Dewey Guide: 000s

Subjects Listed in This Directory

000 GENERAL

O'Meara, Stephen James.  ARE YOUR AFRAID YET? :THE SCIENCE BEHIND SCARY STUFF.  
     
Illus. by Jeremy Kaposy.  Tonawanda,NY: Kids Can Press, 2009. 79p.
      ISBN: 978-1-55453-294-0 hb. $17.95.  Gr. 3-6   j001.944

      Boys (and girls) who can never get enough grisly, gruesome facts will not be disappointed with this collection of fascinating, bloody tidbits. For instance, did you know a decapitated chicken, named Miracle Mike, actually lived for 2 years by being fed with an eye-dropper through his esophagus? The author covers werewolves, the guillotine, ghosts, all these popular topics and includes possible scientific explanations for things that frighten us. Lots of black and white drawings add to the appeal. Put this on your scary books list. It will be a sure hit.
      Mary Olmsted, Librarian, Tahquamenon Area School Public Library, Newberry, MI

Morrison, Taylor.  CIVIL WAR ARTIST.  Illus. by the author.  New York: Walter Lorraine/
     Houghton Mifflin, 1999.  32p.  0-395-91426-4, hb. $16.00.  97-52738  Gr. 4-6+    070.4

     Mathew Brady is a well-known Civil War photographer, but most people do not know that contemporary technology couldn't convert the photos for use  in the newspapers.  Instead, William Forbes provided sketches of battles for Burton's Illustrated News in New York City.  Illustrations and text tell how the sketches were turned into wood engravings.  Readers learn how 35 blocks of Turkish boxwood were worked on by many artists, inked, waxed, and put through the press to prepare an engraving which would appear in the newspaper four weeks after a battle. A glossary explains printing and historical terms. This picture book can be used in a variety of situations and at many levels from intermediate grades through college by art teachers who want to explain how engravings were made and history teachers who want materials to expand  the Civil War.  Public librarians will want to direct adult patrons interested in art to this book.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
     32 years experience as a school library/media specialist

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 000 DICTIONARIES

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004 COMPUTERS

Cook, Peter and Scott Manning.  WHY DOESN’T MY FLOPPY DISK FLOP?
               Illus. by Ed Morrow.  New York:  John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1999.  90p.
               ISBN 0-471-18429-2 pb. $12.95   Gr. 3-6   j004

                The book begins with a brief history of computers and is then divided into five sections:  
hardware, software, the Internet, good computer habits, and the computer future.  Each section is 
based on a question and answer format which is familiar to the authors who answered such questions 
as CompuDudes for 12 years on an NPR radio show.  The answers are clear and informative.  The 
entertaining illustrations are done as black and white cartoons.  There is a glossary of technical terms.  
All in all, the book presents a lot of practical information in a concise and interesting manner.  It is the 
sort of book that a child, who is intimidated by the idea of reading a whole book, will enjoy and will 
probably end up reading anyway.  Adults will find this book enjoyable and informative too!
            Kay T. Elzinga, Member, Superiorland Board of Directors
Sherman,  Josepha.  BILL GATES: COMPUTER KING.  Illus with photos. Gateway Biographies series.  
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2000.  84p.  0-7613-1771-6 lib.bdg. $22.90.   Gr. 2-5     004 or 921

    The flowing text, large type, and photos make this an interesting biography.  Sherman shares information about Bill’s school years, first computer program written at age 13, first computer company, career and rivalry with Apple Computers.  This book is more than a biography; it is also provides information about computer software and Microsoft Corporation.  Shannon ends with the ongoing investigation of Microsoft by the Dept. of Justice.  There is a chronology, index, and list of further reading, including three web sites.  The best part of the book is that Sherman weaves computer definitions seamlessly into the text.   A drawback is that there are no chapter notes or bibliography.   However, this is a good biography for this age group.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist
 

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011 BIBLIOGRAPHY

Adamson, Lynda G. AMERICAN HISTORICAL FICTION:  AN ANNOTATED
    GUIDE TO NOVELS FOR ADULTS AND YOUNG ADULTS.  Phoenix: Oryx,
    1999. 405p.  1-57356-067-7  hb. $49.95  98-38044  Adult.   016.813

    This title contains sentence annotations of 3,387 books arranged chronologically from North America before 1600 to after 1975.  The titles are for adults, but those suitable for young adults have a diamond in front of them.  A separate list of these Young Adult  titles is included in one appendix while another includes book awards.  Indexes are:  author; title; genre; geographic; and subject.  A book number is given in the appendixes and indexes to find the book faster in the chronological list.  High school media specialists who need lists of historical fiction (adult books suitable for young adults) to select books  to integrate reading with American and world history programs will appreciate this title, as well public librarians working with youth.  Highly recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Adamson, Lynda G.  LITERATURE CONNECTIONS TO AMERICAN HISTORY:
    K-6: RESOURCES TO ENHANCE AND ENTICE.  Englewood CO:  Libraries
    Unlimited, 1998. 542p.  1-56308-504-6; lib.bdg. $30.00     Adult    016.973

     This title should be in every elementary collection or at least one copy should be owned by every school district. Especially valuable are three annotated bibliographies of 2,511 books, 19 CD-ROMs, and 205 videotapes.  The first part of the book includes 13 chronological periods in North America "Before 1600" to "Since 1975" then by grades (K-2, 3, 4, 5, and 6) and then arranged by historical fiction, biography, history, multimedia, and video.  Titles can appear on as many as three lists.  Teachers will like the list by grade levels, but media specialists consider a wide range of reading levels when developing collections on a subject and would probably prefer that the alphabetical list of titles with annotations be listed in chronological order even though they can take advantage of the book numbers in the title index to locate the annotations.   This is an important purchase.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Adamson, Lynda G.  LITERATURE CONNECTIONS TO AMERICAN HISTORY 7-12:
    RESOURCES TO ENHANCE AND ENTICE.  Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited,
    1998.  511p.  1-56308-503-8; lib.bdg., $34.50    97-19560    Adult.   016.973

    Adamson's 7-12 book contains 2,486 books, 43 CD-ROMs, and 460 videos.  The arrangement of this title is similar to Adamson's LITERATURE CONNECTIONS TO AMERICAN HISTORY, K-6.  This reference title should be purchased for middle and high school collections as well as university collections in  education and library schools.  Librarians need this book for collection development; teachers will use it for curriculum enrichment.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Adamson, Lynda G..   LITERATURE CONNECTIONS TO WORLD HISTORY 7-12:
    RESOURCES TO ENHANCE AND ENTICE.  Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited,
    1998.  511p.   1-56308-505-4; lib.bdg. $32.50   97-35953   Adult   016.809

    This title is organized by geography from prehistory to the 20th century, then by five grade level categories from 7 through 11/12.  Annotations are provided for 2,136 books, 46 CD-ROMs, and 523 videos. This title is similar in organization to the companion titles which include American historical fiction but are even more valuable because lists of world historical fiction are not as plentiful.   This title should be purchased for middle and high school collections as well as university collections with education and library schools.  Elementary teachers and librarians will be interested in the companion book, LITERATURE CONNECTIONS TO WORLD HISTORY K-3: RESOURCES TO ENHANCE AND ENTICE.  
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Adamson, Lynda G.   WORLD HISTORICAL FICTION: AN ANNOTATED GUIDE
    TO NOVELS FOR ADULTS AND YOUNG ADULTS. Oryx, 1999.  719p.
    1-57356-067-7; hb.,  $49.95.   98-39981    Adult     016.808

    Librarians who want adult fiction titles suitable for use with world history programs in high schools need to purchase this book.  Adamson includes 32 genres and 6,116 titles from prehistory to the 20th century arranged by geography then chronology.  The book is similar in format to Adamson's AMERICAN HISTORICAL FICTION: AN ANNOTATED GUIDE TO NOVELS FOR ADULTS AND YOUNG ADULTS.  (Orxy, 1998)  Recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Ammon, Bette D. And Gale W. Sherman.  MORE RIP-ROARING READS FOR
    RELUCTANT TEEN READERS.   Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, 1999.
    161p. 1-56308-571-2; pb.,  $26.50  Adults.  016.8108   or   028.5

    The books shared are divided into two groups, 21 books for middle schoolers and 20 for high schoolers.  The following information is given for each of the 40 books:  complete bibliographic information; genres; themes; reading level; interest level; review bibliographies; author information; plot summary; introductory information; booktalk ideas; author's words for introducing the book; literature extensions/alternative book report activities; and three bookmarks each with ten or more related titles.  All of the information is valuable to teachers and school library/media specialists but the 120 bookmarks, which list 1,500 titles, are especially useful for readers' advisory and can be placed in the focus book, as part of a book display, or given out as bookmarks.   There is an author/title index and another for genres/themes/activities.   Educators may wish to visit or revisit  RIP-ROARING READS FOR RELUCTANT TEEN READERS. (LU, 93).  This book is an essential purchase for middle and high school media specialists and youth librarians in public libraries who do not have time to keep up with reading as well as those who read voraciously.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Lewis, Marjorie, ed.   OUTSTANDING BOOKS FOR THE COLLEGE BOUND: CHOICES
    FOR A GENERATION.  Chicago: ALA, 1996.  217p.  0-8389-3456-0; pb. $22.00.    011.625

    High school media specialists who want an updated list of all the titles that appeared in the pamphlets prepared by committees of YASD and YALSA over the years, will want to purchase this book.  Although it is not mentioned in Lewis's book, the first book which listed these titles was by Mary Ann Paulin and Susan Berlin (ALA, 1982) and was called OUTSTANDING BOOKS FOR THE COLLEGE BOUND.  In this new book, the Young Adult Services Division's choices from 1959-1996 are arranged by subject with author, title and year indexes and a chart of books which have appeared more than six times. Sentence annotations accompany the thousand titles.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Lewis, Valerie & Walter M. Maynes.  VALERIE AND WALTER'S BEST BOOKS FOR CHILDREN: 
A LIVELY OPINIONATED GUIDE. 
New York: Avon, 1998.  08p.  0-380-79438-1 pb. $15.00    011.62

    Over 2,000 books from birth to age 14 are arranged by four age categories (babies to teens) and listening level of the reader, beginning with books for listeners of all ages.  Annotations are personal and the authors often share how they used the book with students.  One appendix is an alphabetical list of themes. There is a combined A/T index.  School library media specialists and public children's librarians as well as teachers of children's literature will enjoy this lively book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Matthew, Kathryn I. and Joy L. Lowe.  GUIDE TO RECOMMENDED CHILDREN’S
    BOOKS AND MEDIA FOR USE WITH EVERY ELEMENTARY SUBJECT
.
    New York: Neal-Schuman, 2002.  407p.  1-5570-431-X; pb., $55.00  011.62
 
    Chapters are arranged by subjects:  math, science, English language arts, social studies, health, sports, recreation, dance, art, and music.  Each subject is divided into numerous sections.  The math chapter includes types like subtraction and division; the health chapter includes nutrition, feelings, self-esteem, manners, aging and death; and the social studies is organized from the new world in 1530-1760 to world power from 1945-2001.  The bulk of the book is devoted to annotated bibliographies of books with copyrights which are in the mid and late 1990s.  Some are as new as 2001.  The Explorations section provides broad suggestions for using the books.  There is a set of professional references at the end of each chapter.   Before the bibliography, the introduction provides background for the topic.  For instance the music chapter includes nine standards from The National Standards for Arts Education (ArtsEdge, 1992).  Besides books, there are CD-ROMs and videos in the bibliographies.  There are subject and author/title indexes.  The appendix includes addresses for journals, professional organizations, Internet sites, videotapes, audio books, and software companies.  Teachers and librarians who saw this book asked to borrow it.  Purchase for library schools and schools of education and elementary building collections.   
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Rand, Donna, et al.  BLACK BOOKS GALORE!  GUIDE TO GREAT AFRICAN AMERICAN 
    CHILDREN'S BOOKS. 
New York: Wiley, 1998.  243p. 0-471-19353-4; pb.,  $15.95    016.973.

    Annotations of 500 books, featuring African American or African themes, are arranged in four sections from preschool to young adults.  A preface to each of these sections explains the characteristics of books suitable  for each age group.  Special features, books for parents and families, awards (Coretta Scott King, Newbery, Caldecott, and Reading Rainbow), information about African American children's publishing and four indexes (author, title, illustrator, and topic) add to the value of the book.  Purchase this book to help with collection development even in school and public libraries that do not have African American populations.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Stephens, Claire et. al.   CORETTA SCOTT KING AWARD BOOKS:  USING GREAT
    LITERATURE WITH CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS
.  Englewood, CO:
    Libraries Unlimited, 2000.  238p. 1-56308-685-9 pb. $26.00     016.8

    Winner lists are organized by chronology, genre, and alphabet; some of them annotated.  Biographies, integrated curriculum ideas, activities, and web sites make this an important purchase for media centers serving students K-12, public libraries, and libraries in library schools or colleges of education.  Some projects include vocabulary lists, crossword puzzles, radio plays, word searches, and study questions.  Projects include literary elements such as characterizations, symbolism, and irony.  A dozen full-page biographies with photos are included; however, they are the most famous of the authors; i.e., the McKissick’s, Walter Den Myers, and Virginia Hamilton instead of those that are more difficult to find.  A shorter biography for each person would have better served readers.  Librarians in many types of libraries will use this book for identifying and using books by African Americans.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Toussaint, Pamela.  GREAT BOOKS FOR AFRICAN-AMERICAN CHILDREN.  New York:  
    Penguin/Plume, 1999.  278p.  0-452-28044-3 pb. $12.95    016.973   or    028.162

    The introduction provides a history of the black experience in children's literature.  A brief chapter lists 25 things adults can do at home to help children enjoy reading.  The book is organized into four age groups from young children to young adults and each section is prefaced with brief information about characteristics of books and what readers in this age group like about them.   Annotations include notations for Newbery, Caldecott, King, ALA Notables, Boston Globe/Horn Book, and Reading Rainbow citations as well as indicate which books are suitable for reading aloud.  After each of  the 250 annotations, there is a section called  "Explore these"  which includes questions about the book to explore with children.  Valuable features include an "Ooops List" of out of print titles,  books for adults, children's magazines, TV shows, videos, web sites, and Coretta Scott King award winners along with e-mail and street addresses.  A special feature is a list of web sites of bookstores that are members of the American Booksellers Association which carry African American books.  The two indexes include author/title and theme/main value points.  This title is recommended for elementary media centers and public libraries for collection development even those who do not serve an African-American population. University collections serving education and library schools will also find this title valuable.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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025 LIBRARY SCIENCE

Appelt, Kathi and Jeanne Cannella Schmitzer.  DOWN CUT SHIN CREEK:  THE  PACK
    HORSE LIBRARIANS OF KENTUCKY.
  New York:  HarperCollins, 2001. 58p. 
    0-06-029135-4 hb. $16.95   0-06-029244-X lib.bdg. $16.89.    Gr. 3-7+     027.076

    This book begins with a picture of Grace Caudill Lucas who was a former pack horse librarian.  During the Great Depression, Kentucky was hit hard because it was one of the poorest states in the U.S., especially in the mountainous eastern half.  One of FDR’s Works Projects Administration programs was the Kentucky Pack Horse Library Project.   The WPA paid for librarians to maintain the headquarters library and to pay women to carry the books into the hollows on horseback and dispense them to individuals and one-room schoolhouses.  The chapter called “Inside the Saddlebags” provides a glimpse of what people were reading in the 1930s.  The recipes for Ash Cake and Rice Pudding that are included in the book are samples of recipes given to the book women and reflect the unwillingness of the mountain women to take “something for nothing.”   The black and white photos reflect the times and put the text in perspective.  This program, which lasted between 1943 and 1957, was a success.  One legacy was that Perkins, a congressman from Kentucky, sponsored the Library Services Act.  Perkins had been a teacher in a rural county serviced by the Kentucky book women.  The book concludes with an index and a bibliography of interviews, books, articles, pamphlets, theses, and websites.  This would be a good addition for middle and high school collections where the Great Depression is studied.  Public libraries and university library school collections should also purchase this title.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Champelli, Lisa.  THE YOUTH CYBRARIAN’S GUIDE TO DEVELOPING INSTRUCTIONAL,  
    CURRICULUM-RELATED SUMMER READING, AND RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS.
  
    New York: Neal-Schuman, 2002. 187p.  1-55570-427-1; pb. $49.95     004.678071  

    The instructional programs come from school library media centers and public libraries and are geared to readers in middle school and above and for parents of elementary school children.  Programs include library source, overview, program title and web address, target audience, equipment, program description, goals, insights and improvements, and contact person.   Samples are:  homework help links, Internet safety tutorials, college planning web sites, a WebQuest on evaluating Web Sites, book review forms, and web design workshops. 
    A section called “The Youth Cybrarian’s Source Box” includes an annotated list of search tools for kids, web portals, free clip art or web page hosting sites, page editors, graphic design tools, educational portal web sites, filters, and professional association sites.  A glossary also includes sources of online glossaries.  The chapter notes and references are valuable.  The graphics are often home pages.  This book would be valuable for developing good school/public library relationships as well as reading programs.   
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Flanagan, Alicie K.  LIBRARIANS.  Community Workers series.  Minneapolis:  Compass
    Point, 2001.   32p.  0-7565-0063-X; lib.bdg., $19.93   Gr. K-3   020.92

    In simple sentences, Flanagan tells what librarians do, the places they work, training, tools, and skills they need, and problems they face.  There are two full-page photos with labeled tools and identified work settings.  Numerous photos appear throughout the book.  The page outlining the librarian’s day is interesting, but misleading.  Elsewhere in the book, there is a sentence that makes it clear that most libraries do not have more than one professional librarian.  However, in a list of duties given to a librarian, some are jobs often done by clerks, pages, or student volunteers (checking out books and returning them to the shelves) rather than the professional librarian.  Even turning on the computers is probably not the job of the professional unless it is a one-person school or public library.  The book leaves readers with the impression that anyone who works in a library is a librarian.  At least the message is clear that librarians read newspapers and reviews on their own time instead of sitting around reading all day.  A glossary defines a library catalog, but photos within the book show three card catalogs and only one identified computer catalog, devoting too many photos to a dying piece of equipment.  Judith King, at the American Library Association and a former president of the American Association of School Librarians, was content adviser to this book.   One wonders why she did not point out the predominance of card catalogs or mention that the school librarian is often called a media specialist.  Perhaps only the text was reviewed.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Harvey, Miles.  THE ISLAND OF LOST MAPS:  A TRUE STORY OF CARTOGRAPHIC CRIME.  
New York: Random House, 2000.  405p.  0-375-50151-7; hb., $24.95   00-025604    Adult   025.8

    After the Hungarian Revolution, educated immigrants from Central Europe enrolled in American colleges.  Numerous Latvians entered the Library School at Western Michigan University.  One attorney became a law librarian.  Another, probably with a PhD. in history or geography whom we knew as Dr. H---, became a map librarian.  How many media specialists know a map librarian personally? 
    After reading this book, librarians of all types will meet map librarians and identify with those whose collections were defaced.  The book is a combination mystery, thriller, crime stopper, history/geography lesson, psychological drama, and journalists' quest.  Gilbert Bland, under many aliases, was a real thief who razored maps from rare books in research libraries in the U.S. and Canada and was apprehended in 1995.  The reactions of the librarians and their administrators, attorneys, the F.B.I., and the criminal justice system are fascinating but disturbing.  The author is a journalist who wrote a magazine article about Bland and decided to study him in depth.  Harvey shares the world of cartographers, collectors, dealers, auctioneers, and their subculture and juxtapositions them against the history of maps before and during the exploration of the new world and the westward movement within the U.S.  Readers will be astounded by inside information about Marco Polo, Columbus, Magellan, Drake, Sir Walter Raleigh, Benedict Arnold, and John Fremont.  The old black and white maps are a bonus.  Also, read the children’s book about Eratosthenes, head of the legendary library at Alexandria—Kathryn Lasky’s THE LIBRARIAN WHO MEASURED THE EARTH (Little, 1994). 
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Hunter, Gregory S.  PRESERVING DIGITAL INFORMATION.  How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians 
series.  New York:  Neal-Schuman, 2000.  168p.  1-55570-353-E pb. $59.00    Adult    025.8

    "Preserving digital information always is a moving target" according to Hunter who helps practitioners make decisions about reformatting, copying, converting, or migrating information.  Hunter helps readers understand the nature of the preservation, controlling the storage problem, research in electronic records and digital preservation how digital images are created and, and the challenges to each type of media.
    The best part of this book is the storage, handling, and preservation “best practices.”   The thirty-page bibliography is noteworthy.  Librarians at all levels need to know about this topic and this title does it admirably.  Purchase for professional collections at the district and regional levels, Information Studies programs at universities, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Junion-Metz, Gail and Derrek L. Metz. INSTANT WEB FORMS AND SURVEYS FOR
    CHILDREN’S AND YA SERVICES AND SCHOOL LIBRARIES
.  New York: 
    Neal-Schuman, 2001.  261p.  1-55570-413-1; pb., $75.00   Book with CD  027.7  

    The CD and the manual each contain twenty-four forms and surveys; the one on the CD is in HTML format and both are in Perl scripts.  This provides a vehicle for school and public librarians to ask questions of patrons online or on paper.  Some of the forms and surveys are: asking a reference question, ways for teachers and home schooling parents to let libraries know about upcoming homework assignments, citing a source, getting help with homework, suggesting a new web link, reporting a broken link, signing the guest book, evaluating a web site, recommending an item, applying for a library card, locating a missing item that isn’t checked out, or surveying student program interests.  Purchase for district collections in school and public libraries, REMCS and universities training teachers and librarians.  
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Keeling, Joyce.  LESSON PLANS FOR THE BUSY LIBRARIAN:  A STANDARDS-
    BASED APPROACH FOR THE ELEMENTARY LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER

    Westport, CT:  Libraries Unlimited, 2002.  264p.  1-56308-869-X pb. $30.00   027.62

    The book begins with nine AASL/AECT Information Literacy Standards.  Each of the 105 lesson plans includes:  standards, learning objectives, teaching direction, reproducible worksheets and graphics, learning styles, teaching team, and related resources.  Lessons include standards from Kendall and Marzano’s Content Knowledge: A Compendium of Standards and Benchmarks for K-12 Education, 3rd ed. (Aurora, CO, 2000) as well as various multiple intelligences.  The lessons are divided by age levels from kindergarten through fifth grade.  Some lesson topics include holidays, nursery rhymes, folk tales, and literary genres.  Numerous types of resources include dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases and The Reader’s Guide.  Some science topics are butterflies, spiders, bats, snakes, and wolves.  Except for the bibliography in the encyclopedia units that include CD-ROMs and web addresses, the resources are for print materials only.  The lesson about key words is geared to encyclopedias.  The card catalog unit is traditional and does not mention or address online catalogs, making it valuable for the few elementary libraries that still have traditional card catalogs.
   Although there are no technology lessons, these are excellent print lessons.   Pick and choose from lessons in this book and work them in with your own technology lessons at the elementary building level
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Mass, Wendy, ed. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE.  San Diego, CA: Greenhaven,
    2001.  208p.   0-7377-0568-X; hb. $22.45     College +   

    This book is a collection of essays about the history of children's literature, themes emerging throughout the history of children's literature, and controversial issues in books for children.  The essays range in date from an excerpt of an article by C.S. Lewis to a recent article about Harry Potter by Alan Jacobs.  The emphasis of the text is to provide a historical context and background from which to consider books of the past and books of the present written for children.  Scholars, educators, and writers would find this book to be a good overview of the field, but a practitioner looking for information about sharing books with children will find limited help in this text.
    Sandra Imdieke, Professor of Children's Literature, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI 

Snyder, Timothy.  GETTING LEAD-BOTTOMED ADMINISTRATORS EXCITED
    ABOUT SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA CENTERS
.  Englewood, CO: Libraries
    Unlimited, 2000.  184p.  1-56308-794-4; pb.,  $27.00    027.8

    After presenting types of personal characteristics like right-brained, Type A, and explorer, Snyder invites readers to decide which characteristics they share and relates this to learning and leadership styles.  Characteristics of administrators are also included.   Various roles of librarians such as keepers of knowledge and change agents are explored and case studies of five media specialists are shared.   Some topics include planning for success as well as implementing and evaluating the plan.  There is also a section on gaining credibility.  The best features are the checklists and figures.  Some figures include:  components of successful planning; objective examples; a plan outline; builders of relationships; and the informal customer satisfaction survey.  checklists include:  intelligence gathering; library media center resources; and evaluation.   Although the title lists administrators as the target; students, teachers, parents, and the community are part of building better relationships.   This introspective look at media specialists is worth reading by media specialists at all levels, school library supervisors, and schools of education or library science.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Stein, Barbara and Riusa W. Brown.  RUNNING A SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA
    CENTER,
2nd ed.  179p.  (How-to-do-it Manuals for Librarian, # 121).  New York:
    Neal-Schuman, 2002.  1-55570-439-5; pb., $49.95.

    Major inclusions are goal setting, stress management, professional organizations, ordering and processing materials, arranging books and multimedia on shelves, circulation, maintaining collection, mending, inventory, weeding, challenged materials, hiring and working with staff, support staff and student job descriptions, designing and using facilities, and information literacy.  The information is basic but instructive and would be good for beginning media specialists or for training media aides about the functions of libraries.  The book also provides basic background for anyone wishing to know how to accomplish specific tasks and the appendixes and templates are useful to experienced media specialists.
    The valuable templates include:  equipment control chart, Internet permission form, sample line-item budget, annual library media center report, annual circulation report, cataloging additions and deletions, sample EBSCO renewal list, B & T online order, requisition form, with “do not exceed” instructions, cataloging specifications, periodical check-in form on a spreadsheet, non-print evaluation form, inventory maintenance card and checklist, cataloging, steps in processing materials, sample cataloging, searches in an online catalog on a WebPAC, form letter for free materials, overdue notices, repair checklist, request for reconsideration of materials form, and a volunteer application.   Seasoned media specialists will appreciate the online and snail mail addresses of vendors for books, periodical, AV producers and distributors, equipment, furnishings, supplies and sources for reviews of non-print items, free and inexpensive materials, instructional aids, filtering software packages, and addresses for listservs, discussion lists, and newsgroups.   There is an Acceptable Use plan for Electronic Communication and Data Management, learning style type indicator, The Library Bill of Rights, and professional association addresses.  This book is for experienced people and “newbies” alike.  Purchase for REMCs, district collections, and universities with school library media programs. 
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center , Marquette, MI

Wright, Kieth and Judith Davie.  FORCASTING THE FUTURE:  SCHOOL LIBRARY
    MEDIA PROGRAMS IN AN AGE OF CHANGE
.  School Librarianship series. 
    Lanham, MD:  Scarecrow Press, 1999.  263p.  0-8108-3697-1  pb. $35.00     027.8

    Although this series is directed toward library school professors, students, and district supervisors, it is an important book for building level media specialists. The authors provide information that can be used to make arguments for media services when writing grants, convincing administrators, and upgrading the thinking of media specialists.  If you don’t have time to read the entire book, you can read the chapter introductions and summaries and the bold headings to keep up to date on issues in education and how they impact our field.   The authors tell how emerging technologies change the roles of media specialists: changing patterns in education (vouchers, charter schools, home schooling, learning styles, multiple intelligences); lifelong learning; educational change models; overcoming obstacles to media program development; suggestions for collaboration; scheduling; collection development; planning and evaluation; as well as facilities and technology principles.  An example of the practicality of this book is the diagram showing screen, chair, and table heights with body positions for effective and safe computer use.  The list of national educational organizations engaged in school reform is especially helpful.   Recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

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028 READING

Ammon, Bette D. And Gale W. Sherman.  MORE RIP-ROARING READS FOR
    RELUCTANT TEEN READERS.   Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, 1999.
    161p. 1-56308-571-2; pb.,  $26.50  Adults   016.8108  or  028.5

    The books shared are divided into two groups, 21 books for middle schoolers and 20 for high schoolers.  The following information is given for each of the 40 books:  complete bibliographic information; genres; themes; reading level; interest level; review bibliographies; author information; plot summary; introductory information; booktalk ideas; author's words for introducing the book; literature extensions/alternative book report activities; and three bookmarks each with ten or more related titles.  All of the information is valuable to teachers and school library/media specialists but the 120 bookmarks, which list 1,500 titles, are especially useful for readers' advisory and can be placed in the focus book, as part of a book display, or given out as bookmarks.   There is an author/title index and another for genres/themes/activities.   Educators may wish to visit or revisit  RIP-ROARING READS FOR RELUCTANT TEEN READERS. (LU, 93).  This book is an essential purchase for middle and high school media specialists and youth librarians in public libraries who do not have time to keep up with reading as well as those who read voraciously.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Appelt, Kathi and Jeanne Cannella Schmitzer.  DOWN CUT SHIN CREED: THE  PACK
    HORSE LIBRARIANS OF KENTUCKY.
  New York:  HarperCollins,  2001.  58p. 
    0-06-029135-4 hb. $16.95 b 0-06-029244-X  lib.bdg. $16.89.    Gr. 3-7+   027.076

    This book begins with a picture of Grace Caudill Lucas who was a former pack horse librarian.  During the Great Depression, Kentucky was hit hard because it was one of the poorest states in the U.S., especially in the mountainous eastern half.  One of FDR’s Works Projects Administration  programs was the Kentucky Pack Horse Library Project.   The WPA paid for librarians to maintain the headquarters library and to pay women to carry the books into the hollows on horseback and dispense them to individuals and one-room schoolhouses.  The chapter called “Inside the Saddlebags” provides a glimpse of what people were reading ion the 1930s.  The recipes for Ash Cake and Rice Pudding that are included in the book are samples of recipes given to the book women and reflect the unwillingness of the mountain women to take “something for nothing.”   The black and white photos reflect the times and put the text in perspective.  This program, which lasted between 1943 and 1957, was a success.  One legacy was that Perkins, a congressman from Kentucky, sponsored the Library Services Act.  Perkins had been a teacher in a rural county serviced by the Kentucky book women.  The book concludes with an index and a  bibliography of interviews, books, articles, pamphlets, theses, and websites.  This would be a good addition for middle and high school collections where the Great Depression is studied.  Public libraries and university library school collections should also purchase this title.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Dresang, Eliza T. RADICAL CHANGE: BOOKS FOR YOUTH IN A DIGITAL AGE .
    Bronx:   H. W. Wilson, 1999.  344p.  0-8242-0953-2 pb. $45.00   98-34791    NF  028

     If you want to be on the cutting age of reading in the digital age, then you need to read this book.  Dresang, a former school and public librarian, school district library and technology director, now a professor of information studies and developer of a web-based MA program, talks about radical changes in books and readers brought about by electronic media.  Dresang identifies literature that has characteristics of the digital age that are interactive, nonlinear, multilayered, graphic, contain multiple perspectives and unheard voices, or  break barriers in subject, setting, characterization, and endings.  Appendix A contains recommended books published between 1990-98 that reflect this thought.  Appendix B is an overview of ideas about childhood and literature for children from the middle ages to the end of this century.  This is required reading for library/media personnel at all levels K-college.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Harvey, Miles.  THE ISLAND OF LOST MAPS:  A TRUE STORY OF CARTOGRAPHIC 
    CRIME.
  New York: Random House, 2000.   0-375-50151-7 hb. $24.95    00-025604     025.8

    After the Hungarian Revolution, educated immigrants from Central Europe enrolled in American colleges.  Numerous Latvians entered the Library School at Western Michigan University.  One attorney became a law librarian.  Another, probably with a PhD. in history or geography whom we knew as Dr. H---, became a map librarian.  How many media specialists know a map librarian personally?
    After reading this book, librarians of all types will meet map librarians and identify with those whose collections were defaced.   This is a different type of summer reading for MAME members.  It is a combination mystery, thriller, crime stopper, history/geography lesson, psychological drama, and journalists' quest.  Gilbert Bland, under many aliases, was a real thief who razored maps from rare books in research libraries in the U.S. and Canada and was apprehended in 1995.  The reactions of the librarians and their administrators, attorneys, the F.B.I., and the criminal justice system are fascinating but disturbing.  The author is a journalist who wrote a magazine article about Bland and decided to study him in depth.  Harvey shares the world of cartographers, collectors, dealers, auctioneers, and their subculture and juxtapositions them against the history of maps before and during the exploration of the new world and the westward movement within the U.S.  Readers will be astounded by inside information about Marco Polo, Columbus, Magellan, Drake, Sir Walter Raleigh, Benedict Arnold, and John Fremont.  The old black and white maps are a bonus.  Also, read  the children’s book about Eratosthenes, head of the legendary library at Alexandria—Kathryn Lasky’s THE LIBRARIAN WHO MEASURED THE EARTH.   Little, 1994.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Horning, Kathleen.  FROM COVER TO COVER: EVALUATING AND REVIEWING
    CHILDREN'S BOOKS.   New York: HarperCollins, 1997.  0-06-024519-0, hb. $24.95;
    0-06-44617-X, pb.  $12.95.   Adult   028.1  or  801.95      PROFESSIONAL PICK

    This well-know public and university librarian provides criteria for evaluating picture books, easy readers, fiction, nonfiction, folklore, and  poetry.  Source notes and a bibliography for children's  books are included at the ends of each chapter.  Persons interested in critically evaluating children's books will use Horning's book for introductory or refresher collection development, writing reviews, and for understanding the elements of good children's literature.  Teachers of literature at all levels and book lovers will find the book informative.   Horning's book was purchased from LSTA grant funds and given to communities represented at the fourteen workshops on book reviewing conducted by the Superiorland Preview Center.  Libraries who do not own this title need to purchase one.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Hurst, Carol Otis.  OPEN BOOKS:  LITERATURE IN THE CURRICULUM,
    KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 2.  Professional Growth Series.
    Worthington, OH: Linworth, 1999.  266p.  0-938865-77-3, pb. $36.96    372.64

    Hurst provides a summary, comments, items to notice, activities, and related books for each picture book theme; half are about science.  Of the twenty-five author/illustrator studies, three were born in Michigan.  Of the fourteen focus books, two are by Michigan authors.  This is an important purchase for libraries serving primary grades.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Jenkins, Carol Brennan.  THE ALURE OF AUTHORS: AUTHOR STUDIES
    IN THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM. Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann, 1999.
    280p.   0-325-00001-8; pb.  $23.00  A/T/S index.

    Jenkins provides criteria for quality nonfiction, characterization, theme, and more.  Four authors are featured and shorter information is included for four more; there are seventeen author e-mails.  The eight-page professional reference bibliography is impressive while another list includes children’s books.   Advice from third graders to teachers doing author studies is informative.   The author and title/subject indexes are helpful.  Recommended for public libraries or those in elementary and middle schools.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Littlejohn, Carol.  KEEP TALKING THAT BOOK!  BOOKTALKS TO PROMOTE
    READING, VOL. 2. 
Professional Growth Series.  Worthington, OH:  Linworth, 2000. 
    170p.   0-938865-92-7, pb. $36.95    028.9

    Instead of being organized by age categories like the previous book, TALK THAT BOOK: BOOKTALKS TO PROMOTE READING (1999), titles are listed for ages 8 to 80.  Annotations are longer, type is larger, and a list of related books is included.  Like in the previous book, Littlejohn includes bibliographic information, genre, subjects, award or best book lists, notes, and annotations. The author, subject, genre, and age indexes add value to the book.  If you liked the first book, you will also want this one.  This book is an exceptional value for elementary and middle schools, public libraries, and colleges of education, and library school collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Littlejohn, Carol.  TALK THAT BOOK: BOOKTALKS TO PROMOTE READING.
    Worthington, OH:  Linworth, 1999. 165 p.  0-938865-75-7; PB.,$36.95   028.1

    The first chapter gives valuable information about booktalks: strategies, evaluation, and a bibliography of booktalking materials.  The other chapters are devoted to cards that can be cut apart to be used as instant booktalks and are arranged by grade level: 101 for 4-6; 168 for 6-9; 82 for 9+;  and 10 best sellers.  Even if you already have booktalks under control, you can use the cards to put in display books to entice students.   Recommended for school, public, and university collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Matthew, Kathryn I. And Joy L. Lowe.  GUIDE TO RECOMMENDED CHILDREN’S
    BOOKS AND MEDIA FOR USE WITH EVERY ELEMENTARY SUBJECT
.
    New York: Neal-Schuman, 2002.  407p.  1-5570-431-X; pb., $55.00  011.62
 
    Chapters are arranged by subjects: math, science, English language arts, social studies, health, sports, recreation, dance, art, and music.  Each subject is divided into numerous sections.  The math chapter includes types like subtraction and division; the health chapter includes nutrition, feelings, self-esteem, manners, and aging and death; and the social studies is organized from the new world in 1530-1760 to world power from 1945-2001.  The bulk of the book is devoted to annotated bibliographies of books with copyrights which are in the mid and late 1990s.  Some are as new as 2001.  The Explorations section provides broad suggestions for using the books.  There is a set of professional references at the end of each chapter.   Before the bibliography, the introduction provides background for the topic.  For instance the music chapter includes 9 standards from The National Standards for Arts Education (ArtsEdge, 1992).  Besides books, there are CD-ROMs and videos in the bibliographies.  There are subject and author/title indexes.  The appendix includes addresses for journals, professional organizations, Internet sites, videotapes, audio books, and software companies.  Teachers and librarians who saw this book asked to borrow it.  Purchase for library schools and schools of education and elementary building collections.    
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

McElmeel, Sharron L.  100 MOST POPULAR PICTURE BOOK AUTHORS AND
    ILLUSTRATORS: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES.
    Popular Author series.   Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, 2000.  579p.
    1-56308-647-6 hb.  $49.00     Gr. 3+       920  or  810.9

    Up-to-date biographical information, bibliographies, notes, and web sites are included for each person, including six from Michigan.  Authors range from Verna Aardema, Allan and Janet Ahlberg, and Martha Alexander to Jane Yolen, Ed Young, and Margot Zemach.  Most are living but Wanda Gag and Dr. Seuss are some of those who aren’t.  John Sciezka is there but Lane Smith is not.  Most are American, but the Ahlbergs, Beatrix Potter, A. Browne, and Burningham are not.  Graeme Base and Mem Fox are Australian.  Anno Mitsumasa is the only Asian.  African-Americans are well represented but there aren’t any Hispanics.  Author/title and genre indexes conclude the book.  Although it will not be used by elementary students as much as McElmeel’s 100 MOST POULAR CHILDREN’S AUTHORS (2000), it is still important enough to be in elementary reference sections.  Whether or not you can afford the “Something About the Author” series  (Gale) or own the Junior Authors and Illustrators series.  (Wilson), this is an important purchase for elementary, library school, and school of education libraries. Public libraries, especially small ones, will find the book invaluable.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

McElmeel, Sharron L.  100 MOST POPULAR CHILDREN’S AUTHORS:  BIOGRAPHICAL 
    SKETCHES AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES
.  Popular Author series. Englewood, CO: 
    Libraries Unlimited, 2000.  579p.  1-56308-646-8; hb.,  $48.00.   Gr. 3+    920   or   810.9

    Authors range from David Adler, Lloyd Alexander, and Avi to Bety Ren Wright, Elizabeth Yates, and Jane Yolen.  Most are alive but Barrie, Bellairs, Carroll, Ciardi,  Matt Christopher, Kipling, Kjelgaard, Lawson, M.C. Livingston, Milne, Uchida, and E. B. White are no longer living.  Poets include Lee Bennett Hopkins, Paul Janeczko, Shel Silverstein, and Myra Cohn Livingston among others.  All the authors write chapter books for students in grades three to seven except David Wisniewski whose picture books have older themes and characters.   Since the basis for inclusion was on the results of a national 1997 survey designed to identify the 100 most important authors and illustrators in children’s literature, Rowling is not included because the Harry Potter phenomena had not yet hit.
    Author/Title and genre indexes are thorough.  These books will be helpful for student reports in grades three through junior high school. Whether or not libraries can afford the “Something About the Author” series  (Gale) or own the Junior Authors and Illustrators series (Wilson), this is an essential purchase for elementary, library school and school of education libraries.  The price is a boon to small school and public libraries that can’t afford the other series.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

McElmeel, Sharon.  LITERATURE FRAMEWORKS FROM APPLES TO ZOOS .
    Worthington, OH: Linworth, 2001.  182p. 1-58683-060-0; pb., $36.95   372.64  

    The book begins with a dozen “Standards for the English Language Arts.”  Each section includes collaborative themes, project, literature and related activity ideas, and professional books and web sites.  The collaborative themes for “Lighthouses and Their Keepers” includes purposes of lighthouses, locations/mapping, writing letters for information, and building scale models and themes for “Wagons Going West” includes the Westward movement, transportation, and settlers.  There is a project for every letter of the alphabet like quilts, x-rays and other inventions, yo-yos and other childhood games, and zoos and animals.  The appendix includes 29 reproducible graphics to accompany projects.  The indexes are A/T/S and Internet sites. Although no comparison to the 1997 edition was made, many of the copyright dates for the books are late 1990s and 2000.      
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Polette, Nancy J.  GIFTED BOOKS, GIFTED READERS:  LITERATURE
    ACTIVITIES TO EXCITE YOUNG MINDS.  Englewood, CO:
    Libraries Unlimited, 2000.  282p.  1-56308-822-3 pb. $32.50    371.95

    Polette’s activities are always creative and this title is no exception.   University personnel who teach media specialists and teachers, as well as those practitioners in grades 1-5, will use these activities or think of others that apply to their own students and situations.  Sample activities come from picture books, folklore, and classics.  Some of the activities include: creating songs, chants, and poetry; sentence strips and starters; pre-reading questions; questions to think about; rewriting and recalling stories; descriptions; drawing; story strips and starters; diagrams; vocabulary; comparison and contrast; creative and critical thinking; problem solving; imaging; and observation.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Schembri, Pamela.  SCARY STORIES YOU WON’T BE AFRAID TO USE! 
    RESOURCES AND ACTIVITIES FOR A K-6 AUDIENCE
.  Worthington, OH:
    Linworth, 2001.  168p.  1-58683-002-3; pb., $39.95   027.62 

    Early in the book, in a section called “Present the Material,” Schembri provides techniques for avoiding challenges and addresses formal complaints.  Appendix A is devoted to five web sites about selection policy.  Appendix B includes six addresses and 800 numbers for ordering media and lesser-known publishing companies. The bulk of the book is devoted to lesson plans and programs.  Mini lessons include making food, a poetry activity sheet, critical thinking, songs, story pyramids, and sending e-cards.  Each activity includes objectives, resources, materials, procedure, and sometimes an activity sheet.  There are a dozen activity sheets or projects.  There are lessons for language arts, social studies, science, math, technology, and art.  The bulk of the book, from page 46-146, are annotated bibliographies of picture books, story collections, poetry and riddles, series, audiovisual materials, web sites, and professional references.  If a book is also available in audio or video format, then a graphic is included and the bibliographic information is listed in an audiovisual section.  The books are from recommended lists and the source and date for the reviews are given.  The copyright dates for most of the books are the 1900s but a few are from the late 1980s and some are from 2000.  There are subject, title, and author indexes.  Although this is seasonal, it is very useful for elementary building media specialists and children’s librarians in public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Stephens, Claire et. al.   CORETTA SCOTT KING AWARD BOOKS:  USING
    GREAT LITERATURE WITH CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS
.  Englewood,
    CO: Libraries Unlimited, 2000.  238p.  1-56308-685-9; pb., $26.00   016.8

    Winner lists are organized by chronology, genre, and alphabet; some of them annotated.  Biographies, integrated curriculum ideas, activities, and web sites make this an important purchase for media centers serving students K-12, public libraries, and libraries in library schools or colleges of education.  Some projects include vocabulary lists, crossword puzzles, radio plays, word searches, and study questions.  Projects include literary elements such as characterizations, symbolism, and irony.  A dozen full-page biographies with photos are included; however, they are the most famous of the authors; i.e., the McKissick’s, Walter Den Myers, and Virginia Hamilton instead of those that are more difficult to find.  A shorter biography for each person would have better served readers/Librarians in many types of libraries will use this book for identifying and using books by African Americans.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Toor, Ruth and Hilda K. Weisburg.   RAISING READERS:  APPEALING APPROACHES
    & SUCCESSFUL STRATEGIES.
  Berkeley Heights, NJ:  Library Learning Resources,
    1997.  142p.  0-931315-09-3; $22.00   372.43  or  028.5

    This spiral bound book is divided into four types of reading activities.  Part I includes history, forms, certificates, score sheets ideas for questions, rules, list of books from 1984-97 for K-12, and everything you need to execute a Battle of the Books program.  Part II includes 20 "theme-based" units linking literature to all areas of the curriculum.  The units include an annotation of the focus book and a variety of activities about letter writing, fairy tales, history, art, and more.  Part III is about preparing author days and autographing with special information about fivew authors: Jan Brett; Eve Bunting; Barbara Park; William Steig; and Jane Yolen.  Information includes: biographies; book annotations on several grade levels, as well as activities.  Part IV contains five reading incentive programs to reward students for reading books.  The authors are the editors of THE SCHOOL LIBRARIAN'S WORKSHOP, a 20-year-old newsletter which provides school library media specialists with bibliographies, projects, puzzles, poetry;  exchange of ideas, information skills,  technology topics, and web sites for grades K-12.  Elementary media specialists should consider this book but media specialists K-12 can benefit from subscribing to the newsletter.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Voltz, Bridget Dealy, et. al.  JUNIOR GENREFLECTING: A GUIDE TO GOOD READS
    AND SERIES FICTION FOR CHILDREN
. Genreflecting Advisory series.  Englewood,
    CO:  Libraries Unlimited, Inc., 2000.  187p.  1-56308-556-9 pb.  $28.00    016.813

    These titles, 1990 or newer for grades 3-6, are arranged by genre and then by sub topics.  A list of bibliographies consulted and useful web sites are also helpful.  There are author, title, and subject indexes to help identify books in series.   Highly Recommended .
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Wadham, Tim and Rachel L. Wadham.  BRINGING FANTASY ALIVE FOR CHILDREN
    AND YOUNG ADULTS.
   Professional Growth Series.  Worthington, OH: Linworth, 1999. 
    201p.  0-938865-80-3;  pb., $36.95     809.915  or   028

    Definitions, sample lesson outlines, booktalks, programs, storytime suggestions author web sites,  fantasy sites, listserves, biographical sketches, and annotated book lists of picture and chapter books are listed by grade level.  This well organized book provides practical ways to introduce fantasy for elementary and middle school students. Author, title, and general indexes conclude the book.  Harry Potter makes this book even more relevant.   Highly recommended for professional collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

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031 ENCYCLOPEDIAS

Jackson, Tom.  ZANY MISCELLANY: A MIXED-UP ENCYCLOPEDIA OF FUN FACTS!  
      
New York, NY:  Scholastic, 2008. 112p. ISBN:  9780545053334 hb. $14.99    Gr. 5+    031.02

       Who would have thought learning could be so fun! Lots of color, variety of factual displays; from nerd words to factoids to wormholes and goof-a-thons to people-opoly to factpiles.  At first glance, the amount of information on each page can be overwhelming, but kids can flit from fact to fact as it catches their eye or read all the wormholes then go to factpiles.  Recommended for Gr. 5 and up, including adults.
       Charlotte Dugas, Library Director, Munising School and Public Library

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100 PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY

Brown, Laura K.  HOW TO BE A FRIEND: A GUIDE TO MAKING FRIENDS
    AND KEEPING THEM. Illus. by Marc Brown.  New York: Little, 1998.  32p.
    0-316-10913-4, hb.,  $14.95.  97-10179  PreS-Gr.3.  158.2

    The team that successfully created DINOSAUR'S DIVORCE (Little, 1988) has done it again.  Using a similar format, the Browns have shared accessible, non-didactic tools for children to learn about making and keeping friends.  Library collections are not complete without the divorce book and won't be without this one.  An elementary counselor noted that "kids were attracted to the illustrations in this useful, high interest information book for children."  One of the main attractions for a counselor is that "it is a great book to read with kids to stimulate  discussion.   The Browns deal with conflict resolution and problem solving and provide children with information about making and being a friend and accepting differences in others in a realistic manner."  Teachers, counselors, and parents can use it with individual students, small groups, or and in classrooms.  "I loved the book and have already used it with several children.  I plan to get a copy for my room.  Highly Recommend for all children, beginners and experts,  because everyone needs to learn about friendship."
     Guest reviewer:  Nancy Olson; Counselor, Lakeview Elementary School, Negaunee, MI

Finn, Carrie.  MANNERS IN THE LIBRARY.  Illus. by Chris Lensch.  Minneapolis, MN:  Picture Window 
    Books, 2007.  24p. 
ISBN: 978-1-4048-3152-0 lib.bdg. $17.95    Gr. K-3     j179

            This series is very useful for discussing good manners and acceptable behavior with Kindergartners. There is rationale for each behavior and good references at the end of the book.  Lensch’s illustrations feature very interesting characters with large expressive faces and little stick bodies.
             Bettina Graber, Library Trustee, Munising School Public Library

Nettleton, Pamela.   IS THAT TRUE?  KIDS TALK ABOUT HONESTY.  Illus. Amy Muehlenhardt.  
          Bloomington, MN:  Picture Window Books, 2005.  32p.  ISBN 1-4048-0619-9 hb. $23.93   Gr. 3-6   j179.9
          Mimicking the “Dear Abby” column in the newspapers, a fictional middleschooler named Frank B. Wize takes it upon 
himself to answer questions and give advice to kids about a variety of moral topics such as cheating, lying, and other more serious 
topics that deal with their communities and the world.  Frank answers hand written questions and types up his responses on his 
computer before submitting them for publication.  This journalistic style would appeal to the upper elementary grades.  The colorful
illustrations express the anxiety, frustration, and relief that become evident when dealing with problems honestly.  
	Amy Becker, Technical Services Librarian, Peter White Public Library

Riehecky, Janet.  RESPECT.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone, 2005.  24p.  ISBN 0736836829 
            hb. $15.95    Gr. 1-3     j179.9

             Without preaching, this book emphasizes the importance of respect for other people, cultures, and ideas.  Children are shown ineveryday situations were respect is a necessity.  Bright color photographs illustrate the concept.
            Lynn Dragoo, Spies Public Library, Menominee, MI

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100 DEATH

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130 PARANORMAL PHENOMENA

Gravelle, Karen.  FIVE WAYS TO KNOW ABOUT YOU.  Illus. Mary Lynn Blausutta. New York:
    Walker, 2001.  166p.  0-8027-8749-5 hb. $16.95   0-8027-7586-1 pb.  $10.95    Gr. 4-9     j133.3

    There are five topics addressed in this title:  astrology (stars); palm reading (hands); numerology, (numbers); Chinese horoscopes (animals); and handwriting analysis (writing). Cooper says,  “Since childhood, I have enjoyed reading about and exploring these topics and similar ones.  Only palm reading was a new area for me.”  Cooper says this book is “an excellent overview of the five topics.  This book is VERY CLEAR, a good beginning primer on the subjects presented, written in a personal, matter-of-fact” and “to-the-point” style that I can easily see a child reading, as well as interested adults.  Also it has a nice ‘suggested reading list’ for delving further, without getting too lengthy.”
    Roslyn Cooper, Co-owner of Harmony Books and Gifts, Marquette, MI
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
 

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133 GHOSTS

HAUNTED HOTELS. New York: Bearport, 2008.  32p. ISBN: 9781597165747 hb.
      $25.27.    Gr. 3-6    JUV NF  133.1

      Although not for every reader, this is a good choice for Halloween! It gives the background of hotel deaths and murders and the first hand encounters that guests experience with the ghosts that reside there. Spooky and informative.
      Liana Graves, 4-H Educator, Alger County Extension, Munising School Public Library

Wilson, Colin.   GHOSTS AND THE SUPERNATURAL.   Illus with photos.  New York:   
    Dorling Kindersley, 1998.  38 p. 0-7894-2819-9      Gr. 5-+      133.1

     Wilson's book is sure to send chills up the spine of any creepy creature connoisseur. The author defines and explains ghosts, phantoms, angels, werewolves and all of their supernatural friends with testimonials, pictures, and folklore. The reader gets to squeal at pictures of "real" ectoplasm on one page and laugh at Hollywood's fictional Ghost Busters a few pages later. This is a fun book for upper elementary, middle school kids, and even adults.  It will satisfy curiosity and quench the appetite while enticing the reader to search for the "ghostly truth."
    Charlotte Oshe, Children's Assistant,  Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
 

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133.4 WITCHCRAFT

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133.8 ESP -- and PSYCHIC PHENOMENA

Wilson, Colin.  PSYCHIC POWERS. Illus by photos.  New York: DK, 1998.
     37 p. 0-7894-2820-2   97-44359   Grades 5+ 133

     Dare to open this mind-reading book and find out about psychics!  Read about people who can do strange things with their minds; people who can make small objects move (psychokinesis); people who can float in the air (levitation); or people who even walk on red hot coals without getting burned. The book touches on gifts and curses, the spirit world, saints and healers, looking into the beyond and much more. Colin Wilson does an effective job in combining the easy-to-understand text with fascinating photographs. Psychic Powers will capture the interest of any reader old enough to understand the title. It does not try to explain the bizarre things that it describes, (that would be beyond expectation) but it will show that these weird things really happen and that the world is far stranger than most people care to believe.
    Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
 
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