is invited to his birthday party.  The invitation says to bring a present.  Gilbert hopes that this will mean that Lewis won't tease him any more at school.  When Gilbert and his mother go shopping for a present, he doesn't like any of his mother's suggestions, especially the ones he would want for himself.  Finally Gilbert chooses a frying pan.  When he is at the party and the other gifts are being unwrapped, Gilbert realizes his mistake.  However, his mother saves the day for him.  The story is told with charm and humor.  Read the book aloud before having a frank discussion of bullies, friendship, and sharing with the listeners.  Recommended for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

DiPucchio, Kelly.  CLINK. Illus. Matthew Myer.  New York: Balzer & Bray, 32p.
           
ISBN 978-0061929281 hb. $16.99   Gr. K-2   E PIC

            Clink was such an old robot that he was literally falling apart a piece at a time.  Most children wanted a playmate who could do more than play music and make toast.  Clink had given up hope of ever finding a new home when a most unusual, harmonica-playing boy came into the shop.  Clink caught his attention by joining in with a dance number and the two hit it off.  It seems that there really is someone for everybody.  Matthew Myers brings this story to life and adds a few chuckles with engaging and offbeat illustrations in bright, rich colors.
           
Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Egielski, Richard.  SLIM AND JIM.  New York: Geringer/Harper, 2002.  32p.  
    ISBN 0-06-028352-1 hb., $15.95  0-06-028353-X lib.bdg., $15.89.   PreS-Gr. 3     E   

    Here is a picture book that has everything.  A “dirty rat” who is an orphan, a pirate cat who forces him into a crime, aka., Fagan from Dickens’ OLIVER TWIST, a good mouse from a good family, a jewel theft, a chase, a rescue from the river, a friendly frog family, a skeptical grandfather who has age-old prejudices, a real friendship, a kidnapping, a spectacular rescue, and a happy ending. All this and yo-yo’s too!  Does this sound trite?  Not the way Egielski has put the story and illustrations together.  Even the type, which looks like it comes from an old-fashioned typewriter, adds to the story.  The only thing this story doesn’t have is a beginning that says” It was a dark and stormy night.”  Through pictures and print, Egielski makes readers empathize with Slim, hate Buster the cat, and root for Jim in true melodrama style.  Would it be too coincidental for  a student of Maurice Sendak to win the Caldecott Medal the same year his teacher gives the Arbuthnot Lecture?  Probably not!
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Gordon, David.  SMITTEN: A LINT-FREE LOVE STORY.  New York:  Athenium Books,  
          2007.  ISBN: 978-1-4169-2440-1 hb.$15.99.    Gr. K-3.     E PIC

          A pink mitten, the right one, somehow became separated from her partner, while blue sock was carelessly dropped from a laundry basket--both were alone in the city.  A friendship formed and the adventure began as they searched for their "other half."  Scary things happened in the laundromat (sock shrank); mitten's yarn snagged and she unraveled to half her former size. But in this funny, lighthearted story, ingenuity conquered all adversities; and the two characters, mitten and sock, became "Smitten." Colorful illustrations add to the appeal, and there is a positive lesson to be learned besides.
          Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library

Gregory, Valiska.  A VALENTINE  FOR NORMAN NOGGS.  Illus by Marsha Winborn. 
    New York:  HarperCollins,  1999.  unp.   0-06-027656-8; hb.,  $14.95 0-06-027657-6;
    lib.bdg.,  $14.89    0-06-443623-3; pb., $5.95    96-48589    Gr. K-3     E

    Norman Noggs likes Wilhemina, a new girl, but so do the bullies,  Richard and Arthur.  The three animal boys vie for her attention.  Norman makes a valentine for her but the other boys  tear up two valentines when Wilhemina comes along and gives them several karate chops.  Then  resourceful Norman pulls out a third valentine.  If you think that first and second grade is too  young for a girl's voice to make a boy's stomach feel wobbly or her brown eyes make his knees  start to buckle, then this book is not for you.  If you like strong female characters or like to see  bullies get their due, then you will love this book.  When reading this book aloud, adults should  stop when the figure in the blue coat appears.  Then have students identify the person in the blue  coat and predict the end of the story.  This is a great valentine read aloud for teachers and  librarians.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Hesse, Karen.  COME ON, RAIN!  Illus. by Jon J. Muth.  New York:  Scholastic, 1999. 
    32p.   0-590-33125-6; hb., $15.95.    98-11575   PreS-Gr.4     E    Paulin's Picks Citation.

    The watercolor illustrations enhance this first person story about a little girl who squints at the endless heat and repeatedly says "Come on, rain!"  When the rain finally comes, the neighborhood girls dance, splash, squeal and whoop in the streaming rain and are eventually joined by their the mothers.  Newbery winner Hess's text and Muth's watercolors join to help readers share the sweltering heat as well as rejoice in the rain.  It is difficult to keep from dancing with the mothers and daughters at the end of the book.  This is a book that transcends time, place, or race.  Highly Recommended.  Every ALSC/ALA member has an opportunity to nominate books for the Caldecott Medal.  This book was one of my choices.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Hobbie, Holly.  TOOT & PUDDLE; YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE.  Illus by author.
    Boston:  Little, 1999.  32p.  0?316?36562?9; hb. $14.95   98?3665   Gr. K-3     E

    The sun is shining…oh happy day!  Happy for everyone that is except for an engaging swine, Toot, who is suffering a case of the blues.  Not even a five?berry cobbler or an adventurous river?rafting ride down the rapids can snap him out of it.  Puddle and Tulip, being the good friends they are, realize that everyone has to have an off day so they stage a picnic.  In short???nothing works.  That night "the biggest, scariest storm Puddle can remember" hits.  It's an all?nighter.  Everyone is afraid.  Everyone except Toot, that is.  He is out there braving the storm in his yellow slicker on a two?page spread that is sure to bring the sunshine into the hearts of all who savor it.  Hobbie has a fluid rhythm and does a graceful job with her gentle watercolor illustrations in dealing with a delicate issue.  Toot will help a child realize that it is OK to have a grump day and that indeed, the sun will come out tomorrow!
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Jahn-Clough, Lisa.  MISSING MOLLY. Illus by author. Boston: Houghton Mifflin,
    2000. 32p.  0-618-00980-9; hb., $15.00 hb.   99-20825    PreS-Gr. 2      E

    Hide-and-Seek is supposed to be fun, but not when Simon repeatedly wins.  Best friend, Molly, uses her ingenuity in this appealing story because the game has lost its suspenseful fun.  Our heroine comes up with "the best hiding idea ever" and both Simon and the young reader/listener are pleasantly puzzled with the hiding places and disguise.  The simple text and bright colorful artwork will draw the young child into the search for Molly and keep the story lively while adding a playful ingredient.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Jahn-Clough, Lisa.  MY FRIEND AND I.  Illus. by the author.  Boston: Walter Lorraine/
    Houghton Mifflin, 1999.  32p.  0-395-93545-8, hb., $15.00  98-30519   PreS-Gr.2    E

    A little girl is glad when a little boy moves next door because they play with their toys, sing songs, dance and become good friends.  Then one day the boy has a new bunny which they  fight over until the ears come off.  The two make up when she ingeniously attaches the ears andd apologizes.   Told in the first person by the little girl, this book is child-friendly in vocabulary, illustrations, and theme.  The vocabulary is written so that it could be easily read by first or second graders even though it is not in easy reader format.  This is a good choice for day care centers or public and school library collections.  School counselors will want to have it in their office collections to stimulate discussion.  Read it aloud or have kids read it to themselves.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Jennings, Sharon.  FRANKLIN AND OTTER‘S VISIT.  Illus by Sean Jeffry, Mark Koren,
    and Jelena Sisic.  Based on a TV episode written by Sharon Jennings.  Kids Can read with help
    series.  Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can, 2001.  32p.  1-55074-878-5 lib.bdg. $14.95    K-Gr. 3      E
   
    Even though Otter has moved away, the two correspond.  When Otter comes to visit, Franklin plans activities based on what the two had done in the past.  But Franklin is disappointed when playing blocks is too babyish,  Otter was too fast for them in a swimming race, and Otter wasn’t any good at playing baseball because he hadn’t played since he moved.  When Franklin tells his mother that Otter isn’t fun anymore his mother tells him that he has to “find a new way to be friends” so the boys solve their problem.  This story, based on the TV program, has bibliotherapy possibilities.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Kaminsky,  Jef.  POPPY & ELLA.  Illus by author. New York: Hyperion Books, 2000.
    48p.  0-7868-2447-6; hb., $14.99.     99-28505    K-Gr. 2    E

    Kaminsky writes an unusual book for young readers with three stories chronicling the fun and fights of two feathered friends, Poppy and Ella.  The chapters include a dinner date gone wrong, a trip to the beach where they don't get along, and a movie marathon where these lovable birds realize they do belong together.  This book tells of the ups and downs of friendship with descriptive words like "booger" which kids love.  The illustrations are bright descriptive watercolor pictures that everyone will enjoy.
    Charlotte Oshe; Children’s Assistant, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Kroll, Virginia.  RYAN RESPECTS.  Illus. By Paige Billin-Frye.  Series: The Way I Act Books.  
            Morton Grove, Illinois:  Albert Whitman & Company, 2006.   PreS-Gr. 1   BB

            This story demonstrates how a child's casual remark or thoughtless taunt can be hurtful and disrespectful. On the way to school, Ryan and Amy spot a slow-moving slug on the sidewalk. Part of the school-day activities included a running race in gym glass. Doug was the slowest, and Ryan labeled him "Doug the Slug."  Later on, Ryan was taunted by his big brother Judd, and he experienced the humiliation of being on the receiving end of a disrespectful remark. It is a well written and nicely illustrated, believable story about respecting another person's feelings.
            Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library, Ironwood, MI

Lester, Helen.  HURTY FEELINGS.  Illus. by Lynn Munsinger.  Boston, MA:  Houghton Mifflin Co., 2004. 
	32p. ISBN 0-618-41082-1 hb. $16.00         Gr. K-3   E PIC
               Helen Lester’s books have effectively used animal characters to bring children’s behaviors and emotions to the 
written page.  She has done it again by introducing  Fragility, the hippo, who is extremely sensitive to the spoken word.  
This hippo interprets everything the wrong way and isolates herself from her friends.  When a big bully comes to crash 
the neighborhood soccer game, Fragility overcomes her sensitivity to solve the problem.  As always, Lynn Munsinger 
adds comical illustrations to the story.  Human enotions on animal faces add believability to the characters.  Libraries and 
classrooms should add this title to their collections.
               Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Lexau, Joan M.  DON'T BE MY VALENTINE: A CLASSROOM MYSTERY . Illus. by Syd Hoff.  
    I Can Read Series.  New York: HarperCollins, 1985, 1999.  64p.   0-06-028239-8; hb; $14.95  
    0-06-023873-9 lib.bdg., $15.89  0-06-444254-3-pb. $3.95   85-42621   PreS-Gr.3    ER

     Sam is bugged by Amy Lou's constant advice so he writes a mean valentine verse for her that goes to his teacher instead.  Then Sam blames his best friend, Albert, for the mix-up.   The problem is realistically solved to the satisfaction of all parties.  Because of the variety of interpersonal relationships, it can be used for discussion purposes by counselors and teachers.  This book has more meat to it than most easy readers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Lyon, George Ella.  MY FRIEND, THE STARFINDER. Illus. by Stephen Gammell. New York: 
          Atheneum Books, 2008.  32p. ISBN: 978-1-4169-2738-9 hb. $16.99.    Gr. PreS – 2    E PIC

          Gammell's wonderfully whimsical art is a perfect match for this lovely story. It is a tribute to storytelling by a generation who has much to tell and offer children. The old man and young girl, who is entranced by his stories, are the only two characters in this tale, and all that are needed.  This book is not a necessary purchase, but a fine selection.
          Barbara Ward, Children's Librarian, Dickinson County Library, Retired

Marx, Patricia.  DOT IN LARYLAND: THE BIG little BOOK OF AN ODD-SIZED 
      FRIENDSHIP.  Illus by Roz Chast.  New York:  Bloomsbury U.S.A. , 2009.  32p.  
      ISBN: 978-1-59990-181-7 hb. $16.99.   Gr. K-3      E PIC
      This is a funny story about two unlikely friends.  Larry is Large and Dot is tiny.  This story relates the trials and tribulations of people who are "different" and how it is lonely to be that person.  It also tells of the happiness and enjoyment of finding someone who accepts you for who you are and wants to be your friend, despite any differences the two of you may have.
      Melissa Coyne, Substitute Teacher, Tahquamenon School Public Library

Novak, Matt.  JAZZBO AND GOOGY.  Illus. by author.  New York: Hyperion, 2000.  32p.  
    0-7868-0388-6; hb., $14.99   0-7868-2340-2; lib.bdg., $15.49    99-28507    PrS-Gr. 3     E

     Jazzbo takes his best buddy, his teddy bear, to school with him where Skitter and Weeza are best buddies.   Googy doesn't have a best buddy, probably becasue he ruins things, makes big messes, and doesn't play well.  One day when Jazzbo drops Big Bear in the mud, Googy cleans him  and the two become friends.  The old adage "You have to be a friend to have one" is the theme of this book.  Novak's book is comforting to children preparing to go to school for the first time.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Numeroff, Laura. THE BEST MOUSE COOKIE.   Illus by Felicia Bond..  New York:
    Laura Geringer/Harper Festival, 1999.  unp.  0-694-01270-X, bd.bk. $6.95.   BB

     As usual Bond's illustrations of Numeroff's famous mouse provide another element to the text.  As mouse bakes his cookies, he wears an apron with "I'm the BOSS" on it to provide the adults some extra fun which they will need because they will be reading this board book again and again.  Throughout the story, a human boy peeks into mouse's tree home and the last page provides the theme for the book, "...but the best cookie is the one you share with a friend." This is a successful board book because it not a whole picture book transferred to board book format but rather it has been adapted from 10 EASY TO MAKE COOKIE RECIPES.  Perhaps other editors of board books should take a lesson from this and not turn successful picture books into unsuccessful board books.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Pilkey, Dav.  BIG DOG AND LITTLE DOG: WEARING SWEATERS.  Big Dog and Little  Dog Series.  
 San Diego:  Harcourt, 1998.  0-15-200361-4, bd.bk.,  $4.95.  95-03918    PreS    BB

     This appealing look at friendship contains large, uncomplicated illustrations in bright primary colors which could stand alone and are its main attraction.  Only one or two short lines of text on each page tell a simple and predictable story:  Little Dog helps Big Dog find a sweater of his own.  One of a series of Big Dog and Little Dog books.  This warm and comfortable book makes a nice addition to a board book collection.
     Lynn Dragoo; Library Assistant, Spies Public Library, Menominee, MI
 
Slater, Dashka. THE SEA SERPENT AND ME.  Illus. by Catia Chien. New York: Houghton
          Mifflin Company, 2008.  ISBN 978-0-618-72394-2 hb. $17.00. Gr. PreS-K.  E PIC

          A child's fantasy delivers a beautiful sea serpent right out of the bathtub faucet into the tub. An ordinary bath became a delight for the little girl with a playmate that would swim and splash. But even sea serpents must continue to grow and live in their own vast "fish tank." It is with sadness that the little girl admits the time must come to say goodbye. The moral of the story: even goodbyes can have a positive twist and leave happy memories.  The acrylic and charcoal pencil illustrations enhance the story beautifully.
           Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library

Smallman, Steve.  DON’T WAKE THE BEAR!  Illus. Caroline Peler.  New York, NY: Scholastic, Inc.
            2011 US Edition. 32p. ISBN 978-0-545-33299-6  hb.$9.99      PreS - Gr. 1     E  PIC

            Children’s librarians and fans of the Bear books will welcome another romp, silly and filled with fun, scary anticipation and endearing, familiar characters. Readers and listeners new to the series will love the plethora of animals inhabiting the pages of the book.  Rhyming text flows merrily along, in perfect partnership with the bright illustration. These books are great entertainment and fun to read in preschool programs and for school visits. 
            Barbara Ward, Retired Children’s Librarian, Dickinson County Library

Stevens, Janet and Susan Stevens Crummel. MY BIG DOG.  Illustrated by J. Stevens.
    New York: Golden, 1999.  32p.   0-307-1022-3; hb. $9.95     98-84183     PreS-Gr.3      E

     This story is told in the first person by a special cat named Merl who was very possessive of her dish, sofa, chair, mouse, and bed.  Everything was purr-r-r-r-fect until a clumsy puppy moved into the house.  No matter where the cat went  in the house to get away from the puppy, it found her and licked her with it's sloppy drooly tongue.  Finally, the cat decided to take her mouse and run away from home.  She was taken in by a woman who dressed her up so she ran away again.  Eventually, the puppy found her and took her home.  Could they really become friends?   The answer is probably,  as long as the dog understands what belongs to her–all the above mentioned items with the addition of her big dog.  Sharing and friendship are the themes that come out during a good story but not overshadow it.  Stevens has some wonderful expressions on the faces of the animals who are the stars of the book; humans are only tolerated and are not even portrayed  in color.  This book is winner that deserves to be in every school and public library
      Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Stone, Phoebe. GO AWAY, SHELLEY BOO!   Illus. by author.  Boston: Little, 1999.
    32p.    0-316-81677-9   hb. $15.95.     98-15788    K-Gr. 3 E

    There's a new girl on the block.  As Emily Louise watches the moving van unload next door, she is certain that the new girl is no one she would want as a friend.  In her mind, she is convinced that this new girl is weird, that she likes strange things, and that she acts anything but cool...a real Shelley Boo. The neon-hued pastel paintings help tell Emily's story; both imagined and real, revealing much detail of Emily's world.  This humorous story is filled with spirit that will carry its reader from Emily's questionable beginnings right through to the beginnings of a brand new friendship at a teddy bear tea with..........Elizabeth! (Not Shelley Boo.)
    Patricia Fittante, Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Tankard, Jeremy.  GRUMPY BIRD.  Illus. by Jeremy Tankard.  New York:  Scholastic
            Press, 2007.  24p.  ISBN: 978-0-439-85147-3 hb. $12.99   Gr. PreS-K   EP
 
            This is a quirky, rather silly, book that children will relate to because everyone is grumpy sometime.  The illustrations are stylized drawings with dark outline and lots of color. The story characters learn a good lesson about why friends are important when we are grumpy.
            Bettina Graber, Library Trustee, Munising School Public Library,

Wagner, Karen.  BRAVO, MILDRED & ED.  Illus by Janet Pedersen.  New York:
    Walker, 2000. 32p. 0-8027-8734-7; $16.95  0-8027-8735-5; lib.bdg., $17.85
    00-021060    K- Gr.3    E

    Best buddies. Best friends.  Ed and Mildred were inseparable, but the day finally came when their togetherness was put to the test.  Mildred's violin recital and Ed's button collection opening were scheduled for the same day.  They had to find a way to support each other despite their separation.  Being a preschool teacher and mother in addition to being a gifted children's book writer, Wagner uses her ingenuity and talent and creates a satisfying conclusion----with the help of free-lance illustrator, Pedersen.  Together they have created a charming book that takes a look at a friendship so strong it supports two very diverse dreams.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Wells, Rosemary.  YOKO.  Illus. by author.  New York: Hyperion, 1998.  32p.
     0-7868-0395-9; hb., $14.95   0-7868-2345-3; lib.bdg., $14.89      PreS-Gr.1    E

     Yoko is an Asian-American kitten who goes to first grade where her classmates, other animals, laugh at her traditional lunch.  To solve the problem, her teacher, a fox, writes a note to parents to provide food for International Food Day.  Yoko's mother makes sushi for the entire class and readers see the other families and the dishes they provide.  The teacher wants everyone to try everything but no one touches the sushi so the teacher's plan is foiled.  However, Timothy Raccoon is still hungry and tries the sushi and Yoko shows him how to eat it with chopsticks.  The two decide to open their own restaurant at school and become friends.  The book is realistic because finicky eaters often outwit the best intentions of adults.  The book's appeal is on the universal themes of being different and the value of friendship.  This was one of my favorite books for this year.  Because the children are first graders, share it with children first grade and below even though the theme is useful to share with children up through third grade.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
 

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Love

Brami, Elisabeth.  MOMMY TIME!.  Illus. by Anne-Sophie Tschiegg. LaJolla, CA:
    Kane/Miller, 2001. unpg. 1-929132-22-0; $9.95 hb. 2001094571 Presc-gr1 E

    Though the book is small, the child's fantasies are big time. While at school during the day, a child tries to imagine what her mother does while she is gone. With the help of Anne-Sophie Tschiegg's ingenious illustrations it leads the reader to many humorous imagined situations. The neat thing is that Tschiegg does this by superimposing a heavy-lined stick figure of mom over the activity that is in the child's mind....from the silly to the sublime.  "Is she crying  in front of my school?/Is she bending over backwards?/Is she riding a motorcycle?/Is she thinking of having another baby?/Is she buying a snack for me?/ Has she forgotten what time it is?"  And of course, the final thought, "IT'S MOMMY TIME!" Many a preschool attendee or first time kindergartener will find solace in the book, knowing that there are others out there who have these same questionable feelings that come with leaving Mommy behind. All readers will agree that anytime is
"Mommy Time"
   Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Carr, Jan.  SWEET HEARTS.  Illus by Dorothy Donohue.  New York: Holiday, 2002.
    32p.   0-8234-1732-8; hb., $16.95  2001-059404   PreS-Gr. 2   E

    This book begins with a page about how Valentine’s Day got started and ends with directions for making hearts.  The collage illustrations show this panda family and the valentines they make and give to each other.  The story, told in rhyme, is simple but profound--the child is their “sweetest heart.”  This will enhance any holiday collection but could be enjoyed year round.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Chwast,  Seymour. TRAFFIC JAM.  Illus by author.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.
    32p. 0?395?97495?X; hb.,  $15.00    98-45865     Pre-Gr.2    E

    "The best laid plans of mice and men"…and cats!…don't always turn out as originally intended.  Such is the case in this heart?warming picture book which follows a mother cat crossing the street with her troublesome kitten and then turns into a comical, exciting, and touching adventure.  Unusual in its format, after Officer Grumm blows his whistle to stop the oncoming traffic a single page unfolds to show a traffic jam.  But it doesn't stop here.  Unfold the page a second time to show an even bigger traffic jam, and then one more time to witness an enormous jam waiting for two cats who want to cross the street.  It may create a feeling of de ja vous relating to McCloskey’s MAKE WAY FOR DUCKLINGS.  The story is slim, but Chwast includes speech bubbles that reveal the grumbling of all the waiting passengers.  The brilliant illustrations translate the feelings of everyone who goes the same journey that James takes; a search for one's place in the world and a search for love.  Because of all the details this book will get many reruns!
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Edwards, Richard.  ALWAYS COPYCUB.  Illus by Susan Winter.  New York: 
    HarperCollins, 2001.  32p.  0-06-029691-7; hb., $14.95     PreS-Gr. 2   E

 Copycub liked to play hide-and-seek with his mother because she always found him.  But one spring day he hid in a hollow tree but his mother did not find him.  So he tried to walk home but took the wrong path and was lost.  When his mother finally found him she scolded him for running off on his own and he promised not to do it again.  Copycub asked his mother “If I get lost, will you always come to find me?”  Of course his mother’s answer was “ Always.”  This is a “warm fuzzy” story of unconditional love.  Getting lost is one of the greatest fears of preschoolers and this book has a satisfactory ending.  The only discordant note in the book is that the cub comes out of hibernation the next year and is still the same size.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Falconer, Ian.  OLIVIA.  Illus by author.  New York:  Atheneum, 2000.  40p.
    0-689-82953-1; hb., $16.00   99-24003    PreS-Gr.3      E      PAULIN’S PICKS.

    The understated text, enhanced by the charcoal and gouache illustrations, works together to make this a memorable picture book.  The only splash of color in the book is red, which accents the shades of charcoal.   The illustrations significantly add to the text.  When Olivia is at the beach, “She feels it is important to be prepared.”  The illustrations show her in a red bathing suit with flotation bands on her arms, earplugs, flippers, and goggles.  Oliva has a younger brother and “Sometimes Ian just wouldn’t leave her alone, so Olivia has to be firm.”  The illustration shows Olivia wearing a scary paper bag mask over her head.
    The book begins “She is very good at wearing people out.”  Although Olivia is a piglet, she is reminiscent of the human child in Mem Fox’s book, HARRIET, YOU’LL DRIVE ME WILD. (Harcourt, 2000)    Both books end with the mothers loving their children anyway, which is reassuring to readers.   Although the theme is familiar, Falconer, a master of understatement, has provided readers with a new and fresh approach.  This is an essential purchase for even the smallest school and public library and was my favorite picture book for 2000.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center  *This is a 2001 Caldecott Honor Book

Fox, Mem.  HARRIET, YOU’LL DRIVE ME WILD!  Illus by Marla Frazee.
    San Diego:  Harcourt,  2000.  32p.  0-15-201977-4; hb., $16.00     PreS-K     E

    This is a story of unconditional love.  The opening page sums up this little girl:   “Harriet Harris was a pesky child.  She didn’t mean to be.  She just was.”   No matter what mischief Harriet gets up to, her mother repeats the refrain, “Harriet, my darling child.  Harriet, you’ll drive me wild.  Harriet, sweetheart, what are we to do?”  Harriet always replies: “I’m sorry,” said Harriet, and she was.”  The last straw comes when Harriet, with the help of her dog, rips apart a feather pillow.  Mother yells and yells; then the two laugh together.  This is a good book for libraries, for family giving, or for parenting classes.   Fox, an educator from Australia, has the ability to take universal themes and translate them into picture books that touch both adults and children.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Jones, Lara.  I LOVE HUGS.  Illus by author.  New York: Scholastic, 2001.  14p.
    0-439-36767-0    PreS   BB

    A child begins by saying “I love hugs,” and then tells about others who like hugs. Each hug is special, the teddy bear loves bear hugs and the baby brother needs a make-it-better hug.  Others who get hugs are cat, a best friend, and a baby brother’s birthday hug.  The book concludes with time-to-go-home and bedtime hugs.  The child is dressed in unisex clothing but the hair could possibly belong to boy and the pants might be leggings on a girl.   There are other books about hugs but this one describes special kinds of hugs in an age appropriate manner.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

McPhail, David.  SISTERS.  Illus by author.  San Diego: Hardcourt, 1984, 2003.  32p. 
    0-15-204659-3; hb., 9.95     2002-003755     PreS-Gr. 3     E

    First published in 1984, this picture book about sisters is a favorite.  The first half of the book is devoted to differences and the last half focuses on similarities.  The last sentence is “Because, you see, they loved each other so very much.”   This is an intensely personal book that can be recommended by librarians to patrons for reading or personal giving.  The pen and ink and watercolor illustrations complement the text and add to the personal nature of the concept.   Libraries that don’t already have this book need to purchase it.  
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Melmed, Laura Krauss.  A HUG GOES AROUND.  Illus by Betsy Lewin.  New York:  HarperCollins, 
    2002.  32p.  0-688-14680-5; hb., $15.95.  0-688-14681-8; lib.bdg.,  $15.89    PreS-Gr.3    E

    This rhyming picture book begins “A mountain goes up.  A valley goes down.  Where does a hug go?  A hug goes around.”  The last sentence is repeated throughout the book, showing many ways there are enough hugs to go around in a family.  At the end of the day, the children are hugged and tucked into bed and the parents look at the moon and share a different type of hug.  The black line and watercolor illustrations express the love and joy in this family.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Oldland, Nicholas.  BIG BEAR HUG.  Toronto, ON:  Kids Can Press, 2009. 32p.
          978-1-55453-464-7; hb., $16.95.    PreS-Gr. 2.    E PIC

          Oldland’s main character is a bear who loves to hug, especially trees, offering a new take on the phrase "bear hug."  The bear just roams the woods filled with love.  The love spills out in the form of bear hugs to animals and trees.  The bear's problem arrives in the form of a man with an axe who wants to chop down an old tree.  The bear needs to decide to either eat the man, or...what?  The artwork in this story is primitive, but appealing to younger children.  The eyes on the animals receiving bears hugs are precious to behold.  The story presents an interesting approach to forest preservation.
          Chris Collins, L'Anse Area School/Public Library, L’Anse, MI

Paterson, Katherine. Illus. by Vladmir Vagin.  CELIA AND THE SWEET, SWEET WATER.
   
New York:  Clarion, 1998. 32 p.    0-395-91324-1; hb., $15.00   95-41632    Gr. K-3    E    

    Whether read to primary children or read independently by upper level children, readers will be drawn to the antics and spunky attitude of Brumble, the dog, companion to Celia.  Celia is on a quest for the "sweet, sweet water of her mother's childhood in order to save her mother's life. Celia's generosity and optimism are sharply contrasted to Brumble the dog's
sense of doom, yet together they meet many challenges as they search for the healing water. On this journey Celia encounters three unhappy and lonely people but through her selflessness and optimism, Celia helps each change their perspective on life. Russian artist Vagin uses watercolor to convey a richly detailed traditional setting typical of folktales. Simple borders separate the text from the illustration except on the two wordless double page spreads. This book would be a good addition to studies of literary fantasy or of how one's attitude can affect the way in which one faces challenges.
    Sandra Imdieke; Ph.D.  Dept. of Education, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI
    15 years as an educator; Professor of children's literature

Patrick, Jean L. S.  IF I HAD A SNOWPLOW.  Illus by Karen Dugan.  Honesdale,
    PA:   Boyds Mills, 2001.  2001.  32p. 1-56397-746-X; hb., $14.95  00-103741
     K-Gr. 4   E

    Despite the soft illustrations, this is a boy’s book about a braided rug with a variety of toy machines.  He begins saying “If I had a snowplow, you know what I’d do?”  This same pattern is repeated for a loader, cement mixer, tractor, tree spade, tow truck, fire truck, cherry picker, backhoe, bulldozer, crane, dump truck.  The boy elaborates what he would do for his mother.  At the end of the book, even through he has played with those items, he says he doesn’t have any of them in reality and will stay inside all day and hug her.  The rhythmic pattern flows from beginning to end of this story of a child and his love for his mother.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist
 
Roth, Carol.  MY LITTLE VALENTINE.  Illus by Jennifer Beck Harris.  New York:   
     HarperFestival, 2003.  18p.  0-06-009120-7; bd.bk., $5.99  PreS   BB

    When a mother animal tells her valentine baby that she loves him “in every way,” he offers seven  “What ifs.”  He asks “What if butterflies were big, and elephants were small?  She replies “I’d love you best of all.”  The illustrations do a good job of illustrating the text.  However, the animal could be a dog or a mouse.  The face looks like it could be either but the tail is too short for a mouse. This does not distract from the message of this board book.  The rhyme helps the text to flow smoothly.  This is a reassuring book for preschoolers.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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Size

Denslow, Sharron Phillips.  BIG WOLF AND LITTLE WOLF.  Illus. by Cathe Felstead.
    New York:  Greenwillow, 2000.  32p.    0-688-1617-X; hb., $15.95   0-688-16175-8;
    lib.bdg.,   $15.89   99-11712     PreS-Gr.3     E

     There are no big bad wolves in the pen and ink and watercolor illustrations in this charming picture book.  Little Wolf asks his daddy to sing him a good-night song.  Because lyrics only are included, the reader can sing the verse to any yowly tune.  The story is just scary enough for listeners because they hear a rustling and growling, a scritching and scratching;  "Something was in the bushes!"  It is Mama Wolf and his parents sing Little Wolf to sleep.  Listeners can't help but join in for the last yowl.  Read this book aloud for lapsit programs and pair this book with Pinkwater's WOLF CHRISTMAS (Cavendish, 1998)  for a preschool story hour program.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Hill, Susan.  STUART LITTLE:  STUART AT THE FUN HOUSE .  I Can Read series.
    Illus by Lydia Halverson.  New York:  Harper, 2001.  32p.  0-06-029539-2 hb.
    $14.95.     0-06-444304-3 lib.bdg., $14.89   00-050557.  Gr.  1-3    ER

    Stuart Little and his brother George go to an amusement park in this easy reader.  Everything they try doesn’t work for Stuart because he is not strong enough, not heavy enough, or not tall enough.  Then they go into the fun house where they both can enjoy the mirrors.  George realizes that he needs to allow Stuart to pick a ride that they both can enjoy.  Fans of the movie/video will enjoy reading this book which is preferable to those by Shaymalan and Brooke, STUART LITTLE:  STUART‘S LITTLE BROTHER.  (Harper, 2000) which have fuzzy illustrations taken from the movie/video frames and are not recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Nimmo, Jenny.  ESMERALDA AND THE CHILDREN NEXT DOOR. Illus. Paul Howard.  
    Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2000. 32p.   0-618-02902-2 hb., $15.00   99-28563    K-Gr. 3      E

    Big and strong does not necessarily mean that every young girl in this robust condition wants to be a Strong Woman with the circus.  Esmeralda certainly doesn't want to, to say the least.  But her parents, who themselves are circus people, think otherwise.  All Esmeralda wants is to play with the kids next door (but she is such a big girl she frightens them and they yell at her to go away).   The children don't realize that Esmeralda has a soft and gentle nature and loves to make fragile origami animals (her only friends).   Howard’s soft pastel illustrations mark the contrast between the huge, but sweet, Esmeralda and the "ordinary" kids and bring Esmeralda's feelings of rejection to life through the down-turned lines of the mouth and the anxious lines by the eyes.  The turning point comes when Esmeralda catches a falling branch just before it lands on the neighbor's baby sleeping in a carriage.  Through her heroic act of bravery, Esmeralda appears to have lost her strength and is forced to lie in bed all winter.  Grateful and guilt ridden, the neighbor children find they miss Esmeralda, so they pay her a penitent visit and ask her to be their friend.  Do they deserve her friendship?  Let the reader decide.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Pilkey, Dav. BIG DOG AND LITTLE DOG: WEARING SWEATERS.  Illus by author.  
      San Diego: Harcourt, 1998. unp. 0-15-200361-4, bd.bk., $4.95.    95-03918    PreS    BB

    This appealing look at friendship contains large, uncomplicated illustrations in bright primary colors that could stand alone and are its main attraction. Only one or two short lines of text on each page tell a simple and predictable story: Little Dog helps Big Dog find a sweater of his own. One of a series of Big Dog and Little Dog books. This warm and comfortable book makes a nice addition to a board book collection.
    Lynn Dragoo, Library Assistant, Spies Public Library, Menominee, MI

Pinczes, Elinor J.  INCHWORM AND A HALF.  Illus by Randall Enos.  Boston:
    Houghton Mifflin, 2001.  32p.  0-395-82849-X; hb., $15.00    Gr. K-3    E

    This book is about measuring in inches and fractions of inches using an inchworm and smaller worms who are fractions of an inch.  A movement loop is made by the inchworm, a double loop is made by the half-inchworm, and three loops are made by the one-third-inch fraction to show relative size and movement.  In this example both text and illustrations share this concept.  The overall effect of the book is muddied when seven-inch celery or eight-inch ears of corn are interjected into the story even though they are not actually that size. Viewers are confused because the vegetables appear much smaller on the page than the worm who is an inch and his friend who is a half-inchworm.  Perhaps the illustrator was attempting to show perspective.  If so, the attempt was not successful.  On the back page, there is a picture of the inchworm standing next to a ruler that is next to a pear.  The inchworm is as tall as the inch but the next two inches are the same length as each other but are shorter than the first inch.   If a book’s theme is devoted to measurement, these are serious flaws.  This is unfortunate because the linocut illustrations are otherwise engaging.  Although picture books often impart information in a more interesting and subtle way than nonfiction books, readers would be better served with Koomen’s no nonsense nonfiction book, FRACTIONS:  MAKING FAIR SHARES (Captstone, 2001).
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Shavick, Andrea. YOU'LL GROW SOON, ALEX. Illus. by Russell Ayto.  New York:
    Walker, 2000. 32p.  0-8027-8736-3;hb.,  $15.95    Gr. K-3      E

    Alex is small.  Alex does not like being small.  Other kids are big or bigger.  Alex is not happy.  What can Alex do about being short?   Eating eggs, fish and cheese for three weeks as his mother suggests doesn't help.  Three additional weeks of running, jumping and hanging from a stretching machine do not make him grow.  Sleep, suggests his sister.  Read, suggests his teacher.  But Alex stays short and miserable.  Finally, tall Uncle Danny comes for a visit. Being tall has some disadvantages too because Uncle Danny is always wearing a bandage on his forehead and Alex comes to self-realization and self-acceptance.  Ayto's cartoon illustrations and the simple text radiate a warmth that provide a simple lesson of life.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Stevens, Janet and Susan Stevens Crummel. MY BIG DOG. Illus. J. Stevens. Family Storytime Series.  
    New York:  Golden, 1999. 32p. 0-307-1022-3; hb. $9.95     PreS-Gr.3      E

    This story is told in the first person by a special cat named Merl who was very possessive of her dish, sofa, chair, mouse, and bed. Everything was purr-r-r-r-fect until a clumsy puppy moved into the house. No matter where the cat went in the house to get away from the puppy, it found her and licked her with its sloppy drooly tongue. Finally, the cat decided to take her mouse and run away from home.  Merl was taken in by a woman who dressed her up so she ran away again. Eventually, the puppy found her and took her home. Could they really become friends?  The answer is probably, as long as the dog understands what belongs to her–all the above mentioned items with the addition of her big dog.  Sharing and friendship are the themes that come out during a good story but do not overshadow it. Stevens has some wonderful expressions on the faces of the animals that are the stars of the book; humans are only tolerated and are not even portrayed in color. This book is winner that deserves to be in every school and public library
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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Time

Ballard, Robin.  MY DAY, YOUR DAY.  Illus by author.  New York:  Greenwillow/Harper, 2001. 
    32p.   0-688-17796-4; hb., $14.95.   0-06-029187-7; lib.bdg., $14.98    PreS-Gr.2     E

    This is a clever and informative picture book.  The premise is explained in the first two sentences.  “My day is at day care.  Your day is at work.”  Each illustration on the left page shows children engaged in activities at day care like planting seeds.  On the right hand page, the text says “Planting seeds.”  The sentence is accompanied by three pictures of adults engaging in activities that have to do with plants.  This pattern is repeated for 9 other activities.  On the last page the children are reunited with parents.  The pen and ink and watercolor illustrations are a good complement for the text.  This picture book serves several functions.  It gives children the assurance that they will be picked up by their parents at the end of the day, equates their job with their parents’ jobs, and introduces community helpers.  It is unclear why there is a period at the end of the single phrase or word on the pages because none of them are complete sentences.  This feature mars an otherwise perfect picture book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Ballard, Robin. TONIGHT AND TOMORROW.  Illus. by author.  New York: Greenwillow,
    2000.  24p.   0-688-167910-X, hb., $15.95.    98-50789   PreS-G. 2     E

    Done in first person, this comforting bedtime story is about a young boy who drifts off to sleep knowing that tomorrow his room will be full of light.  He anticipates the full circle of what tomorrow's routine will bring: a day at school, playtime with his best friend, feeding his cat, a bedtime story, and again a warm fuzzy good-night. The concept of time and sequencing is a bonus with this story while the theme itself should help to ease a young reader's nighttime fears.  The soft illustrations create a soothing effect.  Youngsters will snuggle down with comforting thoughts and sweet dreams after this nocturnal send-off.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Brian, Janeen and Stephen Michael King.  WHERE DOES THURSDAY GO?  New  York:
    Clarion, 2001.  32p.   0-618-21264-7; hb. $14.00   2001-047187    Gr. 2-3    E

    Bruno, a polar bear enjoyed his birthday so much that he didn’t want it to end.  When he realized that his birthday would be gone in the morning, Bruno wondered what happened to it during the night so he wanted to say goodbye to it before it went.   The central question in this picture book is “Where does Thursday go before Friday comes?”    Bruno and his friend Bert look for it.  They looked at a river from a bridge and called out for Thursday, but there was no reply.  The looked in a tree, at the edge of a lake, at a train tunnel, and at the edge of the sea but they had no luck.  They discussed what Thursday could possible look like and decided it was all of those things.  When the moon came up it looked like a silver birthday balloon so they decided maybe the moon was Thursday.   Satisfied, they go to bed until the sun brought Friday.  The idea is quite abstract for the age of the audience.  The first word on each page is written so that it looks like a child’s printing.   The very first word, “It” looks like the numeral one and a cross rather than the word “It,” creating a jarring note.  Use with older primary children rather than preschoolers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Kindley, Jeff.  SCAMPER'S YEAR.  Illus. Laura Rader.  Bank Street Ready-To-Read Series,
    Level  l. Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens 1999.  32p.  0-8368-1777-X  lib.bdg. $18.60   PreS-Gr. 1     ER

        This easy reader  follows Scamper, a young squirrel, as he experiences nature's changes and watches the seasonal activities of several children through the year.  Each season intrigues him and he finds they all have something to offer.   Rader's  colorful illustrations portray exactly what is happening in the text on each page.  Besides being a delightful story to read, this book could be used as an aid in a discussion or with a unit on the characteristics and activities of each season.
        Alice Johnson; First Grade Teacher, Sawyer Elementary School, Gwinn, MI

Lobel, Anita.  ONE LIGHTHOUSE ONE MOON.  Illus. by author. New York: Greenwillow, 2000.  
    32p.  0-688-15539-1; hb., $15.95     0-688-15540-5; lib.bdg., $15.89      98-50790   PreS-Gr. 3     E

     "All Week Long" shows the same cat on pages for Monday through Sunday along with different colored human feet, legs, and shoes such as Tuesday's red shoes.   "Nini's Year" shows the same cat, which readers learn is named Nini, in each frame along with a sentence about each of the twelve months.  "In the last month, Nini waits for good things and the following page shows her with her new kittens.  "One Lighthouse, One Moon" shows Nini only on the first and last page.  The numerals move from one to ten with a nautical theme.  The lighthouse appears in illustrations in the first and last story but does not figure in the narration.  The double page spread at the end of the book shows one hundred stars and one moon.  This picture book shares four concepts with readers: days of the week, color, months, and numbers from 1 to 10.  It's like having four books instead of one which makes it a bargain for preschool, school, public and home libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Nidey, Kelli.  WHEN AUTUMN FALLS.  Illus. by Susan Swan.  Morton Grove, IL:  
    Albert Whitman & Co., 2004.  unp.  0-8075-0490-4 hb. $10.85.   PreS-Gr. 2     E
   
    Two things make this book a great read-aloud for younger students.  The first is the pictures, which are bright and cover the pages from end to end, making them easy to see.  They are composed of cut paper placed in layers for a nice 3-D effect.  They are amazing!  The second element of a good read-aloud book is the size and placement of text on each page.  The sparce text is clear and large; black on light colors and white on dark colors.  The story takes readers from the cooler weather at the beginning of school through Halloween to Thanksgiving and darkness as the year progresses to winter.  Teachers could include this book in the study of seasons.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

O’Mara, Carmel.  GOOD MORNING.  San Diego:  Red Wagon/Harcourt, 2001.
    16p. 0-15-202135-3; bd. bk., $3.95.   98-89365   PreS   BB

    Although the size of the four board books in this series is smaller and the pages are thinner than many board books, these titles more than make up for this with their spirit and heart.  A little bear wakes up in bed with a smile, tickle, giggle, hug, and kiss. Would that each human child should be as lucky as this little bear.   All four are highly recommended for day care, home, and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

O’Mara, Carmel.  GOOD NIGHT.  San Diego:  Red Wagon/Harcourt, 2001.
    16p. 0-15-202136-1; bd. bk., $3.95.   98-89366   PreS   BB

    This bedtime board book is particularly satisfying as a parent prepares a little bear for bed.  The narration consists of one or several words per page.  The book begins with a yawn and includes a bath, a bedtime story, and sweet dreams.  Young readers will identify with this anthropomorphic bear.  Highly recommended for day care, home, and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Omerod, Jan.  MISS MOUSE’S DAY.  Illus by author.  New York:  HarperCollins,
     2000.  32p.  0-688-16334-3; hb., $14.95    PreS-Gr.1    E

     “My Day, By Me, Miss Mouse” begins with a cuddle and a story--with much much more to follow.  This little rodent has to be jet-propelled and only her juvenile audience will have the energy to keep up with her.  Omerod’s action-packed brilliant illustrations are a sharp contrast to the abbreviated test, a text a beginning reader could quickly conquer.  The boxed vignettes, several to a page, reveal the progression of Miss Mouse’s busy day that is finally turned topsy-turvy when poor Miss Mouse is left behind when her playmate is hauled off to take a bath.  However, the night is made right, when Daddy Mouse comes to the rescue, bathes Miss Mouse, gets her ready for bed, and caps the evening off with a bedtime story.  A perfect ending to a perfect day!  A perfect story!
    Pat Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Pelletier, Andrew. SIXTEEN MILES TO SPRING. Ill. by Katya Krenina. Morton Grove, IL:
    Whitman, 2002. 32p.  0-807-57388-4; hb., $15.95    200-004317    K-Gr. 3     E

    Prefaced by the author's helpful explanation of the seasons, the reader better understands the meaning of the title.  Meeting Maddy, the reader finds that she feels that something exciting is about to happen.  On her way into town with her father, Maddy sees an old pickup with a sign that reads "Sixteen Miles to Spring."  Maddy and her father stop to see if the driver and his cohort need help.   Each year the pair travel together from the south and drive just sixteen miles a day.  The reason they travel this limited mileage is because that way the two know that spring is always waiting for them. In their pickup is a sack of seeds, dirt and straw that they toss into the air along the way and spring seemingly blooms in their shadow.  Pelletier has developed a lovely story that matches the beauty of Krenina's colorful illustrations.  Flowers pop, birds sing---it is spring!
    Patricia Fittante, Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

 Rosenberry, Vera.  RUN, JUMP, WHIZ, SPLASH.  Illus. by the author.  New York:
    Holiday, 1999. 32p.  0-8234-1378-0; lib.bdg., $15.95.  98-14060    PreS-Gr.3     E

        Linking the senses  with seasons using poetic language and two children makes for an attractive and interesting way to learn about the seasons.  Children can add their own Summer is when... or Winter is when...descriptions.  "Autumn is when/ the fluttery pile of dry leaves grows/And you JUMP so high in the crunch and smell/And sink, sink, sink down, the sky above,/Then you jump again."  Children who live where they experience the seasons will identify with this book and children who live where the seasons don't change will wish they did.  Recommended for all day care, school and public libraries.
        Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ray, Deborah Kogan.  LILY’S GARDEN.  Brookfield, CT:  Roaring Brook/Millbrook, 2002.
    32p.  0-7613-1593-4; hb., $16.96  0-7613-2653-7; lib.bdg., $23.90     K-Gr. 3      641.3

    The book begins when “a box of juicy oranges arrived from Grandma and Grandpa” who have gone to live in California for a year.  The book consists of two parts, the largest is a first person narrative from a unisex child who tells what it is like to live in Maine throughout the year and a variety of outdoor activities are presented.  There is a month listed on the bottom of each right hand page.  On the left hand page there is information about crops, some of which are in California where her grandparents are for the season, but most are in Maine.  The information about the crops appears in a sidebar on the left-hand page.
    The book has a Dewey Decimal number but the bulk of the narrative is fiction.  This book is interesting but the book suffers from a split personality.  It is really a story. The book ends in December when the grandparents return for the holidays to place the star on the Christmas tree.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Rylant, Cynthia.  IN NOVEMBER.  Illus. by Jill Kastner.  San Diego:  Harcourt, 2000.
    32p.  0-15-201076-9; hb., $16.00.  98-22276  PreS-Gr.3  E

    This is a perfect marriage of illustrations and text to create a perfect picture book.  The poetic text begins “In November, the earth is growing quiet” and goes on to explain how nature is shutting down for the winter.  Rylant addresses birds, plants, trees, and farm animals.  Fall food including the Thanksgiving, not mentioned by name, is discussed in the context of a family meal.  The book concludes with “In November, at winter’s gate, the stars are brittle...and the world has tucked her children in, with a kiss on their heads, till spring.”  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Sayre, April Puley.  DIG WAIT LISTEN: A DESERT TOAD’S TALE.
    Illus by Barbara Bash.  New York:  Greenwillow, 2001.  32p.  0-688-16614-8; hb.,
    $15.95   0-688-16615-6; lib.bdg., $15.89.  00-032111   Gr. 1-4+    E

    Bash uses pen and ink with watercolors to illustrate this picture book about desert animals.  Sayre shares the sounds made by the animals; a scorpion crawls, “skitter, scratch!”  Or the gila woodpecker goes “tap, tap, tap!”  Other animals are a herd of peccaries, kangaroo rat, and rattlesnake.  After introducing the other animals, Basho focuses on the toad after it rains.  The toad lays eggs that hatch into hundreds of tiny toads.  Later, when the desert becomes dry, the toad digs deep into the earth to wait for the sound of rain again.  Since this book is about deserts in the southwest, it will be a welcome addition to school and public libraries where biomes are studied.  This book focuses on listening for sounds that animals make and the sound of the rain that is a necessary ingredient for life in a desert.  This is an excellent scientific picture book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Schnur, Steven.  SPRING: AN ALPHABET ACROSTIC.  Illus. by Lesliei Evans.
    New York:  Clarion, 1999.  32p.   0-395-82269-6; hb., $15.00      PreS-Gr. 3       E

     Hand colored linoleum block prints add to the text in explaining signs of spring.  An acrostic means that each letter of a word provides the first letter of another word.  The first acrostic uses the word April to make this prose poem:
     "After days of
     Pouring
     Rain, the last
     Ice and snow finally
     Leave the earth."
The illustrations and acrostics are similar in Schnur's  AUTUMN (Clarion, 1997 ).  Teachers will use both to provide examples for students to write their own acrostics.  These books works as a picture book, an alphabet book, a nature book,  a poetry book, and as a puzzle book.  Both titles are highly recommended for home, school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Schnur, Steven.  SUMMER:  AN ALPHABET ACROSTIC.  Illustrated by Leslie Evans. 
    New York:  Clarion, 2001.  32p. 0-618-02372-0; hb., $15.00  PreS-Gr. 2    E   

    The hand-colored linoleum blocks add significantly to this book about summer.  The first acrostic, awning, is not an easy one, but beach, cabin, and daisy are more easily recognized.  Xeric is a word most readers will have to look up in a dictionary but the use of X to make the Roman numeral for 12 is clever.  The illustrations are a mixture of modern and times past.  The campers carry backpacks and water bottles and both campers and joggers wear modern shoes but other linoleum prints show scenes from the past.  The farm scene shows an outdated tractor and an old lighthouse guides ships into port.  The swimming hole and band shell evoke times past, while a woodpile and village Fourth of July parade are comfortable in the present and the past.  Although at times the illustrations are mixed metaphors, this book is still a good choice.  Public librarians should display this book around the Fourth of July and Memorial Day because both holidays are included.  School librarians should provide the book to teachers whose classes are studying seasons or the alphabet.  This title helps explain to primary students the variety of events that will happen from the time school is out until classes resume in the fall.  Although not as successful as the previous titles, purchase this one to round out the series.  Libraries not owning AUTUMN (1997) and SPRING (1999) need to order them.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Seuling, Barbara.  Newbold, Greg.   SPRING SONG.    San Diego: Gulliver/Harcourt,
    2001.   0-15-202317-8; hb., $16.00  99-6125    PreS-Gr. 3   E

    Spring in the mountains is shown in magnificent double page spreads created with acrylics.  The first set of double page spreads poses the question and the second set answers it.  There are questions about a bear, mole, skunk, bullfrogs, eagles, rabbits, cocoons, and people.  Groups or a leader can ask the question and listeners can answer the question in a call and response choral reading exercise.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Sierra, Judy.  WHAT TIME IS IT, MR. CROCODILE?  Illus. By Doug Cushman. San Diego, CA:  
     Gulliver Books, Harcourt Inc.  2004.  32p.  0-15-216-445-6 hb.  $16.00    Gr. K-2    E

    Mr. Crocodile lives by a strict schedule.  He has no time for distractions.  However, he has a plan to catch and eat the pesky monkeys that follow him around all day.  By the end of the day, Mr. Crocodile adjusts his attitude and decides he would  “…rather have you as friends than as food.”  His schedule for the next day shows a few revisions – most including his new monkey friends.
    The sing-song rhymes and bold, colorful illustrations make this book fun to read.  The humorous elements in the illustrations would make reading aloud a treat for classrooms and families.  The illustrations also show clocks with analog time that match Mr. Crocodile’s schedule.  Libraries will want to add this book to their collections.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Tafuri, Nancy.  WHERE DID BUNNY GO? A BUNNY AND BIRD STORY . Illus by  author. 
    New York: Levine/Scholastic, 2001.  0-439-16959-3; hb., $15.95.     PreS-Gr. 2    E

    The large watercolor and black ink illustrations combine with extra large text to create a story about woodland animals playing hide-and-seek.  The text is easy enough for emerging readers.  Teachers who want to introduce woodland animals during the winter will utilize this story.  Besides the best friends, bunny and bird, the other woodland creatures are squirrel and chipmunk.  Although the bird is not identified, it looks like a tufted titmouse.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Updike, John.  A CHILD'S CALENDAR:    Illus. by Trina Shart Hyman. New York:
    Holiday,  1999.  32p.   0-8234-1445-0 hb., $16.95.   PreS-Gr. 4    811.54   or   E.

     A poem for each month of the year is significantly enhanced by Hyman's watercolor illustrations.  Visual elements include the poem next to a panel illustration, also faced by a full color illustration.  The visual elements represent a child's point of view as the child moves through the year with his family.  The eye is drawn to the child in each illustration, and the activities of the family as well, yet the illustrations never overpower the poetry. This book was awarded the 2000 Caldecott Honor Medal.
    Sandra Imdieke, Professor, Northern Michigan University.
*  Editor's Note: Imdieke was a member of the 2000 Caldecott Committee, ALSC, ALA

Vulliamy, Clara.  SMALL.  Illus by author.  New York:  Clarion, 2001.  32p.
    0-618-19459-2; hb., $15.00.   2001-1042364     PreS      E

    Before Tom goes to Granny’s house, he packs his suitcase.  The most important item is a stuffed mouse called Small who gets left out when he repacks the suitcase.  When he is in bed at Granny’s he tries to go to sleep but thinks of Small “back at home in his bedroom, sad and lonely in the dark.”  Small can’t sleep either so he leaves the house, runs and runs in the dark until he comes to Granny’s house.  Meanwhile, Tom can’t sleep so he looks around the house and finds Small, providing a satisfactory ending.  While Tom is confused about where Small really was, listeners will have inside information about what happened and can enjoy the inside joke.  This is a special picture book that can be read time after time at bedtime.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Waldherr, Kris.  HARVEST.  Illus by author.  New York: Walker, 2001.  32p.
    0-8027-8792-4 hb. $15.95  0-8027-8793-2; lib.bdg., $16.85    2001-026550     K- Gr. 3     E

   The soft muted watercolor and gouache illustrations on the end papers are used to frame the individual pictures.  In most cases, the words in different type are reproduced in the illustrations on the opposite page.  Some of the pages are double-page spreads.  One discordant note is on the page where the text says that the girl is plucking herbs like sweet basil and dill but the illustration shows her picking pink daisies or asters.  The illustrations on the opposite page show either sunflowers or black-eyed susans that are mentioned in the text.  Otherwise, this is an acceptable gardening book that begins with planting and ends with a harvest moon and “time to rest” in bed with a cat.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Walton, Rick.  BUNNY DAY:  TELLING TIME FROM BREAKFAST TO BEDTIME.
    Illus by Paige Miglio.  New York:  Harper, 2002.   32p.  0-06-029183-4; hb., $15.95
    0-06-029184-2; lib.bdg., $15.89   00-054061   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    This title is a companion book to Walton's SO MANY BUNNIES: A BEDTIME ABC AND COUNTING BOOK (Harper, 2000) and ONE MORE BUNNY (Harper, 1998).   The illustrations cover all double page spreads except for a small box containing the four rhyming lines made up of two couplets.  Readers learn what the bunnies will be doing each hour from eight in the morning to eight at night.  This is a delightful way to help youngsters learn to tell time although there is no numerical representation; just the word representing the numeral.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Warner, Sunny.  THE MOON QUILT.   Boston:  Lorraine/Houghton, 2001.  32p.
    0-0618-05583-5; hb., $15.00   00-032007   Gr 1-4   E

    An old woman dreams about her late husband, works on her quilt, and plants pumpkins and flowers.  When Halloween time comes she makes pies for neighborhood children.  During winter the plants are gone and the quilt is finished.  Her work is done.  Without using the word death, there is no doubt what has happened and readers are happy for the woman and her reunion with her husband.  This book could be comforting to families who have a religion as well as those who do not.  One jarring note is the cat, which appears from the beginning to the end of the book.  A question raised by readers could be how the cat came to be with the couple at the end of the book.  Was the cat sacrificed like animals in cultures where animals and servants were forced to accompany their owners in death?  Perhaps this is a case of having too much prior knowledge.  This title, for readers of all ages, would make a good alternative for a sympathy card, a memorial gift for a school or public library.  It is of special interest to quilting groups because of the use of quilting in the illustrations.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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Opposites

Barner, Bob.  PARADE DAY: MARCHING THROUGH THE CALENDAR YEAR. 
    Illus by the author.  New York: Holiday, 2003.  32p.  0-8234-1690-9; hb., $16.95
    2002-068916     PreS-Gr. 1     E

    There is a rhyming couplet for every month via double-page spreads.  “January 1 begins a new calendar year./Watch the Rose Bowl Parade and give a big cheer.”  The collage illustrations are lively and the colors are bright.  The months with information about activities that happen during them are presented at the end of the book in a double-page spread.  Directions for making a calendar, and information about various calendars around the world, and the “Thirty days hath September” rhyme conclude the book.  Add this informative picture book to public libraries, preschool and primary school libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Bridwell, Norman.  CLIFFORD'S OPPOSITES.  Illus. by the author.  New York:
    Scholastic, 2000.  14p.   0-439-15000-0; bd. bk., $3.95      PreS      BB

     Clifford is a puppy, not a big red dog.   Instead there is a big white dog with gray spots who shares opposites with the famous red dog.  Clifford is small and his friend is big.  Other opposites are slow/fast, last/first, wet/dry, indoors/outdoors, awake/asleep.  This  satisfying and informative board book is one of eight that feature Clifford.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Fraser, Mary Ann.  I. Q. GOES TO SCHOOL.   New York: Walker, 2002.  323p. 
    Illus by author.  0-8027-8813-0; hb., $15.95  0-8027-8814-9; lib.bdg., $16.85 
    2001-056782   K-Gr. 2     E

    This picture book is divided into months of a school year in Mrs. Furber’s class.  The main character is a rat named I. Q. who is the class pet.  However, I. Q. doesn’t want to be the class pet, he wants to be a student.  As the children learn, so does I. Q.  When the children learn the alphabet, so does I. Q.  He has trouble using the scissors and the crayons are too big so he uses finer paints instead.  When they go to recess, he exercises on his wheel.  Every week when the Student of the Week is chosen, I. Q. hopes to be chosen.  Finally, when he learns to write, I. Q.  puts his name on a slip of paper and puts it in the Student-of-the-Week box.  The pencil, gouache, and pen illustrations  make I. Q. a sympathetic and charming main character and add dimension to the story.  This book is a first purchase for kindergarten and first grade classes and is very useful when studying the months.  It is also good for a review of what was learned during the last year.  The clever ending opens the book up for a sequel which will be eagerly awaited.  Purchase for school and public libraries.    
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Inkpen, Mick.  KIPPER'S BOOK OF OPPOSITES.  San Diego: Red Wagon/Harcourt, 1999. 16p.  
    0-15-202297-X;    bd.bk. $4.95    0-15-200668-0; pb., $6.00    95-155197   PreS-K       BB

    Eight pairs of opposites are introduced by Kipper, the dog seen on Nick Jr./Nickelodeon.  The concepts are clear and even humorous. Kipper has a new ball to portray new and a pile of balls that are deflated to represent old.  The ball that was in the picture to show new is in Kipper's mouth and some of the air is already out of it.  Children ages 1-3 will find  the illustrations understandable and funny. Add this board book to personal, day care, and public library board book collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Murphy, Stuart. THE GREATEST GYMNAST OF ALL.  Illus by Cynthia Jabar.
    MathStart Series.  New York:  HarperCollins, 1998.  40p.   0-06-027609-6,
    lib bdg. $14.89.    0-06-027608-8 hb,  $14.95   0-06-44678-X, pb.
    $4.95    97-51273    PreS-Gr. 3      E

     Zipping, zooming Zoe, the greatest gymnast of all will leave you dizzy learning spacial opposites the way she teaches the lesson.  She may be a girl of few words, but Zoe has an effective style.  She makes learning her lesson as easy as falling off the balance beam.  The illustrations are bright, bold and electric.  After Zoe wins the championship cup, adults and kids are offered further suggestions to reinforce the concept of opposite.  Also listed are activities that will help extend the concept into a child's everyday life.  It also includes a short bibliography of titles which include similar concepts presented in Murphy's book.  A fun addition to any collection of easy concept books.
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

OPPOSITES.  First Discovery, Look-Inside series.  New York: Scholastic Cartwheel,
    2001.   10p.  0-439-35592-3; bd.bk., $4.95  PreS   BB

    Opposites are revealed by lifting the flaps in this board book.  A boy holds a gift in front of him. When the flap is opened he is holding it behind him.  A child crawls under a chair.  When the flap is lifted, the child is sitting “above--on it.”   There is one questionable set of opposites that could prove dangerous to a preschooler.  A child climbs up to the third and top rung of a stepladder to show top and bottom.  Nevertheless the ten opposites are shown by cleverly using lift-the-flaps.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Pare, Roger. OPPOSITES.  Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens Publishing, 2001.
    ybog, 0-8368-2846-1; $5.99 hb.    PreSc-Gr. 2    E 

    Great title for a lap-sit audience. Each two-page spread has two opposites described in a single sentence for each. The "opposite" words are in large bold print.  The illustrations no doubt do a better job of clearly defining the opposites than the text. One set of opposites offered by Pare leaves some doubt in the adult mind: "fire and water".  The other concepts in the book are easy to grasp and the illustrations totally engaging. The author thoughtfully includes two web sites where a parent can go to gather further backup for a subject that is sure to appeal to a toddler or preschooler.  So.......what is the opposite of fire???
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Spowart, Robin.  INSIDE, OUTSIDE CHRISTMAS.  Illus by the author.  New York:
     Holiday, 1999.  unp.  0-8234-1370-5; lib.bdg., $15.95.   97-41956    PreS-Gr. 2     E

     Each double spread contains 2 rhyming gerunds preceded with the word "Inside"  (left hand page) and "Outside" (right hand page).  Beginning readers can take their clues from the illustrations because each gerund is explained by the illustrations which pertain to Christmas activities that take place " inside" or "outside" the family home of these adorable mice.  Inside mother and child mouse are making cookies, "Inside cooking" and outside they are looking at toys through a store window "Outside looking."   Primary teachers will use this book during holiday time to introduce opposites and "ing" words and to stimulate students to generate more "ing" words.  Beginning readers will enjoy "reading" a picture book by themselves.  School and public libraries should place this versatile holiday book high on their want lists.
    Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Tullet, Herve'  NIGHT DAY: A BOOK OF EYE-CATCHING OPPOSITES.  Boston: Little,  1999.  
     144p.   0-316-84244-3; hb., $14.95.    98-35357     Gr. K-3            E

     Originally published in France, this book uses die cut holes to reinforce the concept of synonyms and antonyms.  There are over 30 opposites including  round/square, black and white/color, hot/cold, light/shadow, order/disorder, boat/airplane,  leaving,/returning, everything/nothing.  The pages are a bit stiffer than usual to protect the holes in the pages.  Most books of opposites are for preschoolers and kindergartners but this book can be enjoyed by primary students as well.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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The Senses, Five

Davis, Patricia A.  BRIAN'S BIRD.   Illus by Layne Johnson.  Morton Grove, IL:
    Whitman, 2000. 32p.    0-8075-0881-0; hb., $14.95    99-36094   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    Scratchy is a parakeet belonging to Brian who is visually handicapped.  The bird is a birthday gift to Brian who selected the name because of how the bird felt on his hand.  Scratchy becomes numero uno in Brian's life when he bonds and then learns to talk.  Brian's nemesis is Kevin, his brother who is often careless.  The straw that breaks the camel's back, however is when Kevin leaves the door open and Scratchy flies away.  Davis wrote a simple but effective story that offers the reader insight into the world of blindness to gain understanding for the skills of the blind.  Davis manages to inject humor, which along with Johnson's bright and bold illustrations, prove that even young boys can work together to solve a problem and this time it is sibling teamwork that saves the day--and Scratchy.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

McQuade, Jacqueline.  TOUCH THE KITTY.  Illus by author.  New York: Scholastic
    Cartwheel, 2002.  10p.  0-439-33942-1; bd.bk., $6.99.     PreS     BB    PAULIN’S PICKS

    This sturdy board book has a SOFT nose on the front cover that can be touched. Within the book there are other things to touch: a tongue, paw pads, a rubber ball, and a woven basket.   The touch pads are recessed and exceedingly well captured within the thick pages so they won’t come out with constant use at home, in public libraries, or IN day care centers.  The expressions on the yellow tiger cat are very expressive.  This is an early way to learn about the sense of touch.  Don’t miss this board book!
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Reiser, Lynn.  MY DOG TRUFFLE.  Illus by author.  New York: Greenwillow/Harper,
    2001.  20p.  0-688-16875-2; hb., $9.95    98-050913  PreS-Gr.1   E

    This lift-the-flap book is told in the first person by the owner of a dog named Truffle who goes into the garden.  The pages on the left all have the same message, “What did Truffle hear? See? Smell? Taste? Feel?  On the page across from the text, Truffle is shown but he is cut into five strips.  Under each strip is the answer to the question.  This is a good book for emerging readers because of the repetition of the question as well as the picture that accompanies the answer.  For example the answer to the first question is that “Truffle heard a woodpecker.” Accompanying this sentence is a picture of a woodpecker.  The simple sentences are easy to read with the help of a picture that functions as a rebus although it is in addition to, rather than in the place of, the word.  This book can also be used by primary and ESL teachers to help students create and understand simple sentences.  It is also a must purchase for primary teachers who are teaching the senses and would make a good title to place in a classroom center with paper and pencil for students to create their own one word or sentence answers or create an entire book of their own.  Or teachers may choose to make books with a whole class, either a class book or individual books.  The strips are study enough to withstand repeated lifting.  Purchase this versatile book for preschool, home, school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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Shapes

 Dotlich, Rebecca.  WHAT IS ROUND?  Photos by Maria Ferrari.  New York:
    HarperFestival, 1999. 24p.   0-694-01208-4; hb., $9.95    98-07040    PreS-Gr. 1     E

     This title "circumferences" interesting and ordinary round objects in our world.  Dotlich teaches two-year-olds through early primary children to identify round items by using examples such as coins, a globe, the moon, a melon, a cookie, a clock...and even a button on the belly!  This fun filled book isi filled with brilliant colors and sharp photographs.  It is simple, precise, and teaches a lesson with creativity.  It is a valuable addition to an easy-read collection of concept books and it is something everyone should get a-round to looking at.
    Charlotte Oshe, Children's Assistant, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Dotlich, Rebecca Kai. WHAT IS SQUARE?  Photos by Mria  Ferrari.  New York:
    HarperFestival, 1999.  unp.   0-694-01207-6; hb., $9.95    98-71866     PreS-Gr.1     E

    The engaging rhyme doesn't miss a beat and together with clear, colorful photos of square  objects, it teaches the concept of squares in an effortless manner.  The photos are so realistic against their backgrounds that tidy people will want to pick up the cold cube of ice and wipe up the drip and hungry people want to eat the caramels, crackers, and brownie.  Readers are even enticed to read a square book about round.  Daycare centers, primary schools, and public libraries should not miss this book, or the companion book, WHAT IS ROUND?
      Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Emberley, Ed.  ED EMBERLEY’S DRAWING BOOK OF TRUCKS AND TRAINS .
    Boston:  Little, 2002.  32p.  0-316-23898-8; hb., $15.95  0-316-23786-8; pb.,
    $6.95  K-Gr. 2   741.2

    Using his successful formula, Emberley shows how simple lines and shapes  create old and new engines, a variety of train cars, a station, a trolley, pick-up trucks pulling a variety of boats and campers, vans, and heavy trucks.  The last page in incongruous because it shows people playing sports, cats, birds, and expressive faces.
Nevertheless, this is important for those who love trucks and trains.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Glaser, Higashi.  HELLO KITTY HELLO SHAPES.  Illus. by Higashi Glaser.  New York:
    Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2003.  25 p.  0-8109-4229-1 hb.  $12.95    PreS-Gr.1   E
    
    Hello Kitty envisions the many shapes that can be seen in her everyday life and begins to imagine what else she can do with them.  The last two pages in this book are made of cardboard and contain punch out stencils of various shapes.  The concept of introducing children to various shapes and then encouraging them to use imagination to make a picture based on a particular shape is fine, but this particular book would not stand up to classroom use.  It might generate ideas, but the stencil shapes would need to be reproduced out of a heavier material if they were to be used by a group of children.  The illustrations are colorful, but the language is not consistent for a primary reader and it lacks the rhythm to be an effective read aloud book.
    Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Library Board of Directors

Holm, Sharon.  ZOE'S HATS:  A BOOK OF COLOR AND PATTERNS.  Illus. by Sharon Holm. 
    Honesdale, PA:  Boyds Mills Press, 2003.  32 p.  ISBN: 1-5907-8042-6; hb., $13.95.  PreK  E

        Zoe is a cheerful red-headed little girl, who obviously enjoys playing dress-up.  Her hats are all different styles, colors, and patterns, and she does love modeling them.  The last three pages group the hats and ask the reader to identify the colors and patterns.  The brightly colored illustrations feature Zoe’s head and shoulders, and most of all, her hats.  A young child will smile with Zoe and learn to name colors and patterns, such as zig-zag, flowery, polka-dots, and plaid.  I suspect that Kindergarteners will quickly be bored with this book.
    Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Library Board of Directors

Mother Goose.  HEY DIDDLE DIDDLE.  Illus. by Jeanette Winter.  San Diego: 
    Red Wagon/Harcourt, 1999.  24 p.  0-15-202133-7 bd.bk. $4.95   PreS-K    BB

       Winter's illustrations are child friendly and capture the essence of this nursery rhyme.  This book can also be used to reinforce the concept of lines and shapes, because the moon, the plate, buttons, and the cat's head are perfectly round.  The spoon, spots on the cow, and all the eyes are oval.  There are also lines and stars.  This board book can provide an excellent first experience with a nursery rhyme at home, nursery school, public library, or kindergarten.  This is a worthy addition to any board book collection.
        Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Murphy, Stuart J. CIRCUS SHAPES.  Illus. by  Edward Miller.  MathStart Series.
     New York:  HarperCollins, 1998.  40p.   0-06-027436-0; hb., $14.95
     0-06-027437-9; lib.bdg.,  $15.89   0-06-446713-9; pb., $4.95     96-35992    PreS-Gr. 1       E

     A fun way to learn shapes is to listen to this rhyming poem about a circus.  What child doesn't love a circus.  Murphy's book could be used as a beginning reader also.  The pictures are large and uncluttered and the printing is very large. One really gets the feeling of a big circus.  The shapes are presented in a charming way and finally the child is asked to find as many shapes as he can.  The last two pages list many activities adults can do with children to reinforce the concept of  shapes.  Lots of good ideas here.  Add this to your concept book collection.
    Carol Kloskowski; volunteer,  Central School, Munising Public Schools, Munising, MI

Schlein, Miriam.  ROUND AND SQUARE.  Illus. by Linda Bronson.  Greenvale, NY: 
    Mondo, 1999.  unp.  1-57255-719-2; hb., $15.95     PreS-Gr.2    516  or  E

     This rhyme is about everyday things like balls and plates that are round and things like boxes and rooms that are square and bears, pears, hares that are not square.  Readers learn that "A straight line is a line/that doesn't curve and doesn't bend.   It can have an end, /but it just can't bend."   Collections needing more books about shapes should consider this one.
     Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

SHAPES.  First Discovery, Look-Inside series.  New York: Scholastic Cartwheel, 2001.
    10p.  0-439-29729-X; bd.bk., $4.95    PreS     BB

    This is an ambitious shape book for preschoolers.  In addition to the usual square, circle, triangle, and rectangle, children can lift-the-flap to find what’s inside a cube, and learn about spheres, cylinders, cones, and rectangular prisms.  Although the concepts are sophisticated, the shapes are clearly labeled.  The book ends on a preschool note, putting the shapes together to make funny faces.
     Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Ziefert, Harriet.  SQUAREHEAD.  Illus by Todd McKie.  Boston:  Lorraine/Houghton,
    2001.  32p.  0-618-08378-2; hb., $16.00.  00-057508    PreS-Gr. 2   E

    This title works on two levels.  Ziefert’s title is a shape book in which children can identify round and square shapes but it is also about seeing the bigger picture where others different from ourself have validity.  Snowballs make George shiver and he finds wheels annoying.   George, a squarehead, only likes square things like himself and decides that the world is square.  He even has square dreams.  Then one night he dreams of outer space where there are round planets and a round earth.  In the morning George decides that the sun is also round and that maybe “Round is awesome.”   Because this book is written on two levels, it is a double value for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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Stories in Rhyme

Applet, Kathi.  THE ALLEY CAT’S MEOW .  Illus by Jon Goodell.  San Diego:
    Harcourt, 2002.  32p.  0-15-201980-1; hb., $16.00  2001-003966  Gr. 1-4+  E

    The cool cats pictured in these oil and acrylic illustrations will appeal to the Ginger Rogers set as well as older children.  The rhyme introduces a dapper male cat, compete with cane when “His train pulled in the station/on the southeast side of town./at a boogie-woogie juke joint /called the Alley Cat’s Meow.”  Miss Ginger, who arrived on the Catanooga Choo-Choo, was “jazzy, she was snazzy, /she was my oh my oh my.”   The pair dance through the pages and dance into the hearts of readers as they cancan in Paree and do the tarantella in Brazil.  Readers of all ages will remember Red and Ginger and their     rhythm.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Apelt, Kathi.  COWBOY DREAMS:  SLEEP TIGHT, LITTLE BUCKAROO .
    Illus. by Barry Root.  New York:  Harper, 1999. unp.  0-06-027763-7; hb., $14.95.
    0-06-027764-5; lib.bdg., $14.89    98-18316   PreS-Gr.2    E

     This rhyme is about a boy who goes to bed and dreams while La Luna shines.  The boy rides his palomino, also called La Luna, and joins the cowboys singing around the campfire. He goes to sleep in his bedroll and dreams cowboy dreams.  This is a nice book for any small child who is going through the cowhand stage.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Appleford, Annie.  M IS FOR MITTEN: A MICHIGAN ALPHABET.  Poetry by
    Kathy-jo Wargin.  Illus. by Michael G. Monroe.  Chelsea, MI:  Sleeping Bear Press, 1999.  
    unp.  1-886947-73-2; hb.,   $15.95   99-33497     Gr. K-4      E   or    917.74

     Capital and small letters are given on each single or double page spread in conjunction with explanatory text.   A poem is incorporated into illustrations which cover about 3/4 of the page or pages.  Considering that the poems and text were written by different people, they work well with each other and with the illustrations to make a unified whole.   Maintaining a rhyme scheme while providing meaningful information is not easy and the result is informative and pleasing.  Perhaps this is because the total information imparted is not due solely to the poetry.   Some alphabet books are strained for difficult letters like Q,  X, and Y  but the choices for these letters are natural.  Q is for Henry Ford's first car, the Quadricycle; X marks the spot because thousands of ships have sunk in the Great Lakes; and Y is for yachts especially, the Chicago-Mackinac Yacht Race.  There are three products mentioned by name, Jiffy mix, Kellogg's Frosted Flakes, and Vernor's Ginger ale.  A is for Apples because the apple blossom is the state flower.  Because only a sentence is given, Appleford could have added the word agriculture because Michigan is known for a wide range of crops like navy beans, sugar beets, corn, and wheat among others.  This would not have been the only letter representing two concepts; for example, P has a painted turtle and the Petoskey stone, the official stone.  Cherries are another crop that represents a letter.   F could have been used for farming but it was devoted to President Gerald Ford.  This choice may have been unfortunate because the text says that he "represented Michigan in Congress for 24 years."  Had Ford been a Senator, this would have been accurate, but technically a Congressman represents a specific district, not the whole state.  This is a minor flaw that should not keep this book from being purchased for school, public, and home libraries.  Because it has lots of information about the state that is portrayed in a pleasing manner, the book will be purchased by libraries in other states to support a curriculum that includes the study other states.  All Michigan fourth grade teachers will want their own copies of this book for use while studying Michigan history.  HIGHLY RECOMMENDED..
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center

Arquette, Kerry.  WHAT DID YOU DO TODAY?   Illus by Nancy Hayashi. New York: 
    Harcourt, 2002.  32p.  0-15-201424-4; hb., $16.00.  98-17230   PreS-Gr. 1   E

    The question is the same on each of the double pages, only the name of the animal is different.  The animals are: dog, cat, pig, chick, hen, bunny, spider, bee, bear, ant, fish, bird, and owl.  The question is “What did you do today, little dog?/What did you do today?“  The answer is a rhyme that is not a couplet but a triplet and is followed by the same sentence, “That’s what I did today.”  The book ends by asking the question of a child who changes the pattern to four lines and ends with “Good Night,” making this a good read aloud at bedtime.  The text is much better than the childlike watercolor and color pencil illustrations.  Read this one aloud.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center

Ashman, Linda.  BABIES ON THE GO.  Illus by Jane Dyer.  San Diego: Harcourt,
    2003.  32p.  0-15-201894-8; hb., $16.00     2002-006310     PreS-Gr. 1      E

    Each two pages contains a rhyming couplet that shares information about how human or animal babies ride.  But no matter how their mother’s keep them moving “babies always ride with love.”  The last page contains twenty small pictures of the animal babies along with their name to make sure they are identified properly.  Most of them are easy but the labels for crocodile, snow monkey, chimpanzee help readers to be precise about the animal names.  Adults may wish to read this page to themselves first before reading the book with children.  Those familiar with Dyer’s soft watercolors will appreciate how she portrays the animal babies and their mothers.  This book is charming and informative. 
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Ashman, Linda.  CASTLES, CAVES, AND HONEYCOMBS.  Illus by
    Lauren Stringer.  San Diego:  Harcourt, 2001.  32p.   0-15-202211-2;
    hb., $16.00  99-50801   PreS-Gr. 3   E     PAULIN’S PICKS

    Acrylic illustrations surrounded by a white background show that "Many places make a home.”   Half of a couplet appears on each page but sometimes the second part of the couplet is a double page spread.   The home is named in the couplet but the animals that live there are only shown in the illustration making the book interactive with the reader who will enjoy identifying the animals by name.  Some of the twenty-six homes are:  honeycomb, web, dune, cocoon, den, and human home.  The total effect is informative and cozy.  Purchase for preschools, home, school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Barack, Marcy.  SEASON SONG.  Illus by Thierry Courtin.  Growing Tree series,
    level  1.  New York HarperFestival, 2002.  24p.  0-694-01567-9; hb., $9.95.
    2001-1092493   PreS-Gr. 2    BB   or   E

    This book is a hybrid, a cross between a picture book and a board book.  The length is shorter, the pages are thicker than in a picture book, and the size is larger than a board book but the pages are not as thick or as spill-proof as pages in a board book.
    This series provides a good transition between the two formats.  The rhyme in this title moves through the seasons, accompanied by illustrations that show a boy and a girl engaged in activities related to the text.  There is gutter loss in illustrations that are not equal to the text.  Still, the rhyme is catchy and will be enjoyed by children when read aloud to them.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Barner, Bob.  PARADE DAY: MARCHING THROUGH THE CALENDAR YEAR.  
    Illus by the author.  New York: Holiday, 2003.  32p.  0-8234-1690-9; hb., $16.95
    2002-068916     PreS-Gr. 1     E

    There is a rhyming couplet for every month via double-page spreads.  “January 1 begins a new calendar year./Watch the Rose Bowl Parade and give a big cheer.”  The collage illustrations are lively and the colors are bright.  The months with information about activities that happen during them are presented at the end of the book in a double-page spread.  Directions for making a calendar, and information about various calendars around the world, and the “Thirty days hath September” rhyme conclude the book.  Add this informative picture book to public libraries, preschool and primary school libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Barrett, Mary Brigid.  SNOW BABY.  Illus by Eve Chwast. New York:  Harcourt/Red
    Wagon, 1998.  12p    0-15-201054-8; bd.bk., $5.95.  96-075966.   PreS- K    BB.

    Barrett's book is a must for young children who live in snow country.  Grandma comes to take baby out to play in the snow.  Baby is bundled up and ventures out into the snow-covered world with Gram. They climb up hills, make snow angels, go sledding, and baby plops in a drift.  At days end, the wind howls outside, while baby and Mama are nice and warm inside, blowing goodby kisses to Gram.  Rhyme, repetition, and bright bold illustrations make this a fun board book to read again and again. This book is bound to be a favorite of babies to preschool children who live in areas like the Upper Peninsula.
    Betty Karbon, Munising School and Public Library, Munising, MI.

Bateman, Teresa.  FARM FLU.  Illus by Nadine Bernard Westcott.  Morton Grove, IL:
    Whitman, 2001.  32p.  0-8075-2274-0; hb., $15.95.  00-008158  PreS-Gr. 1    E

    This is a charming rhyme about a boy who is left alone on the farm while his mother drives off in her pickup.  When each group of animals come down with the flu, he says “I knew just what my mom would do if it were me who had the flu.”  Of course when the animals enjoy coddling and extra TV beyond their illness, he also does what mom would do.  At the end when the narrator comes down with the flu, the animals help him.  The only jarring note is that the story is modernized by having a female farmer and a boy in tennis shoes and modern clothes but the farm is still the old fashioned type (hens in individual nests, one cow, one donkey, turkeys, pigs, and sheep) familiar to “Old MacDonald” readers.  The book is similar to Rhonda Greene’s BARNYARD SONG (Atheneum, 1997).
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Bateman, Teresa. HUNTING THE DADDYOSAURUS.  Illus. by Benrei Huang.
    Morton Grove, IL: Whitman, 2002. 32p.   0-8075-1433-0; hb., $15.95
    2001-004316     PreS-Gr. 2       E

    "Hunka-cha-hunka-cha, rooba", is the catchy chant brother and sister dinosaur spiritedly repeat as they search for their father upon his return from work.   The rhythmic verse moves cheerfully along until the final stanza, "Let's track him, attack him, and tickle him pink!" and with the serving of hot cinnamon cider it makes everything come out happily-ever-after.  Soft, shaded illustrations create the human-like characteristics in this prehistoric family and Huang's amusing details such as dino windchimes, a relic camera, and a timely license plate, heighten the appeal of the story and lead to a satisfying family adventure.  To sum it up in one word: Dino-Mite!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Bauer, Marion Dane.  IF YOU HAD A NOSE LIKE AN ELEPHANT'S TRUNK .
    Illus. by Susan Winter.  New York:  Holiday, 2001.  32p.  0-8234-1589-9; hb.,
    $16.95  00-032005   PreS-Gr. 3    E

    The watercolors show a young girl who asks questions about various parts of the bodies of animals.  The book begins "If you had a nose like an elephant's trunk...If you had feet like a fly's..."  After each thought there are several imaginative suggestions of what a person could do if they had that body part.  The highly imaginative scenes are reminiscent of scenarios in books with questions for gifted students.  In fact, students can add to the one to three suggestions with those of their own.  The book can be used as a bedtime story because it ends with her in bed with her dog as her parents look on and are pleased "Because you are made just to be you.  And we're so glad!"  Counselors can use the book as a bibliotherapy tool to stimulate discussions about why children should be pleased with themselves.  The humor in the book keeps it from being heavy-handed with those students.  "If you had a tail like a monkey's, you could swing from your grandmother's antique chandelier."
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Boelts, Maribeth.  LULLABY LULLABOOK.  Illus by Bruce Whatley.  Harper
    Growing  Tree series, Level N.  New York: HarperFestival, 2002.  14p.
    0-694-01593-8;  bd.bk., $5.95.  PreS   BB    PAULIN’S PICKS

    This is a first choice board book.  There are short verses for six animals and one human child.  What is different about this read-aloud bedtime story is the last word in each verse.  The Mama dove “sings her babe a lulla-coo.”  Other animals are cat (lulla-purr), owl (lulla-hoo), horse (lulla-neigh), trout (lulla-bubble), and cow (lulla-moo).  There are six age levels in this preschool series, and N stands for newborn.  Purchase this for personal giving, preschools, and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Bond, Michael PADDINGTON BEAR GOES TO MARKET.  Illus. by R.W. Alley.
    New York:  HarperCollins, 1998.  14p.    0-694-00891-5; bd.bk., $5.95    PreS     BB

    With only one sentence on a page this happy, lively Paddington board book is sure to please any little tyke who would eagerly grab for its sturdy pages.  The illustrations are filled with expressive characters and the detailed touches enhance the appeal of the book. It is skillfully done to hold the abbreviated attention of the beholder.  It is market day, so why not follow Paddington Bear to Portobello Market and join him for a special treat with his friend, Mr. Gruber?
        Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Bono, Mary.  UGH! A BUG.  New York:  Walker, 2001.  32p.  0-8027-8799-1; hb.,
    $15.95  0-8027-8800-9; lib.bdg., $16.85   2001-045547   PreS-Gr. 3     E

    Color pencil over watercolor washes and plastic clay bugs, along with rhyming text, exhort children not to be afraid of bugs.  Readers are asked rhetorical questions about what they would do if they saw a variety of bugs like beetles, ladybugs, fleas, or bumblebees.  The questions are answered about what children should do.  For example, Dragonflies are “just being nosy so don’t run for cover.”   There is gutter loss for some of the illustrations but the message is worthwhile, especially the last one which says that bugs are not happy in jars.  Purchase for school and public libraries to provide a sympathetic view of bugs.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Brooks, Bruce.  EACH A PIECE.  Illus  by Elena Pavloo.  New York:  Geringer/
     HarperCollins, 1998.  32p.  0-06-023594-2; hb., $14.95       K-Gr. 3      E   or  811

     "Each piece is a part/of more left to find" is the theme of this poem and Pavloo has chosen cut pages to express the sentiment for the pages containing this sentence.  Pavloo's Victorian valentine illustrations add a nostalgic dimension to Brooks' brief  rhyme.  After reading how the collages were created from computer valentine images, art teachers can use this as an interesting example of how computers are involved in book  illustrations.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Cabrera, Jane.  OVER IN THE MEADOW.  Illus. by author.  New York: Holiday,
    1999.  32p.   0-8234-1490-6; hb.,    $16.95      99-22683    PreS-Gr. 2    E

     The large colorful illustrations in this traditional counting song will hold the interest of children.  The song begins with one turtle and ends with ten rabbits, all of which are shown in a double page spread at the end of the book which make great patterns for flannel board  or transparency characters.  Although no music is provided in this picture book, it can be sung instead of read to children.  The pictures are large enough to be seen by a group.  The duck is similar to the one found in Cabrera's EGGSDAY (Holiday, 1999).  This book is suitable for home, preschool, daycare, and primary school libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Carr, Jan.  DAPPLED APPLES.  Illus by Dorothy Donohue.  New York:  Holiday,
    2001.   24p.   0-28234-1583-X; hb., $15.95   00-047285   K-3   E

    The cut paper collages have been layered so they achieve texture and dimension.  The vivid color of autumn appears on every page as the children pick apples and pumpkins and prepare their costumes before going trick or treating.  The simplicity of text and illustrations are perfect for preschool and primary students. The rhyme is natural and not forced.  This is a good book to read aloud at the beginning of the school year.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Carr, Jan.  FROZEN NOSES.  Illus by Dorothy Donohue.  New York: Holiday, 1999.
    unp.  0-8234-11462-0; hb.,   $15.95     98-48540     Pres-Gr. 3    E

     This catchy rhyme about ordinary winter activities like making a snowman, sledding, and skating is excellent for reading aloud to preschool and early elementary children.  Choose a few of the collage illustrations to grace your winter bulletin board or as patterns for the children to make faces or whole bodies of children in action.  All children, especially upper peninsula children, can identify with these children as they get ready to go outdoors:   "Frozen noses/ Tingly toeses/ Sniffle, snuffle Winter's Cold!/ Better Bundle!/ Quiver, shiver/ Booted, bucked/ Buttonholed"
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Collard, Sneed B.  BUTTERFLY COUNT.  Illus by Paul Kratter.  New York:  Holiday,
    2002.  32p.  0-8234-1607-0; hb., $16.95.  2001-024114   K-Gr. 4+   E

    Readers learn that the narrator, Amy, is the great-great-granddaughter of Nora Belle whose farm is now the Nora Belle Prairie Restoration Project.  Each year volunteers all over North America take part in the Fourth of July Butterfly Count and Amy and her mother go to the family farm to look for the regal fritillary, a rare butterfly.  Readers see a variety of prairie plants, animals, and best of all, butterflies.  Kratter’s watercolors provide a soft view of the prairie and butterflies.  The story ends with fireworks that remind Amy of butterflies.  While enjoying the book, readers who wish for labeled butterflies are rewarded with fourteen butterflies their common and Latin names, and an informative paragraph.  At the end of the book readers also learn about the North American Butterfly Association’s Butterfly Count including their website and snail mail address.  Guidelines for watching and attracting butterflies are given along with information about a book and pamphlet that are helpful.  This picture book would be helpful for studying conservation and/or butterflies or to celebrate the Fourth of July.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Dunn, Carolyn.  A PIE WENT BY. Illus. by Christopher Santoro.  New York:
    HarperCollins, 1999. unp.  0-06-028807-8; hb., $14.95       K-Gr. 2      E  

    If a cumulative story with internal rhyme is what is desired on the story menu, this title is certain to satiate the reader's appetite.  King Bing is off to pop the question to Queen Bea, but along the way he meets a menagerie of animal friends who, with an eye on the delectable delicacy, try to connive strategies to get the king to bend over and lose his treasure.  At last, in response to the many suggestions, King Bing, with his gratitude attitude, bows his most gallant bow and the pie slides off his head splattering over a two-page spread.  Santoro's watercolors emit an easy-going energy and along with the calorie laden recipe for King Bing's pie, this title will have its readers asking for a second serving. 
    Patricia Fittante Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
 
Dylan, Bob.  MAN GAVE NAMES TO ALL THE ANIMALS.  Illus by Scott Menchin.
    San Diego:  Harcourt, 1979,  1999.  32p.   0-15-22005-5; hb., $16.00   98-28826
    PreS-Gr. 4+  782.42    or     E

     Although no music is included, the title of the album which includes this song is given, SLOW TRAIN COMING.  Menchin treats this song like a riddle poem.  He provides two pages of  pictures to go with the first part up to the rhyme that gives a clue to the identify of the animal.  Then he includes a full picture of the animal with the refrain, "Ah, think I'll call it a ...."  The nature of Menchin's illustrations makes this a song that can be used at many grade levels, even past middle school.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director,  Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Dodd, Lynley.  SCHNITZEL VON KRUMM, FORGET-ME-NOT.  Milwaukee:
    Gareth Stevens, 1996.  32 p.  0-8368-2094.  PreS-Gr. 3    E

    This story is written in rhyme, making it fun to read.  The rhythm is great.  Poor Schnitzel von Krumm, a cute little puppy dog, seems to be getting the brush-off from his family.  They are too busy to pay much attention to him.  Small readers can relate to this theme.  He seems to compound his problems by being underfoot while the family is packing for a vacation.  The inevitable happens and poor Schnitzel gets left behind.  The illustrations are portrayed from the dog's level, giving the reader a view of the world the way he sees it.  The pictures give a feeling of movement and flow with the verse of the story.  This would be a great book to read to a group of children at story hour. Anyone with a pet would be able to understand this story and be sympathetic to the cute little dog.
    Denise Jeske, Richmond Township Library,  Palmer, Michigan

Edwards, Pamela Duncan.  ED & FRED FLEA.  Illus. by Henry Cole. New York:
    Hyperion, 1999.  unp.   0-7868-0468-8 hb., $14.00.     98-42680   PreS-Gr.2    E

    For any child who is ITCHING for a good read, this creation is a must. This book will TICKLE the funnybone!  Done in a whimsical rhyme bad flea Fred comes to realize that faking the part of a flu-y flea just doesn't cut it and true to tradition, justice wins out in the end.  Edwards does a delightful job of keeping a strong bond between the rhyming and the plot while Cole's illustrations create a perfect harmony.  The vocabulary and text are easy enough for a novice reader.  This tale would also be a super storytime selection.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

 Esbensen, BarbaraJuser.  JUMPING DAY.  Illus by Maryaonn Cocca-Leffler.
    Honesdale, PA:  Boyds Mills, 2000.  32p   1-56397-853-9; pb., $7.95.
    98-71667     PreS-Gr.2    E

     This book is full of energy.  A little girl wakes up in the morning, says hello to the sun, and jumps through her day.  It's enough to tire a parent, grandparent, or caregiver.  The girl jumps to and throughout school until it is time to jump into bed..  The acrylic, pastel, and colored pencil illustrations portray her "joie de vivre."    Introduce this book through line-a-child choral reading
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director,  Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Fernandes, Eugenia.  BUSY LITTLE MOUSE.  Illus by Kim Fernandes.
    Tonawanda,  NY:  Kids Can, 2002.  24p.  1-55074-776-2; lib.bdg., $12.95
    C2001-901525-1    PreS-Gr. 1     E

    Fimo modeling material was used to create the same little mouse that was in Fernandes’ SLEEPY LITTLE MOUSE.  (Kids Can, 2000).  A rhyme introduces eight animals.  The last of the four lines is the same for each animal: “What does the little dog (pig, sheep, cow, cat, duck, horse, mouse) say?”  It is unusual that the name of the baby animal is not used; i.e., puppy, lamb, calf, kitten, duckling, or colt.   The sound for each animal is repeated twice: “Woof! Woof!” or “Oink! Oink!”  The book ends with the little mouse going to bed.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Fudge, Charles.  YIP! SNAP! YAP!  Berkeley:  Tricycle, 2000.  24p.
    1-58246-046-9; hb.,  $14.95.     PreS-Gr.2    E

    This book is wonderful for preschool story hours, family reading at home, and reading aloud to primary graders.  The print is large enough for a group to see; the illustrations are clearly defined so the audience can enjoy the expressions on the faces of the dogs; and the audience can participate by making noises.  This book successfully involves the audience in barking, growling, munching, snoring, sniffing, snapping, panting, and scratching right up to the final chorus.  Although the rhyme is not obvious because the audience is making noises, this is not a problem.  Primary teachers can also use the book for antiphonal choral reading.  Don’t miss this one!
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

George, Kristine O'Connell.  BOOK!  Illus by Maggie Smith.  New York:  Clarion, 2001.
    unp.  0-395-98287-1; hb., $9.95.  00-065600   PreS- Gr. K   811.54   or    E

    The acrylic illustrations on stiff pages that are easy for preschoolers to turn, show a flat square gift in green wrapping paper that a small boy opens to find a book that he can turn the pages by himself and read to his toy elephant or his cat or can be read to by his mother in a chair "warm and snug."  This book could be retitled "Ode to a Book" because the rhyme is a love affair between a toddler and his book.  Curling up with a book in bed with his stuffed animal and cat is a perfect ending.  Purchase this book for libraries, day care centers, and for baby gifts.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

George, Kristine O’Connell.  LITTLE DOG AND DUNCAN.  Illus by June Otani.
    New York: Clarion, 2002.  40p.  0-618-11758-X; hb., $12.00  2001-028481
    PreS-Gr. 3    811.54

    Duncan is a big dog and Little Dog is….little.  While his family is away, Duncan comes to stay with the smaller dog and his female preschooler with Asian eyes.  The watercolor illustrations show the two dogs and girl in a variety of situations, some are humorous and some are emotional.  The poems contain easy to read vocabulary enhanced by an 18-point font.  Although Little Dog welcomes his larger friend, he draws the line at sharing his mistress’ lap.  Fans of George’s LITTLE DOG POEMS (Clarion, 1999) will appreciate this book also.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Godwin, Laura.  CENTRAL PARK SERENADE.  Illus by Barry Root.  New York:
    Cotler/Harper, 2002.  32p.  0-06-025891-8; hb., $15.95   0-06-   lib.bdg., $15.89     Gr. K-3   E

    There are lots of noises that appear two or three times in a row like beep, clip clop, and boom, so readers can join in the fun.  There is also a refrain that can be repeated by listeners, “And the pigeons coo/And the big dogs bark/And the noises echo through the park.”  This rhyming picture book tickles the senses, sight and sound.  Readers travel through Central Park (map on end papers) listening to sounds and seeing the varied activity in the park.  Besides the sounds, there is a descriptive couplet on each page.  This book celebrates the famous park.  Even without the extra interest in New York City, this book will be welcome.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Greene, Rhonda Gowler.  JAMBOREE DAY.  Illus by Jason Wolff.  New York:  
    Orchard/Scholastic, 2001.  0-434-24310-3; hb., $15.95  00-66589   PreS-Gr. 3    E

    “Deep in the jungle every middle of May/there’s a big celebration called Jamboree Day”  begins this rhyming picture book about animals who came from far and near to the jamboree.   “The first to arrive were the Cheetah twins,/bouncing to the plinking of their mandolins.”  “Ants came marching.  Eland leapt./Leopard jogged in.  Lizard crept.”  “Bands played bebop, blues, and jazz/with a toot-toot-tootie and a razzmatazz./Everyone jitterbugged, boogied, and bopped/and wiggled and jiggled till the music stopped.”   The book begs to be read aloud and the rhyme is jazzy, rollicking, and natural.  This is a first choice for school and public libraries.  Greene lives in West Bloomfield, Michigan.  Read more about her at www.rhondagowlergreene.com
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Greenfield, Eloise. WATER, WATER.  Illus. by Jan Spivey Gilchrist.  Growing Tree Series.
    New York:  HarperCollins,  1999.  24p.  0-694-01247-5 hb. $9.95.     PreS-Gr. 2    E

    What a neat, simple way to introduce the concept of water to a preschooler.  In a very few words,  Greenfield describes the many facets of water and the roles it plays in our lives. While there is no real story, the simplicity of text and the soft, full-page watercolor illustrations, tell it all. A delightful introduction to one of the basics of life.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library.  Escanaba, MI

Hayward, Linda.  IT TAKES THREE.  Illus by Robin Micihal Koontz.  Silly Millies series. 
    Beginning to Read Alone, Level 2.  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2003.    32p.  
    9-7613-2902-1; lib.bdg.,    9-7613-1798-8; pb.,   2002-011410  K-Gr. 3      ER

    Children join a circus-like Compare-A-Thon where a stork, horse, and a giraffe explain tall, taller, and tallest and a snail, slug, and sponge explain slow, slower, slowest Other comparisons are large, small, wide, long, odd, and fast.  The easy reader ends with a note to parents and tips for reading and discussion.  Children can practice reading, meet  various creatures, and learn some grammar at the same time.  Consider this rhyming book for easy reader collections in school and public libraries.  
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan 
 
Hines, Anna Grossnickle.  WHICH HAT IS THAT?  Illus by LeUyen Pham.  San Diego:    
    Harcourt, 2002.  24p.  0-15-216477-4; hb., $15.00  2001-003680    PreS-K    E

    Pen and ink and watercolors bring a girl-mouse to life.  Told in the first person, the charmer shares, in rhyme, a variety of hats.  Five times she gives hints of activities she will be engaging in while she is wearing a special hat and then asks “Which hat is that?  Readers can find the answer when the pull a tab that opens the page into a trifold.   Readers should be able to answer gardening, cooking, firefighter, tea party and favorite spacey hat.  This book is perfect for the preschool set. 
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

 Hubbard, Patricia.  TRICK OR TREAT COUNTDOWN.  Illus by Michael Lezig.
    New York: Holiday, 1999.  32p.  0-8234-1367-5; hb., $15.95       PreS-Gr.2    E

     School and public libraries will want to purchase this Halloween counting book. "One haunted house groans./ Two tall tombstones moan./Three green witches cackle,/Four dead leaves crackle."  The numbers go up to 12 and back again.  On the trip back there is only a subject and verb, "Four crackle, three cackle,/Two moan, One groans."  The characters are children dressed in costumes so readers won't be scared.  Primary teachers can use this book to reinforce
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Hubbell, Patricia.  BOUNCING TIME.  Illus. by Melissa Sweet.  New York:
    HarperCollins, 2000.  unp.   0-688-17376-4;    hb., $15.95   0-688-17377-2;
    lib.bdg.,   99-15502   PreS   E

     This is a bouncy book about bouncing.  The colorful end papers set the tone for the book and the bright colors appear on all pages beginning with a mother and little girl who are discussing bouncing.  The central question is how the child will  bounce, like a grasshopper, cricket, frog, toad, clown, puppy, cat, kangaroo, tiger, giraffe, lion, python, panda, elephant.  They even bounce on the bed at the end of this engaging rhyming book.  Large type and bright pictures make this an excellent choice for reading aloud, after which the listeners need an opportunity to practice their bouncing.  Preschools and public libraries will find this book a necessary purchase.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Kleinhenz, Sydnie Meltzer.  PLEASED TO EAT YOU.  Illus by Beth Griffis Johnson.     
    Silly Millies series.  Beginning to Read Alone, Level 1.  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2003. 
    32p.  9-7613-2909-9; lib.bdg., 9-7613-1827-5; pb.,  2002-007499    K-Gr. 2     ER

    Readers learn about carnivores, herbivores, and omnivores in a humorous way in this rhyming easy reader.  Because he is a carnivore, an alligator says to a girl, “Pleased to eat you.”  A horse won’t eat her because he is a herbivore but the bear says he is an omnivore who eats everything.  The easy reader ends with a note to parents and tips for reading and discussion.  Consider this title for easy reader collections in school and public libraries.   
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Laden, Nina.  CLOWNS ON VACATION.  New York:  Walker, 2002.  32p.
     0-8027-8780-0; hb., $16.95.  0-8027-8781-9; lib.bdg., $17.85         K-Gr. 3    E

     The gouache and photomontage illustrations in this rhyming picture book give it a bright, cheery look.  The focus of the book is what clowns do when they are on vacation.  Where do they do?  How do they get there?  Where do they stay?  What do they like?  What do they eat?  What adventures do they have?  Will they return back to the circus on time?  These questions are answered through text and illustrations.  Because almost all of the sentences are questions, the book could be used when teaching that concept in primary grades.  Teachers can also use this book for pattern writing.  The circus is a fascinating topic for children and this book is a fresh look at circus clowns.  Read this one aloud.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Lass, Bonnie and Philemon Sturges. WHO TOOK THE COOKIES FROM
    THE COOKIE JAR?  Illus by Ashley Wolff.  Boston:  Little, 2000.  32p.
    316-82016-4; hb., $14.95    99-16877    PreS-Gr. 2     E

    Wolff uses watercolor and pen to illustrate this favorite action song.  The refrain has been rewritten by Lass and Sturges.  There is even a new storyline to this book--it is the ants that take the cookies and all the animals follow the crumbs where they have a picnic of cookies with the ants.  This book has a desert theme with desert animals so will be useful when studying deserts or the southwest.  The animals in the story are skunk, mouse, raven, squirrel, rabbit, turtle, raccoon, snake, beaver, frog, and ants.  Directions for playing the game are given at the beginning of the book along with the music and lyrics.  This is a solid choice for picture book collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Lewis, Kevin.  THE LOT AT THE END OF MY BLOCK.  Illus by Reg Cartwright.
    New York:  Hyperion, 2001.  32p.  0-7868-0596-X; hb., $14.99
    0-7868-2512-X; lib.bdg., $15.49      PreS     E

    This cumulative picture book begins "This is the lot at the end of my block."  Participants are:  lot; wall; workmen; hole; pit; dump truck; shovel; bulldozer; crane; girder; welder; mixer; building; and buddy.  This book evokes audience participation from listeners.  Learning about how a building is constructed is a fortunate sidelight of this story.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Leonard, Marcia.  FAVORITE COLORS.  Photos by Dorothy Handelman.
    New York:  HarperFestival, 2001.  16p.  Hanna book series.
    0-694-01370-6; hb., $7.95    00-101106   PreS-K      E

    Although this is technically not a board book, it will appeal to the same readers.  The pages are laminated to protect them from spills and are stiff enough for young fingers to turn.  The first rhyme shows a little girl with balloons who asks what color readers like best.  Then six light-skinned but ethnically diverse, well scrubbed children give their answers.  Some of the colors worn by the children match the color they have chosen and the objects from the rhyme appear in crisp colors that children can easily identify.  The book is even more interactive because two questions appear at the end of each color, “What else is [color]?” and “What isn’t [color]?”  If the children’s clothing makes them look like fashion models, then check the back of the book to see that they are probably from Hanna Andersson’s children’s clothing company.  Purchase if you don’t mind a good book about colors that hawks advertising to parents.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Levine, Abby.  THIS IS THE TURKEY.  Illus by Paige Billin-Grye.  Morton Grove, IL:
    Whitman, 2000.  0-8075-7888-6; lib.bdg., $14.95   00-008175  PreS-Gr. 2  E

    This Thanksgiving story, told in the cadence of “The House Tht Jack Built,” begins “This is a turkey to shout about!  And Max is the one who picked it out.  This is the pan where it roasts away/ for the guests who are coming Thanksgiving Day.”  Readers are introduced to a family where Dad stirs the cranberries, an uncle brings salad greens, and an aunt provides her famous beans.  Cousins as well as neighbors come to dinner.  In the middle of this happy gathering, the turkey shoots off the platter into the aquarium but Grandma tells Max not to worry “…we have all we need because everyone’s here.” The watercolor, pencil, and ink illustrations depict an ordinary family with humor during a holiday dinner by adding an extra dimension to the text.  This satisfying holiday story is recommended for school, public, day care, and home libraries.  READ THIS ONE ALOUD!
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Lodge, Bernard.  CLOUD CUCKOO LAND.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.  unp.
    0-395-96318-4 hb. $15.00.    99-18698      Gr. K-3      E

     A trip to fantasy land.  Yewtopia, The Junkle, Hairland, Ice Cone Island. They are all stops in a zany trip to Cloud Cuckoo Land.  Ten creative destinations are included in the jaunt to this outrageous land populated by equally outrageous characters.  Done in nonsensical rhyme the reader will  find himself in places that are not on any map. Silliness is abound even in the soft pastel illustrations that are a perfect balance to the lively text.
    Patricia Fittante, Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

 Maestro, Marco and Giulio.  GEESE FIND THE MISSING PIECE:   SCHOOL TIME
    RIDDLE RHYMES
.  Illus. by Giulio Maesro.  I Can Read Series. New York:
    HarperCollins, 1999. 48p.     0-06-026220-6; hb.,   $14.95   0-06-026221-4;
    lib.bdg., $14.89     98-4151  PreS-Gr. 3        818     or     793.7      or      E

    Emerging readers can participate in these riddles because each double or single page  spread gives the riddle and then provides a phrase that has a word that rhymes with the answer.  The answer is provided on the next page.  This makes this a very meaningful and fun easy reader for beginning readers. The 22 riddles can be used by older students as models for changing standard riddles to rhymes.   This is a first purchase for elementary school and public libraries.
   Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Many, Paul. THE GREAT PANCAKE ESCAPE.  Illus. by Scott Goto.  New York:
    Walker, 2002. 32p.  0802787959; hb.,  $16.95   0-8027-8796-7;  lib.bdg., $17.85     
    2001-26587    K-Gr.3      E

    If you like the Gingerbread Boy, you will love this silly tale about a magician father who loves to cook breakfast for his hungry offspring.  He may bungle the recipe, but with the help of his magic, he cooks up a story that will satisfy the appetite of any youngster who knows what a pancake is.  The hotcakes jump off the griddle, run out the door and the children are directed to round up the runaway pancakes.  Told in simple verse, the author suggests at the end of the book that text be sung to the tune of "O, Susanna" followed by a chorus he supplies.  To keep things rolling along the illustrator adds clever and luminous pictures that magnify the story from a multitude of vantage points that will keep the reader jumping.  Pancakes become everything from traffic lights, rollerblade wheels, frisbees and umbrellas while the speech bubbles take on the same shape as the delectable flapjacks.  Nothing stops the young heroes from chasing down their magical breakfast but in the end of this fun-filled tale, when a backward spell brings all the pancakes back (but turned into goo), father offers to fry up another stack.  His thoughtful offer is rejected, however in lieu of .......FROZEN WAFFLES!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

 Mathews, Judith.  THERE'S NOTHING TO D-O-O-O-!  Illus by Kurt Cyrus. 
    San Diego:  Harcourt, 1999.  32p. 0152016473 hb. $16.00    PreS-Gr. 2      E

     How often does a parent hear the lament, "There's Nothing To Do-o-o!?"  Laloo, a playful calf, becomes discontented with the routine and mundane of daily farm life so she decides to run away. She wants something n-e-w.  There is a nice flow to the book as Matthews mixes narrative and rhyme to make things interesting.  The story is easy enough to read independently yet fulfilling enough to be enjoyed as a read-aloud.  Cyrus compliments the written word with soft delightful illustrations that will warm the hearts of farm animal lovers.  Mathews and Cyrus together show us that whether children want something n-e-w or something familiar may just depend on their
m-o-o-d.
    Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library

McGrath, Barbara Barbieri.  BE MY VALENTINE BOOK.  Illus by Frank Mazola, Jr.
    New York:  HarperFestival, 2000. 12p.  0-694-01534-2 bd.bk. $5.99  PreS+   BB

    The style of the illustrations isn’t particularly distinguished but serves the purpose because preschool readers will have no trouble identifying the cats, rabbits, and other animals in the pictures.  Each double page spread shows an adult animal hugging a baby while other babies look on or appear in the background.  The text for each spread is confined within two candy hearts by NECCO called Sweethearts.  The captions for the hearts on the hound dog page are “Let’s Kiss” and “Like this.”  The colors of the candy are typical  of the famous product.   The book is a bit larger than board book size and the illustrations and text are large enough for this book to be used with smaller story hours.   Librarians will have no trouble finding appropriate treats to share.  The back cover has lines for “To” and  “From,” making this a natural for personal giving.  Grandparents would be advised to send this board book instead of the candy.  Add this to the growing number of books that promote candy and cereal if commercialization doesn’t bother you.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Melmed, Laura Krauss.  FRIGHT NIGHT FLIGHT.  Illus. Henry Cole. New York: HarperCollins, 
    2002.  32p.  0-06-0297018; hb., $15.99    0-06-029702-6; lib.bdg. $15.89    PreS-Gr. 3    E

    This cumulative Halloween rhyme begins “The moon sails high, the wind moans low,/the Fright Night Flight is set to go!”  Told in the first person by a witch who zooms around on her “super jet-fueled broom” takes along a vampire, werewolf, ghost, monster, skeleton, and mummy.  The book ends with an illustration showing all of these creatures as trick or treaters.  This is a solid holiday selection for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Moffatt, Judith.  MAKE YOUR OWN CHRISTMAS TREATS!  New York: Scholastic    
    Cartwheel, 2002.   12p.  0-439-36219-9; bd. Bk., $6.99    PreS      BB     

    This rhyming board book includes Christmas preparations like decorating a tree and making a gingerbread house. The collage illustrations are easy for preschoolers to understand.  There is a page of 35 holographic stickers to provide personal additions to the tree or preparations including an empty plate that will provide treats for Santa.  Although the stickers are reusable, keeping them all available to new readers would be difficult for library circulation thus making this book better for personal giving than library use.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Murphy, Mary.  MY PUFFER TRAIN. Illus. by author.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin,
    1999.  32p.  0-395-97105-5 hb. $9.95.   98-47803   PreS-Gr.1    E

    Puffa puffa, choo choo.....these are the sounds the user will hear and make as
Penguin sets off for the seashore in his puffer train.  As he drives along through the countryside, he picks up all different kinds of animals.  Illustrations that are vibrant, but simple, and paired with a rhyming text, are a sure bet to keep the youngsters tooting, puffing and choo--ing with each turn of the page.  Children will recognize themselves in Penguin and will be quoting repeatedly, "Come again soon!"  Tomorrow?
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Neitzel, Shirley.  I’M NOT FEELING WELL TODAY.  Illus by Nancy Winslow Parker.
    Greenwillow, 2001.  32p.  0-688-17380-2; hb., $15.95  0-688-17381-0; lib.bdg.,
    $15.89   00-021917   K-Gr. 3.  E

    Fans of Neitzel and Winslow who liked THE JACKET I WEAR IN THE SNOW  (HC 1995) and THE BAG I’M TAKING TO GRANDMA’S (HC, 1989) will find the format similar, tied together with the checkerboard frame for the front cover.  The watercolors accented with pencil and black pen are perfect for the text and enhance it by providing rebuses once the words, like box of tissues, blanket, pillow, and [finger] puppets, have been introduced.  Ten essential items are needed  “since I’m not feeling well today.”  The cumulative story would be fine by itself but the ending elevates it to a new level by interjecting humor and surprise.  After the whole litany of things needed by someone who is ill, the boy jumps out of bed once he learns that a storm has caused school to be closed.  The final dance of the boy on the last page accompanies the text “That is too bad! Hurrah!  Hurrah!  I’m glad I’m feeling well today!
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center

Neitzel, Shirley.  OUR CLASS TOOK A TRIP TO THE ZOO.  Illus by Nancy Winslow
    Parker.  New York: Greenwillow/Harper, 2002.  32p.  0-688-15543-X; hb., $15.95
    0-688-15544-8; lib.bdg., $15.89   2001-023670   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    This is the eighth cumulative rebus picture book in rhyme created by Neitzel, a Michigan author, and Parker.  The first title was THE DRESS I’LL WEAR TO THE PARTY.  (Greenwillow, 1992).  The illustrations, created in watercolor, black ink, and color pencils, introduce each item that was left behind in various places at the zoo by the narrator.  The items are shown again as rebuses in the text.  The humorous book ends “I wish I could be a zookeeper, too,/ and spend every day right here at the zoo!”   To their credit, the adults do not have a horrified look on their faces.  Besides their function as picture books, the books are also valuable for emerging independent readers.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Nikola-Lisa, W.  TO HEAR THE ANGELS SING: A CHRISTMAS POEM .
    Illus. By Jill Weber.  0-8234-1627-5; hb., $16.95  2001-039305    PreS-Gr.    232
 
    The watercolor illustrations for this rhyme about the Nativity are very expressive and child appealing.   The double-page spread showing joy is very “joyful,” with humans, sheep and donkeys joining in the joy.  The text reads “Behold the joy of Bethlehem,/Bethlehem, Bethlehem,/ on this first Christmas morn.   This is a special Nativity book and will be a welcome addition to holiday collections in public and home libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Nolan, Janet.  THE ST. PATRICK'S DAY SHILLELAGH.  Illus. Ben F. Stahl.  Morton Grove, IL:
    Albert Whitman & Company, 2002.  unp.  0-8075-7344-2  hb; $15.95    Gr. 2-6   FIC       
   
    Before leaving Ireland for America to escape the potato famine, young Fergus cuts off a branch of his favorite blackthorn tree.  On the ship over, he carves this branch into a shillelagh.  On each St. Patrick's Day, he tells the story of the potato famine and his journey to America.  The shillelagh is passed down to his descendants who keep Fergus's story alive.  This book is an excellent starting point for discussions on family oral traditions as well as family
treasures which teachers and parents will want to add to their library.  The acrylic illustrations add to the vibrant story.
    Jolene Hetherington, Teacher, Munising Public Schools, 12 years of teaching experience 

Parker, Toni Trent.  SNOWFLAKE KISSES AND GINGERBREAD SMILES.  
    Photos by Earl Anderson.  New York: Scholastic Cartwheel, 2002.  14p. 
    0-439-33872-7;  hb., $6.95.   PreS-Gr. 1    E

    This rhyming book begins on the first end papers and ends on the last end papers.  The stiff pages show clear photos of African American children who share seven family holiday activities. The pages are sturdy but the padded cover and end paper use might make it less desirable for library circulation than individual gift giving. 
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan
 
Poydar, Nancy.  RHYME TIME VALENTINE.  Illus by author.  New York: Holiday,
    2002.   30p.  0-8234-1684-4; hb., 16.95    2001-024113    PreS-Gr. 3    E

    Ruby loves everything about Valentine’s Day and her favorite color is red.  By the time Room Nine gets ready for the holiday, Ruby has already written her rhyming cards.  On Valentine’s Day, Ruby wears red, gives her parents their valentines, and puts her homemade valentines in a bag and sets out for school.  Disaster strikes when the wind takes her valentines.  Ruby tries to make new ones out of orange, green, and purple paper because the red color is gone but they don’t seem right..  There are two solutions to Ruby’s dilemma, one is her parent’s valentine gift to her, and the other is provided by the elements.  The cartoon-like illustrations are lively and show a multicultural classroom.  The last page shows how to make a heart using colored paper, pencil, and scissors. This is a good holiday book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Prelutsky, Jack.  HALLOWEEN COUNTDOWN.  Illus by Dan Yaccarino.
    New York:  HarperFestival, 2002.  18p.  0-06-000512-2; bd.bk., $6.99     PreS-K      BB

    This Halloween board book is not too scary until the end when the ghost on the double-page spread says “Boo!”  The text, originally published as a poem called “Countdown,” was published in a book by Prelutsky called IT’S HALLOWEEN (Greenwillow, 1997).  This counting poem makes an age appropriate board book to help preschoolers count down from ten ghosts who reside in a variety of places like the attic or kitchen to only one ghost.  Although this is a Halloween poem, it could be placed with board books because ghosts are popular all year long.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Roberts, Bethany.  THANKSGIVING MICE!  Illus by Doug Cushman.  New York:
    Clarion, 2001.  32p.  0-618-12040-8; hb., $13.00   00-047456   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    The watercolor illustrations are framed on each page and the text on the double pages forms a couplet.  The rhymes help beginning readers in their independent reading.  The mice are preparing for a Thanksgiving play.  Costumes, sets, lines, curtains, and props are shown in the illustrations.  Other animals come to the play.  Act 1 begins with "Pilgrim mice sailed on a ship."  The charming mice land on Plymouth Rock, friendly folk give them some seeds, the harvest is bountiful so they invite their friends to share in a feast.  The animal audience applauds the play and so will young readers.  The essence of sharing, the keystone of Thanksgiving Day, is shown in a charming age appropriate manner.  This story can also inspire and provide practical ideas to youngsters who want to perform their own Thanksgiving play.  Read this aloud at preschools, public library story hours, and early primary students in schools.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Roosa,  Karen.  BEACH DAY.  Illus by Maggie Smith.  New York: Clarion, 2001.
    32p.    0-618-02923-0; hb., $15.00  00-043010   PreS-Gr. 2     E

    It is not easy to sustain stanzas where the first, second, and fourth lines rhyme and have it contribute to a theme for an entire picture book.  Roosa has done an admirable job and Smith’s watercolors contribute to the overall effect.  Watercolors are a perfect medium for illustrations in a beach book.  One example is a doublepage spread of a water skier and the spray from her skis to provide rainbow colored water with the text curved on it:  “Sparkling spray,/Jeweled array,/Water-skiers/On their way.”   Many of the pages are double page spreads with no loss of pictures in the gutters.  The family (four children, parents, grandmother and their dog) spend a day at the beach and the readers enjoy the experience as much as they do in this satisfying picture book.  This title is essential wherever there are beaches and is an important purchase elsewhere because it works well with individuals as well as for reading aloud.  The colorful objects on the end papers can be used with individual preschoolers for identifying umbrellas, hats, books, bathing suits, real and toy birds and other items taken to the beach.  Primary teachers can use this book as a pattern for poetry writing about other experiences.  Third and fourth grade teachers can use the book for choral reading.  Three different children can read the first three lines and the fourth line can be read in unison.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Ryder, Joanne.  A FAWN IN THE GRASS.  Illus by Keiko Narahashi.  New York:
    Holt, 2001.  32p.    0-8050-6236-X; hb., $16.95   00-24284   PreS-Gr. 3   E

    Narahashi uses gouache and watercolors to show a unisex child discovering nature in this first person rhyme.  The illustrations are large enough for children to see during story time, but contain enough details for children to discover later on his/her own.  The brief rhyming text is suitable for the age group being reached.  Ryder’s inspiration came from a real fawn that lived in the Ryder/Yep yard for several weeks.  Kids will have the fun of trying to find the fawn in the photo that accompanies the Author’s Note.   Teachers can also use this book to introduce the concept of camouflage.  This book is an excellent purchase for any library but is a priority purchase for Upper Peninsula school and public libraries, no matter how small.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Schanzer, Rosalyn.  THE OLD CHISHOLM TRAIL: A COWBOY SONG.
    Washington, DC:  National Geographic, 2001.  32p.  0-7922-7559-4; hb.,
    $16.95     00-012382    Gr. K-3     E

    This song of the wild west tells about how cattle drives went up the Chisholm Trail from Texas to the railroads in Abilene, Kansas.  According to the introduction, the song originally had a thousand verses to describe the trip.  Numerous verses are included and the familiar refrain “Come a ki yi yippy yippy yay, yippy yay! Come a ki yi yippy yippy yay!   Lyrics for two verses with music appear at the end of the book.  The illustrations are a combination of cartoon and folk art.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Singer, Marilyn.  QUIET NIGIHT.  Illus by John Manders.   New York: Clarion,
    2002.   32p.  0--618-12044-hb., $15.00   2001-023098   PreS-Gr. 3   E

    This cumulative story in rhyme shares noises of ten creatures beginning with one frog and ending with ten campers.  Other creatures are crickets, mosquitoes, mice, raccoons, coyotes, fish, geese, and owls.  This audience participation story also functions as a counting book.  The gouache and color pencil illustrations show the woodland creatures in a humorous manner, illuminated by a full moon.  The last sentence is “What a NOISY night!”  Sharing this book in libraries and homes will also be a noisy activity.  Teacher will use the book to introduce woodland animals.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Spalding, Andrea. IT'S RAINING, IT'S POURING.  Illus. by Leslie Elizabeth Watts.
    Custer, WA; Orca, 2001. unp.  1-55143-186-6; hb. $15.95      PreS-Gr. 2      E

    This is one of the nursery-rhyme songs that once you start singing it, it just won't stop circling through your head.   At least not until you go to bed like the Old Man and snore up a storm.  Spalding has put a twist on this tale, however.  Little Girl, who incidentally hates thunder and wants to play,  is not satisfied with the answer her mom gave her as to why the Old Man is stuck in bed, so she sets out on an imaginative journey to find the answer.  Grabbing a "laddery" ladder, Little Girl climbs through the clouds and finds a giant in bed because he is feeling poorly.  She makes a return journey home to retrieve some honey and lemon, some gingerbread cookies, some scarves, and a hot water bottle.  Her generous spirit is rewarded when the Old Man turns off the storm and like all happy-ever-after books, Little Girl can go out to play.  Watts' illustrations aptly shuttle the reader between reality and fantasy in this work of art that is sure to be a real tonic on a rainy-in-the-house day.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Walton, Rick.  BUNNY DAY:  TELLING TIME FROM BREAKFAST TO
    BEDTIME.  Illus by Paige Miglio.  New York:  Harper, 2002.   32p.  0-06-029183-4;
    hb., $15.95    0-06-029184-2; lib.bdg., $15.89   00-054061   PreS-Gr. 2    E

    This title is a companion book to Walton's SO MANY BUNNIES: A BEDTIME ABC AND COUNTING BOOK (Harper, 2000) and ONE MORE BUNNY (Harper, 1998).   The illustrations cover all double page spreads except for a small box containing the four rhyming lines made up of two couplets.  Readers learn what the bunnies will be doing each hour from eight in the morning to eight at night.  This is a delightful way to help youngsters learn to tell time although there is no numerical representation; just the word representing the numeral.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Weare, Tim.  I’M A LITTLE GIRAFFE.  Illus by author. Finger Puppet Pal series. 
    New York: Scholastic Cartwheel, 2002.  12p.  0-439-40641-2; bd.bk., $6.95   PreS  BB

    A latex puppet attached to the last page shows through to the cover via a die cut circle.  The baby giraffe, who meets four other animals and finally his parents, appears on each page.  Told in rhyme in the first person, the giraffe introduces his friends: hippo, tortoise, cheetah, and crocodile.   After describing each friend, the little giraffe says “He (She)’s not like me.  This board book allows readers to interact with the story.  There is one problem with this book.  The little giraffe is only shown from half of his neck up while his friends are shown in their entirety and the giraffe puppet is out of proportion.  When readers meet his parents, they are shown only from half of their necks up so that their size is also not in relation to the friends.  If this book is purchased by libraries, a large notice about the latex content of the puppet needs to be prominently featured on the cover so those allergic to latex can beware.    
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Weare, Tim.  I’M A LITTLE PUPPY.   Illus by author. Finger Puppet Pal series. 
    New York: Scholastic Cartwheel, 2002.  12p.  0-439-40642-0; bd.bk., $6.95   PreS  BB

    A latex puppet attached to the last page shows through to the cover via a die cut circle.  The puppy plays with four friends and on the last page they say good night to him. This rhyme is told in the first person by the puppy.  This board book allows readers to interact with the story.  There are several problems with this book.  The size of the puppy is not in scale with the ducks, pigs, cows, and hens.  If this book is purchased by libraries, a large notice about the latex content of the puppet needs to be prominently featured on the cover so those allergic to latex can beware.    
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Wick, Walter.  CAN YOU SEE WHAT I SEE: PICTURE PUZLES TO
    SEARCH AND SOLVE.  New York:  Scholastic Cartwheel, 2002.  36p.    K-Gr. 4     E

    This is the tenth anniversary of the first I SPY book (Scholastic, 1992) by Marzolo and Wick.  Now Wick, the photographer, branches out on his own.  A long slim poem appears beside each photo that covers three quarters of each double page spread.  The poems provide items that viewers need to find in the photos.  Sometimes it is not easy, as in the poem and photos called “In Bins,” pages 12-13.  As usual, the bright primary colors that accompany the dozen rhymes are clear and detailed.  This is a picture book to look at again and again.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Willard, Nancy.  THE TALE I TOLD SASHA.  Illus. by David Christiana.  Boston:
    Little, 1999.  32p.    0-316-94115-8; hb., $15.95    97-18201     K-Gr. 3     E

    Fantasy and nonsense are the mixture found in this poetic story of a yellow ball that is lost and found in the realm of an imaginary world that belongs to Sasha.  "Believe, Believe!" is what the sailor calls as he invites readers to follow the yellow ball as it rolls and bounces across the pages of this book that is filled with color and could tell the story without the text.  As could the poem be read without the illustrations.  But put the two together and what have you got?  A story that starts with a die-cut circle which shows Sasha peering through on one side and ends with golden endpapers that match the color of the yellow ball, on the other.
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Yolen, Jane.  OFF WE GO!  Illus by Laurel Molk.  Boston:  Little, 2000.  16p.
    0-316-0-072; b. bk., $5.95    98-68895   PreS-K    BB

    Each double-page spread introduces animals (mice, frogs, moles, snakes, ducks, and spiders) that are off to Grandma’s house.  This picture book translates well into board book format.  The alliteration and rhyme make it fun to read aloud to preschoolers.  For daycare centers, public library board book collections, and personal giving.  Grandmothers might want to keep this one at their house for little visitors.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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