Dewey Guide: 700s

Subjects Listed in This Directory

 


700 THE ARTS

Gaff, Jackiei.  1900-10: FROM IMPPRESSIONISM AND FAUVISM TO EXPRESSIONISM AND CUBISM.  
    20th Century Art series.  Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 2001. 32p.  0-83682848-8 lib.bdg. $22.60   Gr. 3-9+    709.04

    This series, first published in Great Britain in 2000, provides a quick and lively overview of the decade according to the art world.  The locations of the paintings or sculptures are provided at the beginning of the book while information about the art movement or artist with a brief biography is included.  The book concludes with a time line of the decade, glossary, book and web site bibliographies, and an index.  The illustrations, photos, paintings, sculptures, and text are placed in artistic patterns on each double-page spread although the first item in each begins with a description of the movement or a brief biography of the featured artist.
    Included in this book are Impressionism and Monet; Pointilism and Seurat; Van Gogh; Expressionism and Munch with information about Freud; Symbolism and Klimit and Art Nouveau; Fauvism and Derain; Matisse, the “King of Color;” Northern Expressionism and Kirchner; Les Demoiselles D'Avignon and Picasso; Cezanne; Cubism and Braque, and Brancusi.  Although an artist is featured for each movement, there is a list of other artists who painted during that time period.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Gaff, Jackiei.  1910-20: THE BIRTH OF ABSTRACT ART; FROM FUTURISM  AND DADA 
    TO SUPPREMATISM AND CONSTRUCTIVISM.
  20th Century Art series.  Milwaukee: 
    Gareth Stevens, 2001.  32p.   0-8368-2849-6lib.bdg., $22.90   Gr. 3-9+   709.04

    This series, first published in Great Britain in 2000, provides a quick and lively overview of the decade.  The locations of the paintings or sculptures are provided at the beginning of the book while information about the art movement or artist with a brief biography is included.  The book concludes with a time line of the decade, glossary, book and web site bibliographies, and an index.  The illustrations, photos, paintings, sculptures, and text are placed in artistic patterns on each double-page spread although the first item in each begins with a description of the movement or a brief biography of the featured artist.
    Included in this book are turbulent times during World War I including Rodchenko; Cubist Constructions with Braque and Gris; Cubisim in Color with Delaunay; Kandinsky; Futurism with Boccioni and Balla; Vorticism with Bomberg; Artists at War in World War I with Lewis; Dada, and Duchamp; De Cirico's Metaphysical Painting; Modigliani; Mondrain; Suprematism and Malevicih; and Constructivism with Rodchenko and Tatlin.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Gaff, Jackiei.  1920-40: REALISM AND SURREALISM; FROM REALISM AND REGIONALISM 
    TOO SURREALISM AND DEGENERATE ART
. 20th Century Art series. Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 2001.  
    32p.  0-8368-2850-X; lib.bdg., $22.60   Gr. 3-9+   709.04

    This series, first published in Great Britain in 2000, provides a quick and lively overview of one for more decades.  The locations of the paintings or sculptures are provided at the beginning of the book while information about the art movement or artist with a brief biography is included.  The book concludes with a time line of the decade, glossary, book and web site bibliographies, and an index.  The illustrations, photos, paintings, sculptures, and text are placed in artistic patterns on each double-page spread although the first item in each begins with a description of the movement or a brief biography of the featured artist.
    Included are: Changes after Word War I; The Bauhaus and Gropius; New Objectivity with Grosz and Dix; Stanley Spencer; Moore and Hepworth, Abstract Sculptors; Realisim and Wood ; Georgia O'Keeffe; Mexican Muralists with Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueiros; Beyond Reality with Breton and Ernst; International Surrealism with Ernst, Magritte, and Miro; Salvador Dali; Picasso's Guernica; and Art of Repression with Wissel.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Gaff, Jackiei. 1940-60: EMOTION AND EXPRESSION; FROM ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM TO 
    ART BRUT AND THE BIRTH OF POP ART
.   20th Century Art series. Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 2001.  
    32p.  0-8368-2851-8; lib.bdg., $22.60    Gr. 3-9+   709.09

    This series, first published in Great Britain in 2000, provides a quick and lively overview of one or more decade.  The locations of the paintings or sculptures are provided at the beginning of the book while information about the art movement or artist with a brief biography is included.  The book concludes with a time line of the decade, glossary, book and web site bibliographies, and an index.  The illustrations, photos, paintings, sculptures, and text are placed in artistic patterns on each double-page spread although the first item in each begins with a description of the movement or a brief biography of the featured artist.
    World War II and after was a time of tension.  Included are: Sculpture of Alberto Giacometti; Francis Bacon; Jackson Pollock; Born in the USA, Abstract Expressionism; Action Painting with Guggenheim; De Kooning, ; Color Field Painting with Rothko; American Sculpture with David Smith, Nevelson; Jean Dubuffet; Art Masters with Hartung; Jasper Johns; Robert Rauschenberg; and the Birth of Pop inlcuding Paolozzi and Hamilton.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Lacey, Sue. LANDSCAPES, UNDERSTANDING ART WITH LOTS OF PRACTICAL STEP-BY-STEP 
    PROJECTS FOR THE YOUNG ARTIST
.  Start with Art series. Brookfield, CT:  Copper Beech, 2000. 32p.    
    0-7613-0843-1; pb., $6.95    0-7613-1167-X; lib.bdg., $22.90   Gr. 3-9+     704.9

    A picture by a master, accompanied by title and dates of the artists, is surrounded with comments about the picture.  A paragraph about the artists' life appears on that page.  The opposite page shows readers how they can create a picture with a medium similar to that of the master.  Each of the dozen artists' works represents a technique that is the heading for those two pages.  The artists are: Monet, light; Ceznne, composition and color; Van Gogh, movement/color; Seurat, Gauguin, colors/shapes;  Constable, weather and skies;  Turner, seascapes; Kandinsky, shapes; Renoir, light/color; Dali, surrealism; Hokusai, wood block printing; and Morisot, charcoal sketching.  A glossary and index conclude the book.  This book provides an easy way to understand the medium used by art masters as well as introduces famous paintings to children as well as adults.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Leroux-Hugon, Helene. I CAN DRAW COUNTRY ANIMALS.  I Can Draw Animals Series.
    Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 2001.  40p.  0-8368-2838-0 lib bdg. $21.27   Gr. 2-5    743.6

    In each book in this series, which was originally written in French, the author begins by giving directions for drawing, then touches on observation and practice.   Her drawing by steps is reminiscent of the many books by Lee Ames which begin DRAWING 50…  and are published by Doubleday.    Leroux-Hugon begins with an oval for each of the following animals: cats, dogs, birds in a nest, chicks, ducks, rabbits, squirrels, sheep, cows, donkeys, and the horned owl.   The format is the same for introducing all animals.  Three ovals show how to add details and pictures on one side of the page, the opposite side contains descriptions of the animals.  Leroux-Hugon would have been more successful if she had stayed with that format instead of adding sections on seasons.   The animals in those pictures represent only some of the animals in the previous section.  After the first three animals, the author shows a picture called “Spring in the Garden” that shows the dog playing with a ball and birds in a tree or flying about but does not include the cats.  The description of spring talks about birds migrating home but has no connection to cats and dogs.  After the next three animals, the author shows chickens white ducks unlike those described earlier, and rabbits in a picture called “The Meadow in Summer.”  Since chickens do not typically live in meadows, this is unusual.  After the next three animals there is a picture called “The Orchard in Fall” which shows only cows, squirrels, and trees.  Sheep are not included, probably because sheep and dairy cattle are not often shown in the same pasture or in orchards.  After the donkey and owl are introduced there is a picture called “The Forest in Winter” which includes the owl, a snowman, other birds, but no donkey.  Readers also wonder what an owl and donkey have in common with winter in the first place.  If the author had only presented her techniques for drawing the animals without including the seasons, the book would have been better served.
    A bibliography of books, two videos and two web sites, and a glossary/index complete the book.  Libraries who already own similar books may wish to pass on these poorly organized books.  Although the pages about drawing the animals are well written and explained through words and illustrations, the attempt to make these books more than drawing books is not successful.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Leroux-Hugon, Helene.  I CAN DRAW FOREST ANIMALS.  I Can Draw Animals Series.
    Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 2001.  40p. 0-8368-2839-9; lib bdg., $21.27    Gr. 2-5      743.6

    Originally published in French, this book contains three-step directions for drawing animals beginning with an oval shape and then adding details. The drawing by steps is reminiscent of the many books by Lee Ames which begin DRAWING 50… (Doubleday).  The forest animals include: a doe and fawn; wild boar; pheasant; fox; badgers; hedgehog; dormouse; toad; woodpecker; marten; and the Stag Beetle.  Children studying the deciduous forest can determine which of these animals live in the forests in their own countries.   The book also attempts to tell about habitats.  After every third animal there is a double page spread showing where these animals might live, in a clearing, in a burrow, on the ground, or in a tree.  Since the pheasant probably lives in hedge or fence rows and the deer and wild boar probably do not stand in the meadow together, this part of the book is not successful.  The best example is the creatures that live in the trees.  However, taken together, these connecting pages are not successful and detract from the book.  Purchase only if artistic material on this subject is needed. A bibliography of books, two videos and two web sites, a glossary/index complete the book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Leroux-Hugon, Helene.  I CAN DRAW POLAR ANIMALS.  I Can Draw Animals Series.
    Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 2001.  40p. 0-8368-2840-2; lib bdg., $21.27    Gr. 2-5      743.6

    The author begins by giving directions for drawing and touches on observation and practice in this title which was originally published in French.  The drawing by steps is reminiscent of the many books by Lee Ames which begin DRAWING 50… (Doubleday).   After a list of drawing instructions, the author shows readers in three steps, using ovals, how to draw the following animals: polar bears, seals, walruses, musk ox, wolf, reindeer, penguins, sea elephant, albatross, whale, narwhal.  The first three animals are identified as coming from the Arctic or North Pole in a paragraph that accompanies a picture of all of the animals.  The next three animals are in a group picture with an explanation of the Tundra.  Having seen reindeer in the Tundra, this one looks slightly out of proportion.  The next three are located in the Antarctica and the last two are from the oceans at both poles.  The explanation of the geographic areas is better explained and integrated into this book than in the other books in the series.  It also translates better to Americans, probably because the poles are not part of either country.  This book will work well with classes that are studying the poles.  A bibliography of six books, two videos and two web sites, a glossary/index complete the book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Leroux-Hugon, Helene.  I CAN DRAW WILD ANIMALS.  I Can Draw Animals Series.
    Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 2001.  40p.  0-8368-2841-0 lib. bdg. $21.27   Gr. 2-5   743.6

    In this book, which was originally published in French, the author begins by giving directions for drawing which includes observation and practice.  The drawing by steps is reminiscent of the many books by Lee Ames which begin DRAWING 50… (Doubleday).  A bibliography of books, two videos and two web sites, a glossary/index complete the book.
Leroux-Hugon shows three diagrams for completing the following animals:  hippos, crocodiles, horned rhinos, elephants, giraffes, lions, gazelles, and more.  Under the completed animal there is a description of each animal.  At the end of the first grouping of animals the author talks about the African Grasslands or savanna and mentions that elephants, giraffes, and zebras live there in herds but does not describe the elephants that are in the picture.  The book has problems in organization.  The information about the grasslands should have preceded the information about those animals.   The next animal is a camel that precedes a page about the Sahara desert.   The camel pictured is the Camelus dromedarius which is commonly called the dromedary which is found in Arabian deserts while the camelus bactaarianus is an Asiatic animal.  Although a dromedary is a type of camel, it might have been easier to call it a dromedary or dromedary camel to avoid confusion about whether it should have one hump or two.  Diagrams showing how to draw the hornbill and chimpanzees precede a section about the African Rain Forests.  Despite the organizational problems, the art techniques will help children.   If introduced with units about the grasslands or the rain forest, children need to be told how to sort out which animals belong where.    A bibliography of books, two videos and two web sites, a glossary/index complete the book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Morrison, Taylor.  THE BUFFALO NICKEL. Illus by the author.  Boston:  Walter
    Lorraine, 2002.  32p.   0-618-10855-6; hb., $16.00    Gr. 3-7    730.92

    This combination biography and coin picture book about James Fraser begins when he grew up on the Dakota Territory where he heard many stories about the buffalo and the Indians who hunted them.  As a young boy, he carved chalkstone.  As an adult, he created the famous sculpture, The End of the Trail, showing a Native American, “an exhausted brave on a weary horse.”  Fraser studied in Paris with Augustus Saint-Gaudens, who was commissioned by President Theodore Roosevelt to create some American coins but Saint-Gaudens died before the coins were minted.  Eventually James was given the opportunity to create the raised nickel, now known as the “Buffalo Nickel,” a coin that stayed in circulation over 25 years.  Readers learn how a coin is created and manufactured.  Even the politics of the situation is discussed.  The illustrations are clear and expressive.  There is a complete bibliography and a glossary at the end of the book.  This excellent picture book combines art, history, biography, and money.  This unusual book is an important purchase for all types of libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Nilsen, Anna.  ART AUCTION MYSTERY.  Boston, MA:  Kingfisher Books, 2005.  
               48p.  ISBN 0-7534-5842-X hb. $16.95.  Gr. 4-8    j759

               What starts out as a graphic novel becomes a reference tool for learning about great works of art.  Readers 
try to detect the fake art from the authentic pieces at an art auction by using a reference guide with split pages throughout 
most of the book.  The forgeries are tricky, the reproductions are beautiful, and this book is fun.  It's a grown-up twist 
on Walter Wick's "I Spy" books.  I can confidently recommend this book for public, classroom, and personal libraries.  
               Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Oliver, Clare.  1960-80: EXPERIMENTS AND NEW DIRECTIONS; FROM OP AND POP ART TO 
    SUPER-REALISM, MINIMALISM, AND CONCEPTUAL ART.  20th Century Art series. Milwaukee:  
    Gareth Stevens, 2001.  32p.    0-8368-2851-8; lib.bdg., $22.60   Gr. 3-9+   709.04

    This series, first published in Great Britain in 2000, provides a quick and lively overview of  one or more decades.  The locations of the paintings or sculptures are provided at the beginning of the book while information about the art movement or artist with a brief biography is included.  The book concludes with a time line of the decade, glossary, book and web site bibliographies, and an index.  The illustrations, photos, paintings, sculptures, and text are placed in artistic patterns on each double-page spread although the first item in each begins with a description of the movement or a brief biography of the featured artist.
    Topics include: Revolutions in Art during the 60s and 70s; Move it with Russian Constructivists and Calder; Op Art with Anuszkiewicz and Vasarely; American Pop Art with Warhol; British Pop with Clark and Hockney; Art as Idea with Barthes and Kosuth; Invisible Art with Manoni; Art's Happening with Gilbert and George; Land Art with Christo and Jeanne-Claude; Less is More/Minimalist Art with Andre; Really Real with Hanson and Close; Australian Art with Tjapaltjarri; Latin American Art with Marguerita.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Oliver, Clare.  1980-2000:  NEW MEDIA, NEW MESSAGES; FROM NEO-EXPRESSIONISM 
    AND GRAFFITI ART TO KITSCH, VIDEO, AND DIGITAL ART
.  20th Century Art series.  
    Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 2001.  32p.  0-8368-2853-4; lib.bdg., $22.60   Gr. 3-9+    709.04

    This series, first published in Great Britain in 2000, provides a quick and lively overview of one or more decades.  The locations of the paintings or sculptures are provided at the beginning of the book while information about the art movement or artist with a brief biography is included.  The book concludes with a time line of the decade, glossary, book and web site bibliographies, and an index.  The illustrations, photos, paintings, sculptures, and text are placed in artistic patterns on each double-page spread although the first item in each begins with a description of the movement or a brief biography of the featured artist.
    Some concepts include: Using Words in Art with Sean Landers; Utilizing Negative Space with Anish Kapoor; Abstract Colors with Patric Heron or Gerhard Richter; Art and Emotion with Anselm Kiefer or Neo-Expressionists; Bad Painting with Juliain Schnabel; Graffiti Art with Jean-Michel Basquiat and others; Large Sculptures with Louise Bourgeois; Bold Materials with Damien Hirst; Kitch Culture with Jeff Koones; Art and Photography with Andreas Gursky; Video Art with Nam June Paik; and Computer-age Art with Jake Tilson.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Raczka, Bob.  NO ONE SAW:  ORDINARY THINGS THROUGH THE EYES OF AN ARTIST.  
    Illus by masters.  Brookfiekd, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  32p.  0-7613-2370-8; lib.bdg., $22.90   0-7613-1648-5; hb., $17.95
    2001-1030006     Gr. 3-8+     759.06

    This beautiful book begins with a double page spread of a flower accompanied by the following text:  "No one saw flowers like Georgia O'Keeffe."  The following pages use the same pattern to show apples by Cezanne, soup by Warhol, mothers by Cassatt, dancers by Degas and introduce the styles of Cezanne, Chagall, Kandinsky, Klee, Magritte, Mior', Mondriain, Monet, Renoir, Seurat, Van Gogh, and Wood.  A list of the 16 paintings appears at the end of the book with the title of the work, the date, and the artist.  The note about each artist shows a small picture, the artist's name with phonetic spelling, birth and death dates, and a four or five line brief biography.  The photo credits provide the art medium (most are oil on canvas) and location of the paintings.  Use this book with pages of Paulin's CREATIVE USES OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (1982).
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Rohmer, Harriet.  HONORING OUR ANCESTORS:  STORIES AND PICTURES BY
    FOURTEEN ARTISTS.  San Francisco, CA: Children's Book Press, 1999.  32p.
    0-89239-158-8; hb., $15.95.     98-38686     Gr. 4-6+    759.13    or   920

    Fourteen artists from many cultures write and portray real or spiritual ancestors.  A list of all of them along with their mediums are listed.  The artists are Carl Angel, Asian; Enrique Chagoya, Hispanic; George Crespo, Puerto Rican; Mark Dukes, African American;  Maya Christina Gonzalez, Hispanic; Caryl Henry, Africani American; Nancy Hom, Chinese; Hung Liu, Chinese; Judith Lowry, Native American; Stephen Von Mason, African American; Mira Reisberg, Jewish; JoeSam Trinidad; Pattsi Valdz, Hispanic; and Helen Zughaib. Lebanese. This is a celebration of multiculturalism as well as can be used to encourage children to write and illustrate people they admire.  Art teachers can use this book to show various art mediums can make use of this book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
 
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720 ARCHITECTURE

Greenberg, Jan and Sandra Jordan.  FRANK O. GEHRY: OUTSIDE IN.  Illus with photos. 
    New York:  Dorling Kindersley, 2000.  48p.  0-7894-2677-3; hb., $19.95.  Gr. 5-12+    720.92
   
    This handsome book is laid out as carefully and aesthetically as a beautifully designed building.  Readers learn about the personal and professional life of the guru of modern architecture, Frank O. Gehry, as well as the types of buildings he created.  Sidebars of white letters on black also impart such information as how to look at a building and how and why Gehry’s house is probably different from most homes.  Especially useful are the glossary, locations and names of his buildings (completed or in progress) and a bibliography of books and articles.  There is no index.
    Quirk says “The text and photographs combine to give an accurate presentation of Frank Gehry’s career and style.  From his sketches through his models and the final structures, his highly creative work is well represented [although] the size and binding present some clipping at the gutters [of photos.]”  “While a beginner could enjoy the content and creativity of Frank Gehry’s work, someone familiar with trends in architectural movements and his unique creative forms would best appreciate the book.  While interested in architecture as a child, this would not have been a first pick book for me.”  Quirk’s recommendation is that “anyone interested in American architectural development in the twentieth century should read this book.  I would highly recommend it to any student seeking information on contemporary architects or anyone with an interest in contemporary architecture, especially the unique and custom forms.”
     GUEST REVIEWER:  James A. Quirk, MFA,  37 years of teaching the arts at the high school and college level

Longtine, Sonny and Laverne Chappell.  MARQUETTE: THEN AND NOW, FASCINATING
    VIGNETTE'S OF MARQUETTE'S PROGRESS TO THE PRESENT
. Illus. with photos. 
    Marquette: North Shore Publications, 1999.  255p.  0-9670793-C-6; pb., $26.98 Gr. 7+   977.4  
    North Shore Publications,  P. O. Box 474, Marquette, MI 49855   Fax: 906-226-6568 
   
    The authors have arranged this look at buildings in one of the largest cities in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan according to activities and then by the places where those activities took place.  The authors have provided colorful names for categories which include the following:   harbor;  livelihood;  homes; churches; civic (including schools); and recreation.  Cemeteries and a categories called "Murder & Mayhem and "Games and Gaieties" are especially interesting.  A glossary of architectural terms is included.   This book, intended for adults, should be purchased for adult collections around the Upper Peninsula and in other areas of the state concerned with architecture and key Michigan cities.  The heavier paper, which helps to give the photographs their high quality, drags on the glued binding and librarians will have trouble binding the book as a hardcover because the inner margins are not large enough for rebinding. Although intended for adults, the book has a side benefit.  The excellent lay-out, including lots of white spaces and sidebars with blue backgrounds that appear on every page and the organization by type of activity, makes this book an excellent manual for fourth grade teachers of Michigan History throughout the state.   Upper Peninsula  children will find it even more interesting because they may have visited Marquette.  Using this book as a guide, teachers can send out teams of students with instamatics, digital or video cameras to photograph areas of their own town.  The end product can either be a book of photos with captions, web page, or video production.  Even if a classroom investigated types of establishments listed in one chapter a year, the project would be extensive.  Other educational uses are by home schoolers or for multigrade projects.  These projects would be suitable for junior and senior high school students also.  Fourth graders are especially mentioned here because that is where Michigan History is placed in the state curriculum.   Longtine and Chappell have included photos of buildings "then and now" which can serve as models to help students when  interviewing current owners of buildings and making trips to research facilities to find photos of buildings from the past for their own communities.   This photographic essay of a  historic Michigan community deserves shelf space in personal and library collections.
        Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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730 SCULPTURE -- POTTERY; CARVING; MOSAICS

Morrison, Taylor.  THE BUFFALO NICKEL.  Illus by author.  Boston:  Lorraine/Houghton, 2002.  
    32p.   0-618-10855-6; hb., $16.00  2001-039537   Gr. 3-7     730.9

    This combination biography and coin picture book about James Fraser begins when he grew up in the Dakota Territory where he heard many stories about the buffalo and the Indians who hunted them.  Even as a young boy, he carved chalkstone.  As an adult, he created the famous sculpture, The End of the Trail, showing a Native American, “an exhausted brave on a weary horse.”  Fraser studied in Paris with Augustus Saint-Gaudens, who was commissioned by President Theodore Roosevelt to create some American coins, but Saint-Gaudens died before the coins were minted.  Eventually James was given the opportunity to create the raised nickel, now known as the “Buffalo Nickel,” a coin which stayed in circulation over 25 years.  Readers learn how a coin is created and manufactured.  Even the politics of the situation is discussed.  The illustrations are clear and expressive.  There is a complete bibliography and a glossary at the end of the book.  This excellent picture book combines art, history, biography, and money.  This unusual book is an important purchase for all types of libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Rau, Dana Meachen.  MOUNT RUSHMORE.  Let’s See series.  Minneapolis: Compass
    Point, 2002.  24p.  0-7565-0141-5; lib.bdg., $18.60   2001-001590   Gr. 1-3       978.3

    Items in dark print appear at the glossary at the end of the book with a list of five books, two web sites, two mail addresses, and an index.  Photos appear on every other page.  The text conveys lots of information and answers the following questions:  Who are the four faces? Who carved the faces? How was it carved? What were problems during carving the sculpture? How big is it?   How can people visit the site?  There are lots of names that could have used phonetic interpretations.  This is an interesting book that can be used when studying South Dakota, presidents, or National Parks.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
 

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739.72 WEAPONS

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737.4 COINS

Morrison, Taylor.  THE BUFFALO NICKEL. Illus by author.  Boston: Walter Lorraine, 2002.  32p.  
    ISBN 0-618-10855-6; hb., $16.00  2001-039537    Gr. 3-7     730.92

    This combination biography and coin picture book about James Fraser begins when he grew up on the Dakota Territory where he heard many stories about the buffalo and the Indians who hunted them.  As a young boy, he carved chalkstone.  As an adult, he created the famous sculpture, The End of the Trail, showing a Native American, “an exhausted brave on a weary horse.”  Fraser studied in Paris with Augustus Saint-Gaudens, who was commissioned by President Theodore Roosevelt to create some American coins but Saint-Gaudens died before the coins were minted.  Eventually James was given the opportunity to create the raised nickel, now known as the “Buffalo Nickel,” a coin that stayed in circulation over 25 years.  Readers learn how a coin is created and manufactured.  Even the politics of the situation is discussed.  The illustrations are clear and expressive.  There is a complete bibliography and a glossary at the end of the book.  This excellent picture book combines art, history, biography, and money.  This unusual book is an important purchase for all types of libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Sullivan, George.  PICTURING LINCOLN: FAMOUS PHOTOGRAPHS THAT
    POPULARIZED THE PRESIDENT.  New York:  Clarion, 2000.  88p.
    0-395-91682-8; hb., $16.00    00-027576    Gr. 4-9+    973.7   or     92

    Sullivan takes a different approach to this popular president; he shares Lincoln through his photos and portraits.  Photography had just been invented when Lincoln had his first portrait in 1846 with a daguerreotype.  In order to reproduce likenesses, engravers made wood blocks or stone lithographs based on the photos and used them for newspapers, magazines, fliers, postcards, posters, medals, and campaign buttons.  Many engravings were based on Hesler’s photo of Lincoln with the uncombed hair, which became known as the “Wigwam print.”  Many of the other photos had names like the “Cooper Union likeness” that was distributed for the campaign of 1860.  Family portraits weer included as well as mementos after Lincoln’s death.
    People interested in postage stamps and coins will also be interested in this book that contains information about Lincoln’s likenesses for those mediums.  The first Lincoln penny was produced in 1909 and pictures of both sides are shown.  A large 2000 Lincoln penny appears on the back cover of the book.  Information about the five-dollar bill portrait is included--both the old one and the new one introduced in 2000.   There are chapter notes, a list of a dozen books, and an index that uses italic numbers to refer to illustrations or captions.   The writing is smooth, the illustrations are clear, and the book can be read all the way through or just selected areas of interest.  This book has many uses; it is a good book for Presidents’ Day, history, elections, biography, stamps, and coins.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center
 

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740 DRAWINGS

Emberley, Ed.  ED EMBERLEY’S DRAWING BOOK OF TRUCKS AND TRAINS.
     Boston: Little, 2002. 32p. 0-316-23898-8 hb.$15.95   0-316-23786-8 pb.$6.95    K-Gr.   741.2

    Using his successful formula, Emberley shows how simple lines and shapes  create old and new engines, a variety of train cars, a station, a trolley, pick-up trucks pulling a variety of boats and campers, vans, and heavy trucks.  The last page in incongruous because it shows people playing sports, cats, birds, and expressive faces.  Nevertheless, this an important library inclusion for those who love trucks and trains.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Leroux-Hugon, Helene.  I CAN DRAW FOREST ANIMALS.  I Can Draw Animals Series.
    Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 2001.  40p. 0-8368-2839-9; lib bdg., $21.27    Gr. 2-5     743.6

    Originally published in French, this book contains three-step directions for drawing animals beginning with an oval shape and then adding details. The drawing by steps is reminiscent of the many books by Lee Ames which begin DRAWING 50… (Doubleday).  The forest animals include: a doe and fawn; wild boar; pheasant; fox; badgers; hedgehog; dormouse; toad; woodpecker; marten; and the Stag Beetle.  Children studying the deciduous forest can determine which of these animals live in the forests in their own countries.   The book also attempts to tell about habitats.  After every third animal there is a double page spread showing where these animals might live, in a clearing, in a burrow, on the ground, or in a tree.  Since the pheasant probably lives in hedge or fence rows and the deer and wild boar probably do not stand in the meadow together, this part of the book is not successful.  The best example is the creatures that live in the trees.  However, taken together, these connecting pages are not successful and detract from the book.  Purchase only if artistic material on this subject is needed. A bibliography of books, two videos and two web sites, a glossary/index complete the book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Leroux-Hugon, Helene.  I CAN DRAW POLAR ANIMALS.  I Can Draw Animals series.
    Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 2001.  40p. 0-8368-2840-2 lib bdg., $21.27    Gr. 2-5      743.6

    The author begins by giving directions for drawing and touches on observation and practice in this title which was originally published in French.  The drawing by steps is reminiscent of the many books by Lee Ames which begin DRAWING 50… (Doubleday).   After a list of drawing instructions, the author shows readers in three steps, using ovals, how to draw the following animals: polar bears, seals, walruses, musk ox, wolf, reindeer, penguins, sea elephant, albatross, whale, and narwhal.  The first three animals are identified as coming from the Arctic or North Pole in a paragraph that accompanies a picture of all of the animals.  The next three animals are in a group picture with an explanation of the Tundra.  Having seen reindeer in the Tundra, this one looks slightly out of proportion.  The next three are located in the Antarctica and the last two are from the oceans at both poles.  The explanation of the geographic areas is better explained and integrated into this book than in the other books in the series.  It also translates better to Americans, probably because the poles are not part of either country.  This book will work well where classes are studying the poles.  A bibliography of six books, two videos and two web sites, a glossary/index complete the book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
 

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741.5 CARTOONS

Nardo, Don.  WALT DISNEY.  Illus. with photos. The Importance Of series. San Diego: 
    Lucent, 2000.   96p.  1-56006-605-9; lib.bdg., $23.70     Gr. 6-9      791.43

     Although he is known for his animated cartoons, Nardo also gives attention to Disney's  life-action adventures, live action comedies, science and nature programs, family films, Mickey Mouse Club, numerous television series, theme parks, movie complexes, feature films, and marketing expertise.  Information is given about Mickey Mouse, Dumbo, Davy Crockett, Zorro, The Shaggy Dog, Winnie the Pooh.  Decades after his death, the Disney image is clean and wholesome entertainment.
    All facets of Disney's life and career are included and not all of it is flattering.  Disney, a perfectionist and not given to praise, was very demanding of his employees and was moody, grouchy, and insulting to those who displeased him.  Walt told employees that their work would have to be credited to him.  In order to spend time with him, Disney's wife had to go to the office in the middle of the night and sleep on the couch while he worked.  His brother, Roy, was eight years older than Walt and although they worked together in a business called Disney Brothers Studio, the name was changed to Walt Disney Studio.  Disney was also obsessed with death.
     Valuable additions to the book are a time line, chapter notes, for further reading, works consulted, and an index.  There are black and white photos on every other page as well as numerous sidebars to add interest.  This book will be read for reports and for pleasure.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Oleksy, Walter. CHRISTOPHER REEVE.  People in the News series.  San Diego:  Lucent, 2000.  112p.   
    0-56006-534-6; lib.bdg., $23.70   99-29830   Gr. 6-9+    791.43  

     Primary and secondary sources are part of this series and in this case, many interviews and articles as well as frequent references to Reeves' autobiography, STILL ME, appear in this book.  The full texts of Reeve's speeches at the Oscar Ceremonies and at the Democratic Convention, both after his accident, are included.   A divorce in Christopher's family caused him to seek approval from his natural father even though he related to his step-father.  Because his father was interested in politics and social causes, Christopher also became involved in several causes including defending creative freedom in Chile, defending the National Endowment for the arts, founding a research and rehabilitation centers, and lobbying Congress on behalf of medical benefits and funding for research.  A full account of all of Reeves acting includes live theater, a soap opera, the four Superman movies, the Cult movie, "Somewhere in Time,"  and other films.  Sixteen pages are devoted to the Superman movies.
    During his high school days, Reeve hid his insecurity through acting and played the part of the "All-American Boy."   Reeve was active in sports, a good student, and cooperative.  Because he went to an all male school, he even played a sixty-fie year old woman.  When he was in Cornell, he majored in English and music but took drama classes also. While at Juilliard, Reeve made friends with Robin Williams.  There are several ironies in his life: Reeve's stepfather did not allow his stepsons to read comic books and Reeves was allergic to horses.  Because of his mother's two unhappy marriages, Reeves had a fear of commitment and had two children in a relationship with a British woman but did not marry until he met an American to whom he is still married.  Brushes with death include experiences with planes, gliders, and horses.  The accident with the horse, his fifty-fifty operation, rehabilitation, and continuing activism are covered.  This book will appeal to a variety of audiences, those who do not want to read his longer autobiography, those who want to know more about Superman, activists for handicapped rights, and those who want to hear about his accident, injury, surgery, and road to recovery.  This is an versatile purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Steffes, Bradley and Robyn M. Weaver. CARTOONISTS. History Makers Series. San Diego:  Lucent, 2000.  
    112p.  1-56006-668-7; lib. bdg., $23.70   99-41317    Gr. 6-9     741.5

    The first chapter includes the history of cartooning from monks to Ben Franklin and Thomas Nast through how the name yellow journalism came to be.  Other chapters provide information about six cartoonists.   The chapter about Charles Schultz explains the inspiration for the little red haired girl and why he hated the name of the strip.  Although dates for the final strip is included, the book was printed before Schultz's death so that information is not included.  Chuck Jones, who created Road Runner and Henry Hawk and helped develop Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, was inspired by Walt Disney and later worked with Jim Henson to create "Sesame Street."  Learn why Gary Trudeau's strip, Doonesbury, appears on many editorial pages instead of on the comics page.  Trudeau's strip is controversial and even his Pulitzer Prize caused comments.  Cathy Gustwite has a Michigan connection.  Although born in Ohio, Cathy is a graduate of the University of Michigan and worked in advertising in Detroit and Southfield.   Like Charles Schultz, Cathy's strip is based on her own life–in this case as a single career woman.  Matt Groening's Simpsons were nominated for 30 Emmys and won six of them.  Scott Adams, creator of Dilbert, drew cartoons from an early age.  Dilbert satirizes big business like Trudeau satirizes politics.   Middle and high school libraries needing career information will be excited about this book.  Or purchase it because the topic is of interest to browsers.  Recommended for school, public, and university libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
 

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745.5 HANDICRAFTS

Braman, Arlette. KIDS AROUND THE WORLD CREATE!  THE BEST CRAFTS
    AND ACTIVITIES FROM  MANY LANDS.  Illus. by Jo-Ellen Bosson.  New York:
    Wiley, 1999.  0-471-29005-X; pb., $12.95.  128p.   Gr.3-7+    372.5  or  745.5

     Household items and simple ideas for making items to learn about customs and cultures around the world is the focus of Braman's book. The book is loosely arranged by topics, like "eye dazzlers" and "good luck always" which are not helpful.  However, the topics are laid out clearly for skimming on the contents pages and there is a good  index by geography or name of the culture but not by type of project.  Beads and baskets are listed but vase, book, and flag are not.  Included among the 24 projects are:  an Amish quilt; Guatemalan woven bookmark; Chinese Bamboo strip book; Inuit animal sculpture; Greek worry beads; Sudanese face painting;  and an Italian carnival mask.  A recipe for homemade (flour) dough is included.  The ideas are easy and safe enough for children so one wonders why it wasn't listed under the handicraft number.  This is a worthwhile book for elementary and middle schools and for public library collections.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Carter, David A. and James Diaz.  THE ELEMENTS OF POP-UP: A POP-UP
    BOOK FOR ASPIRING PAPER ENGINEERS.   New York: Little Simon/
    Simon and Schuster, 1999.  18p.  0-689-82224-3; hb., $35.00    745.54

    The introduction defines pop-ups and there is a glossary of 21 terms.  The book consists of 32 pop-ups and descriptions of them.  There are four wheels and 8 tabs for a total of 44 figures.  When each pop-up is opened, there are directions and letters on the sides to help readers understand and emulate them.  No art collection is complete without this book.  Children’s literature collections in universities and public libraries will also want this book.  Highly recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Drake, Jane and Ann Love.  THE KIDS WINTER HANDBOOK.  Illus by
    Heather Collins.  Tonawanda, NY:  Kids Can, 2001.  128p.  1-55337-033-3;
    hb., $18.95  1-55074-969-2; pb., $12.95 C2001-900531-8    Gr. K-4     790.1

    This book is "jammed-packed" with over a hundred interesting indoor and outdoor  projects about winter.  Some projects include weather recording and forecasting, star and animal track identification, kitting a scarf or making a fleece headband, tips for starting a campfire or a fire in a fireplace, snow games and art, bird feeding, making string or toothpick snowflakes, pinecone skier, indoor smores, hot chocolate and a gingerbread house.  The directions are clear and complete, the pencil sketches with green backgrounds add interest and information to the text and are helpful, and the projects are worthwhile.  This craft book also functions as a science book.  This book is recommended for school and public libraries everywhere but is essential in areas where snow is abundant.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Erlbach, Arlene.  MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYWHERE!  Brookfield, CT: Millbrook, 2002.
    48p.   0-7613-1956-5; lib.bdg., $23.90.  2001-044758    Gr.  1-5     394.26

    There are crafts from twenty countries, most of which are food or decorations.  Each entry includes the country identified on a map; a phonetic pronunciation of the greeting; and a brief summary of how the holiday is celebrated, including gift giving; a  list of ingredients and directions with illustrations.  The projects are related to the countries.  However, neither the introduction nor the individual articles mention that in some of the countries the Christian population is very small; for example, in Japan less than 1% of the population.  According to the Oslo Coalition on Freedom of Religion or Belief at the Human Rights Internet, the following countries were not predominately Christian in 2000.  India (80% Hindu, 14% Muslim, 2.4% Christian); Ethiopia (45% Sunni Muslims, 40% Ethiopian Orthodox); Nigeria (50% Muslim, 40% Christian); Ghana (35% Christian, 31% Indigenous, 27% Muslims); Lebanon (70% Muslim, 30% Christian); and Japan (49.2% Buddhist, 44.7% Shinto, and 0.8% Christian).  Information shared in the introduction tells that some countries celebrate on Jan. 6 rather than Dec. 25 but no mention is made that only a fraction of the people in some the countries celebrate this holiday at all which is misleading to readers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Hendry, Linda.  CAT CRAFTS.  Kids Can Do It.  Illus. by Linda Hendry.
    Tonawanda, NY:  Kids Can, 2002.  40p.  1-5507074-964-1; lib. bdg., $12.95
    1-55074-921-8; pb., $5.95   C2001-900827-9   Gr. 3-7   745.5

    The directions for the 17 craft projects are clear enough for children to follow by themselves.  Readers are warned that if they use a utility knife, they should ask an adult for help.  They are also warned not to let small pieces around to harm their pet.  Materials are easily found and a list of ingredients for each project appears in a sidebar   Because the book is Canadian, the sizes are given in metric and imperial.  There is a companion craft book about dogs and some of the projects overlap but the patterns are different. Projects in both the cat and dog books include, an album, organizer, jewelry, bookend, placemat, and lampshade.  The directions are similar and sometimes word for word in both books.  Many of the projects could be changed to reflect diverse interests such as frogs or  pigs.  Some projects specific to cats are the spider toy, scratch pad, catnip fish, and catnip container.  Purchase both books to satisfy both cat and dog lovers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Hendry, Linda.  DOG CRAFTS.  Kids Can Do It.  Illus.by Linda Hendry. Tonawanda, NY:  Kids Can,  2002.  
    40p. 1-5507074-960-9 lib. bdg. $12.95   1-55074-962-5 pb. $5.95    C2001-901700-6      Gr. 3-7     745.5

    The directions for the 17 craft projects are clear enough for children to follow themselves.  Readers are warned that if they use a utility knife, they should ask an adult for help.  Materials are easily found and a list of ingredients for each project appears in a sidebar   Because the book is Canadian, the sizes are given in metric and imperial.  There is a companion craft book about cats and some of the projects overlap but the patterns are different.  Projects in the both the cat and dog books include, an album, organizer, jewelry, bookends, placemat, and lampshade.  The directions are similar and sometimes word for word in both books.  Many of the projects could be changed to reflect diverse interests such as frogs or  pigs.  Some projects specific to dogs are the treat jar, puppy pillow, collar, grooming caddy, and canine clipboard.  The dog biscuit frame is clever and easy to make.  Purchase both books to satisfy both cat and dog lovers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Kennedy, Marge.  DISNEY'S CHRISTMAS CRAFTS FOR KIDS.
    New York:  Disney/Roundtable, 1998.  80p.    0-7868-3196-0 hb.,
    $18.95    0-7868-4331-4 pb., $9.95     98-84799    Gr. 5+     793.2

    This title is a must-have for anyone who enjoys creating original gifts.  Packed full of projects (75+) this gem contains gifts simplistic enough for preschoolers, yet imaginative and elegant enough to be made by grown-ups.  Step-by-step instructions talk the reader through the  project in large bold print.  Each project begins with an intriguing chapter title such as "Alice's Perky Painted Pots," or "Piglet's Christmas Countdown Calendar" as well as a list of necessary materials. These universal projects are not Disney-promotional.  The only thing "Disney" about the book are the titles issued  to each creation. This would be a great tool for teachers, parents or scout leaders.
    Charlotte Oshee, Children's Assistant, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Manning, Mick and Brita Granstrom.  DINOMANIA.  New York: Holiday, 2002.
    48p.   0-8234-1641-0; hb., $16.95.  2001-024534    Gr. 1-5    745.5

    There are lots of books about dinosaurs, but this book has a different twist.  After a brief introduction about dinosaurs the book is devoted to projects kids can make about those fascinating creatures.  Most of the 18 projects cover a double spread. A list of ingredients appears in a sidebar.  Step by step directions appear for each.  A “sound-bite” in the shape of a dinosaur bite, provides tidbits of information about dinosaurs.  Some of the projects are making a time line, a nesting colony, a Peterosaur mobile, costumes for several dinosaurs, making a video, or performing a play.
    The “Dinosaur ID” pictures 13 dinosaurs and gives the period in which they lived, whether they were meat or plant eaters, and how big they were.  An index concludes the book.  Different dinosaur patterns appear on both end papers so the dust jacket should be removed so it doesn’t cover up any of the dinosaurs.  This books should prove popular in school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Milord, Susan.  HANDS AROUND THE WORLD: 365 WAYS TO BUILD CULTURAL
    AWARENESS AND  GLOBAL RESPECT.  Williamson Kids Can! Series.  Milwaukee:
    Gareth Stevens, 1999. 160p.  0-8368-2231-5  lib.bdg. $25.93     98-01304    Gr. 5+    306

    The author begins with information about the materials and tools used and cautions readers to ask for adult help when using knives, saws, X-acto knives, and hot items as well as some other cautions.  There is a reminder to abide by the cautions mentioned in the projects themselves.  This is good advice because some of the projects involve lanterns, tapers, and fire.  Perhaps this book belongs in the adult collection for adults to prepare projects for children rather than have it on the shelves for the children to use by themselves.   A  Chinese calender, the oldest continuously used calendar in the world is provided even before the projects which are numbered for days of the year within each month.  A glossary, bibliographies for books and videos, places to visit, and web sites are given.  Neither the list of books or videos have copyright dates.
    Some of the ideas are just suggestions of things to do that have a tenuous relationship to the month.  General ideas like comparing greetings around the world, visiting a zoo, caring for a pet, looking at different alphabets, or designing a family crest, while interesting, appear to be ideas to fill up the days of each month.  Some of the projects are interesting craft ideas that can be worked into public library projects throughout the year:  poppers, 3-1; springing frog, 3-23; tangram, 4-21; rebus, 5-25; Morse code messages, 5-26; shadow puppets, 7-27; friendship bracelet, 8-14; folding book, 8-7; string story, 10-8; folded box, 10-27; and mask, 10-30.
    The index is good for locating cultures but not one of the  projects mentioned in this paragraph is listed in the index by project type. Many of the projects can be used by teachers, librarians, and adult leaders for cultural art projects.  A  January 3rd  activity is making Belgian New Year's cookies.  Some February activities are:  decorating sticks for Bolladagur (Islandic pre-Leton holiday),8; making a dragon streamer for Chun jie (Chinese spring festival), 18; and making cascarones for Carnival (day before Lent), 27.  March activities include making: a wishing darma dolll (Japanese folk toy),18; an Easter egg tree (Europe), 28; and Belarus straw designs, 26.  May activities include:  folding paper airplanes, 7; baking Cuban yeast bread , 9; and eating flowers, 20.  Activities for June include planting a tree for World Environment Day, 5; baking a German spice cake, 8; listening to other national anthems, 17; and making a Huichol, "God's Eye," 28;    Activities for July include making a Tanabata decoration (Japan), 7; baking Turkish crescent cookies, 9; saying something in Esperanto, 30; or signing language, 31.   Ideas for August include a recipe for making Salsa Cruda (Spanish), 8 and making a Schultute for the first day of school in Germany, 28.   Ideas for September include:  adding with an abacus, 5; helping someone read on International Literacy Day, 8; and making a morris board (Egyptian game), 16.   October activities include reading from a holy book or learning about Lait al-Qadr or "Night of Power" from Islam, 5.  November projects include creating an Ikebana (Japanese flower arrangement), 13, or constructing a Christian advent calendar, 30.  December includes making a Hanukkah dreidel, (Jewish top), 9; decorating for Las Posadas, (Mexico), 17; and sharing Kwanza memories (African American); 26.
    The main benefit of this book is the multicultural projects and libraries needing such  projects will be able to find enough projects to make this a worthwhile purchase.  Many libraries already have the 1995 book.  If so, that one will suffice.   However, a companion book, THE KIDS' MULTICULTURAL ART BOOK: ART CRAFT EXPERIENCES FROM AROUND THE WORLD offers patterns and more detailed directions.  Check 745.5  for this companion book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Pawson, Des.  THE HANDBOOK OF KNOTS: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO TYING
    AND USING MORE THAN 100 KNOTS.    Illus. with photos.  New York: DK, 1998.
    160p.    0-7894-2395-2 pb., $16.95.    97-38707    Gr. 4-12+      623.88

    Using different colors of line to clearly show the exact way to tie the knots, the photos and the short, but clear directions make the book very useful.   The book is well laid out and the format is inviting for anyone interested in knot typing, even "eager" beginners and intermediates.  The author explaines which knot to use for specific tasks.   This book is of interest to sailors, boaters, hikers, rock and mountain climbers, scouts, etc.   It could also be used as a text for Coast Guard auxiliary safe boating classes or for teaching survival skills making it especially valuable to libraries near lakes and wilderness areas.  Even the size of the book is a plus, making it portable.  Highly recommended.
    Penny Pederson, teacher and librarian, Graveraet Middle School, Marquette, MI

Ross, Kathy. ALL NEW CRAFTS FOR HALLOWEEN.  Illus. by Sharon Lane Holm. 
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook Press, Inc., 2003.  48 pg.  0-7613-2554-9 lib.bdg.
    0-7613-1577-2 pb $7.95    Gr. 2-6    J745.594

    This hands-on book of projects is fun for young and old.  It gives a list of supplies and step-by-step directions for each project.  The supplies are inexpensive, and all projects can be completed in 10 steps or less.  All New Crafts for Halloween will find a place on library shelves next to Kathy Ross’ numerous craft books for every holiday.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Ross, Kathy.  ALL NEW CRAFTS FOR VALENTINE’S DAY.  Illus by Barbara Leonard.
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  48p.  0-7613-2553-04 lib.bdg., $23.9   2002-001930
    Gr. 2-5    745.594

    Some of the twenty craft items are bookmarks, magnets, bracelets, chimes, games, jewelry, baskets, garlands, and wreaths.  There is a list of needed supplies and step-by- step instructions.  Although the crafts are excellent for February because many incorporate hearts into the design, projects like the message pad cover could be adapted for other times of the year.  Teachers, librarians, and adult club leaders will find plenty of projects for kids to take home to relatives.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ross, Kathy.  CRAFTS FROM YOUR FAVORITE NURSERY RHYMES.
    Illus by Elaine Garvin.  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  48p.  0-7613-2523-9
    lib.bdg. $24.40    0-7613-1589-6 pb. $8.95    2001-044665    Gr. 2-5    745.5

    The twenty-one projects include puppets, magnets, costume, crown, soap dispenser, pin, bouquet, and more.  There are written as well as pictorial instructions and a list of what is needed for the projects,  many of which are usual craft supplies.  The projects are not complicated but the total projects are above the level of preschool story hour children who would be interested in the nursery rhymes.  If used with preschoolers,  volunteers may wish to complete most of the project and leave part for the children to finish.  Use with one-on-one supervision with primary children.  Librarians may wish to make the craft to use when introducing nursery rhymes.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Ross, Kathy.  CRAFTS THAT CELEBRATE BLACK HISTORY.   Illus by
    Jeremy Stow.  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  48p.  0-7613-2515-8; lib.bdg.,
    $23.90    0-7613-1589-6; pb., $7.95     2001-044769      Gr. 2-6    745.594

    Use this book all year round instead of just during Black history month in February.  There is a brief biography with birth and death year for 19 African Americans to provide instant prior knowledge for children before they create the projects.  None of the people are living and they are arranged loosely in chronological order.  Five of them are women: Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells, Mary McLeod Bethune, and Marian Anderson.  The males represent various occupations:  Jesse Owens, athlete; Paul Laurence Dunbar, poet; Matthew A. Henson, Arctic explorer; and Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights leader.  A magnet made from a peanut is the project that aptly represents George Washington Carver.  Some of the other projects are varied: flip game, puzzle, pin, maze, bookmark, and puppets.   School and public libraries should purchase this craft book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Ross, Kathy, CRAFTS TO MAKE IN THE WINTER.  Illus. by Vicky Enright.
     Brookfield,  CT:  Millbrook, 1999. 64p.   0-7613-0319-7. $16.95.   Gr. 3+    745.5

     A wide range and diversity of activities will make this book a welcomed addition to the craft section and will be grabbed by anyone ages 8-12.  Brownie leaders, teachers or  moms will devour the contents.  Ross presents instructions and drawings for twenty-nine craft projects with a winter or holiday theme including puppets, Christmas ornaments, magnets, masks,  Valentines and much more.  The instructions are concise and easy to follow which will make it sought after on a cold, blustery, stay-in-the-house wintry day.
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Ross, Kathy.  LETTER SHAPES.  Illus by Jan Barger.  Learning is Fun! series.
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  64p.  0-7613-2103-9; lib.bdg., $24.40
    0-7613-1490-3; pb., $8.95   2001-1030132  Gr.  3+   745.5

    Ross, no novice at creating craft projects, has prepared crafts for each capital letter in the alphabet.  She gives directions for making letters from the book, on the computer and copy machine, or die-cut machines.  Each letter, through folding, cutting, and pasting with a paper fastener and a pom pom here and there, can be made into an art project.  Those who know children’s literature already have books in mind to use with making two B’s into a butterfly, eight circles of C into a caterpillar, and a paper plate and two letter D’s into a duck mask.   Persons working in preschools, primary schools, or preschool story hours in public libraries will love this book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Ross, Kathy.  LETTER SOUNDS.  Illus by Jan Barger.  Learning is Fun! series.
    Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  64p.  0-7613-2102-0; lib.bdg., $24.40
    0-7613-1491-1 pb., $8.95    2001-1030120    Gr.  3+   745.5

    Upper and lower case letters are shown for each letter of the alphabet.  Then  two or three words beginning with the letter are given; i.e., Activity on an Anthill, Bubble-Blowing Boy, Creepy, Crawly Caterpillar X-rat Vest, Yawning Yellow-haired Puppet, and Zipper-Bag Zoo Book.  A written and pictorial list of the items needed are provided and directions are listed in numerical order in a section called “Here is what you do.”  At the end of the book, directions are given for making beaded letters, Rainbow Letter Pages, and a Magnetic Dots Letter Box.  This is another winner for adults who work in preschools, primary schools, or conduct pre-school story hours at public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Ross, Kathy.  TRIANGLES, RECTANGLES, CIRCLES, AND SQUARES.
    Illus. by Jan Barger.  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  48p.  0-7613-2104-7;
    lib.bdg., $23.90    2001-044769      Gr. 2-6    745.594

    The twenty craft ideas help children learn about basic shapes: circles, squares, triangles, and rectangles.  Project ideas are puppets, flowers, games, birds, handbells, page markers, lapel pins, and jewelry.  Only the imagination of the leader limits these projects for all types of pre-school programs.  Primary teachers can adapt the projects for their students as well.  All projects are easy and the shape snakes are especially easy for children to make in library story hour programs.  The circle snake could also be a caterpillar for Carle’s THE HUNGRY CATERPILLAR(Penguin, 1979).     Use projects with shape books like Emberley’s WING ON A FLEA (Little, 01); Schuette’s CIRCLES and TRIANGLES and Tucker’s LOOKING AT SHAPES , all published by Pebble/Capstone 2002); Kai-Dotlich’s WHAT IS ROUND? (Harper, 1999); Hoban’s TOO MANY CIRCLES, SO MANY SQUARES (GW/Harper, 1998); and SHAPES, SHAPES, SHAPES (Morrow, 1996); and Ross’ SQUARES (Kid’s Can, 1997).
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Sadler, Judy Ann.  KNITTING.  Illus by Esperanca Melo.  (Kids Can Do It series)
    Tonawanda,  NY:  Kids Can, 2002.  40p.  1-55337-050-3;  lib.bdg., $12.95
    1-55337-051-1 pb., $5.95    C2001-903316-8     Age 8+     746.43

    Clear, precise drawings show readers how to “cast on, knit and purl, increase and decrease, and cast off.  The rest of the book shows stitches for thirteen projects including scarves, a headband, a book bag, and a blanket.  A glossary of a dozen knitting abbreviations concludes the book.  Knitters appreciated the list of what was needed for each project as well as the “Yarn tips and tails” for beginners.  Knitters said this book could be used by anyone who wants to learn to knit.  The directions are for right-handed people but reversing  the directions for left handed persons can help “lefties.”
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Silver, Patricia.  FACE PAINTING.  Illus with photos.  Niagra Falls, NY:  Kids Can Press,
    2000.  40p.  1-55074-845-9; hb., $12.95.   Kids Can Do It series.
    1-55074-689-8; pb., $5.95    C99-933034-9    Gr. 2-7+    745.5

    After giving basic face-painting tips including materials needed, the author provides directions for making three clowns; five animals; four Halloween characters;  four special characters (a princess, pirate, alien, and fairy); and some easy designs.  There are ideas for utilizing the faces for fun filled activities like telling jokes to fit the character and entertaining at local fund raisers.  The format for each face is a single or double page spread that includes a photo of the finished face, a list of supplies needed, a list of easy costume pieces, and from 4 to 9 drawings with instructions for a step-by-step creation of the face.   This book will be used year round but be sure to place it with your Halloween book displays.  Don't miss this one.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Terzian, Alexandra M..  THE KIDS' MULTICULTURAL ART BOOK:   ART &
    CRAFT EXPERIENCES FROM  AROUND THE WORLD.
 Williamson Kids Can!
    Series. Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 1999.   160p.  0-8368-2233-1; lib.bdg., $23.93  
    98-03352        Gr. 7+       745.5

     This book of multicultural craft projects is an important addition to any school or public library collection.  Children's librarians will find the masks and puppet projects as well as the papier-mache' and salt dough recipes helpful.  Classroom teachers can easily integrate the projects into various studies.  Leaders of scout and other groups can also utilize the projects.  The projects are easy enough for kids to complete themselves but unfortunately many will not look for projects on their own unless they are given an assignment.    Originally published in 1993, this book is divided into four sections: Native Americans of North America; Hispanics of Mexico and Central America; Africans; and Asians of India, the Far East, and the Southeast.  Under each of the four headings, there are further subdivisions so that 17 areas  and 51 projects are covered.  There are a dozen projects for native peoples of the Americas including a Chippewa dream catcher and a Northwest totem pole.  Spanish teachers will be interested in 14 projects including Huichol yarn art and Guatemalan plate designs.  A papier-mache' calabash, Egyptian paper beads, and Kente paper weaving are three out of 11 African projects.  A Korean dragon puppet, Thai hanging owl, and Vietnamese dragon are three of the 12 Asian examples.  There is a glossary, bibliographies of books, videos, places to visit, and web sites.  The book is entirely executed in black and white which makes the patterns easy to duplicate.  The directions are clear and there is a list of materials.  Maps of the four areas of the world and cultural clues add to understanding.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Warwick, Ellen.  STUFF FOR YOUR SPACE.  Illus. by Bernice Lum.  Tonawanda, NY:
    Kids Can Press, 2004.  40p.  1-555337-398-7 hb.  $12.95   Gr. 3+   j745.593

    You can make a Stellar Area Rug,  a Baseball Clock, or ten other accessories for your room with these easy-to-follow instructions from Warwick's illustrated book.  Young teens will appreciate the step-by-step presentation of each project.   Parents will approve of the short list of materials and tools needed for the projects.  Any library will welcome this book to their collection.
    Lynette Suckow, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

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750 PAINTING & PAINTERS

Blake, Quentin.  TELL ME A PICTURE.  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  110p.
    0-7613-2748-7; lib.bdg., $29.90   0-7613-1893-3; pb.   2002-013827    Gr. 4-12+     750.1

    This book was originally an exhibition of pictures selected by Quentin Blake from the National Gallery in London.  The paintings are arranged in alphabetical order by the artist; each painting is opposite a blank page so viewers can look at the paintings without outside interference.   On the next double-page spread there is a close-up of the painting, line drawings by Blake of children and how the painting makes them feel or questions the painting evokes.  There is also an announcement about the next artist.
    At the end of the book there is a miniature picture with information about the painting, artist, dates, title of painting, painting date, and painting measurement.  There is also a list of locations for the paintings.  Blake also gives ideas for visiting art museums with children.
    Some of the artists are familiar to picture book readers--John Burningham, Michael Foreman, Roberto Innocenti, Gabrielle Vincent, and Lisbeth Zwerger.  Others are by notaries--Goya, de Saint-Aubin, and Uccello--while some are not so well known.  All are interesting.  This book will be enjoyed by art students from children to adults.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Greeenberg, Jan and Sandra Jordan.  ACTION JACKSON.  Illus by Robert Andrew Parker,
    Brookfield, CT:  Roaring Brook/Millbrook, 2002.  32p. 0-7613-2770-3;     hb., $23.90
    Gr.  2-5     759.13  

    This picture book for older students is devoted to the morning when Pollock created the canvas that was known as “Number 1, 1950” or “Lavender Mist.”  The author, who knew Pollock when he was young, shows this controversial artist using his body to create this famous painting.  There is a two-page biography of Pollock from 1912-1956 with several photos, two pages of notes and sources with photos of paintings, biography notes, and a bibliography.  This unusual book will be good for art history collections at all levels.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Lacey, Sue. LANDSCAPES, UNDERSTANDING ART WITH LOTS OF
    PRACTICAL STEP-BY-STEP PROJECTS FOR THE YOUNG ARTIST .
    Start with Art series.  Brookfield, CT:  Copper Beech, 2000. 32p.
    0-7613-0843-1 pb., $6.95   0-7613-1167-X lib.bdg., $22.90   Gr. 3-9+    704.9

    A picture by a master, accompanied by title and dates of the artists, is surrounded with comments about the picture.  A paragraph about the artists' life appears on that page.  The opposite page shows readers how they can create a picture with a medium similar to that of the master.  Each of the dozen artists' works represents a technique that is the heading for those two pages.  The artists are: Monet, light; Ceznne, composition and color; Van Gogh, movement/color; Seurat, Gauguin, colors/shapes;  Constable, weather and skies;  Turner, seascapes; Kandinsky, shapes; Renoir, light/color; Dali, surrealism; Hokusai, wood block printing; and Morisot, charcoal sketching.  A glossary and index conclude the book.  This book provides an easy way to understand the medium used by art masters as well as introduces famous paintings to children as well as adults.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Oliver, Clare.  1960-80: EXPERIMENTS AND NEW DIRECTIONS; FROM
    OP AND POP ART TO SUPER-REALISM, MINIMALISM, AND
    CONCEPTUAL ART.  20th Century Art series.  Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 2001.
    32p.   0-8368-2851-8; lib.bdg., $22.60   Gr. 3-9+   709.04

    This series, first published in Great Britain in 2000, provides a quick and lively overview of  one or more decades.  The locations of the paintings or sculptures are provided at the beginning of the book while information about the art movement or artist with a brief biography is included.  The book concludes with a time line of the decade, glossary, book and web site bibliographies, and an index.  The illustrations, photos, paintings, sculptures, and text are placed in artistic patterns on each double-page spread although the first item in each begins with a description of the movement or a brief biography of the featured artist.
    Topics include: Revolutions in Art during the 60s and 70s; Move it with Russian Constructivists and Calder; Op Art with Anuszkiewicz and Vasarely; American Pop Art with Warhol; British Pop with Clark and Hockney; Art as Idea with Barthes and Kosuth; Invisible Art with Manoni; Art's Happening with Gilbert and George; Land Art with Christo and Jeanne-Claude; Less is More/Minimalist Art with Andre; Really Real with Hanson and Close; Australian Art with Tjapaltjarri; Latin American Art with Marguerita.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Oliver, Clare.  1980-2000:  NEW MEDIA, NEW MESSAGES; FROM
    NEO-EXPRESSIONISM AND GRAFFITI ART TO KITSCH, VIDEO,
    AND DIGITAL ART.  20th Century Art series.  Milwaukee:  Gareth Stevens, 2001.
    32p.  0-8368-2853-4; lib.bdg., $22.60   Gr. 3-9+    709.04

    This series, first published in Great Britain in 2000, provides a quick and lively overview of one or more decades.  The locations of the paintings or sculptures are provided at the beginning of the book while information about the art movement or artist with a brief biography is included.  The book concludes with a time line of the decade, glossary, book and web site bibliographies, and an index.  The illustrations, photos, paintings, sculptures, and text are placed in artistic patterns on each double-page spread although the first item in each begins with a description of the movement or a brief biography of the featured artist.
    Some concepts include: Using Words in Art with Sean Landers; Utilizing Negative Space with Anish Kapoor; Abstract Colors with Patric Heron or Gerhard Richter; Art and Emotion with Anselm Kiefer or Neo-Expressionists; Bad Painting with Juliain Schnabel; Graffiti Art with Jean-Michel Basquiat and others; Large Sculptures with Louise Bourgeois; Bold Materials with Damien Hirst; Kitch Culture with Jeff Koones; Art and Photography with Andreas Gursky; Video Art with Nam June Paik; and Computer-age Art with Jake Tilson.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Raczka, Bob.  NO ONE SAW:  ORDINARY THINGS THROUGH THE EYES OF AN ARTIST.  
    Brookfiekd, CT:  Millbrook, 2002.  32p.  0-7613-2370-8; lib.bdg., $22.90   0-7613-1648-5; hb., $17.95
    2001-1030006     Gr. 3-8+     759.06

    This beautiful book begins with a double page spread of a flower accompanied by the following text:  "No one saw flowers like Georgia O'Keeffe."  The following pages use the same pattern to show apples by Cezanne, soup by Warhol, mothers by Cassatt, dancers by Degas and introduce the styles of Cezanne, Chagall, Kandinsky, Klee, Magritte, Mior', Mondriain, Monet, Renoir, Seurat, Van Gogh, and Wood.  A list of the 16 paintings appears at the end of the book with the title of the work, the date, and the artist.  The note about each artist shows a small picture, the artist's name with phonetic spelling, birth and death dates, and a four or five line brief biography.  The photo credits provide the art medium (most are oil on canvas) and location of the paintings.  Use this book with pages of Paulin's CREATIVE USES OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (Library Professional Publications, 1982)
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
 
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752 COLOR

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760 GRAPHIC ARTS; PRINTMAKING

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770 PHOTOGRAPHY


Sills, Leslie.  IN REAL LIFE:  SIX WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS.  New York: Holiday, 2000.
    80p.  ISBN 0-823444-1498-1 hb. $19.95.    Gr. 6-12    NF 700.92

    Sills tells readers about types of photos in the introduction, but not why she chose the six women photographers.  For instance, Sills talks about photos being everywhere including newspapers and magazines, but does not include journalist, Margaret Bourke White.  Some on the list use the camera as an activist which others use it to record countries in turmoil.  The artists featured are:  Imogen Cuningham, Dorothea Lang, Lola Alvarez Bravo, Carrie Mae Weems, Elsa Dorfman, and Cindy Sherman.  Quibbles over inclusion of the photographers aside, the six women are worthy of inclusion.  Besides a general bibliography, there are extensive bibliographies for each woman.  URLs for websites about four of the women are included.  A complete indes is also helpful.  This book is valuable for women's studies, career education, or arts collections.  Recommended where this title meets the needs of the library.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Sullivan, George.  PICTURING LINCOLN: FAMOUS PHOTOGRAPHS THAT
    POPULARIZED THE PRESIDENT.  New York:  Clarion, 2000.  88p.
    0-395-91682-8 hb. $16.00    Gr. 4-9    973.7

    Sullivan takes a different approach to this popular president; he shares Lincoln through his photos and portraits.  Photography had just been invented when Lincoln had his first portrait in 1846 with a daguerreotype.  In order to reproduce likenesses, engravers made wood blocks or stone lithographs based on the photos and used them for newspapers, magazines, fliers, postcards, posters, medals, and campaign buttons.  Many engravings were based on Hesler’s photo of Lincoln with the uncombed hair, which became known as the “Wigwam print.”  Many of the other photos had names like the “Cooper Union likeness” that was distributed for the campaign of 1860.  Family portraits weer included as well as mementos after Lincoln’s death.
    People interested in postage stamps and coins will also be interested in this book that contains information about Lincoln’s likenesses for those mediums.  The first Lincoln penny was produced in 1909 and pictures of both sides are shown.  A large 2000 Lincoln penny appears on the back cover of the book.  Information about the five-dollar bill portrait is included--both the old one and the new one introduced in 2000.   There are chapter notes, a list of a dozen books, and an index that uses italic numbers to refer to illustrations or captions.   The writing is smooth, the illustrations are clear, and the book can be read all the way through or just selected areas of interest.  This book has many uses; it is a good book for Presidents’ Day, history, elections, biography, stamps, and coins.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, director, Superiorland Preview Center
 

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780 SONGS  

Berlin, Irving. EASTER PARADE.  Illus by Lisa McCue.  New York: HarperCollins,
    1933, 1960, 2003.  32p.  0-06-029125-7; hb., $15.99  0-06-029126-5; lib.bdg.,
    $16.89   2001-024967    PreS-Gr. 3     E   or   782

    Music and lyrics for the familiar secular Easter song appear at the end of this picture book.  A father rabbit takes his little girl to the Easter parade.  The child oriented illustrations tell a parallel story about the parade and how the girl rabbit loses her hat to the wind and how her father retrieves it.  When adults read the text, it is impossible for them to keep from singing the lyrics.  When non-readers look at the pictures, they can see a story of their own.  The text and illustrations also work in concert.  The end papers show the village where all the animals live and adults will appreciate the play on the names of various establishments.  This is definitely a gift book to grace an Easter basket but it is also suitable for day care centers or school and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Cabrera, Jane.  OVER IN THE MEADOW.  Illus. by author.  New York: Holiday,
    1999.  32p.   0-8234-1490-6; hb., $16.95      99-22683    PreS-Gr. 2    E

     The large colorful illustrations in this traditional counting song will hold the interest of children.  The song begins with one turtle and ends with ten rabbits, all of which are shown in a double page spread at the end of the book which make great patterns for flannel board  or transparency characters.  Although no music is provided in this picture book, it can be sung instead of read to children.  The pictures are large enough to be seen by a group.  The duck is similar to the one found in Cabrera's EGGSDAY (Holiday, 1999).  This book is suitable for home, preschool, daycare, and primary school libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Carter, David. A.  IF YOU'RE HAPPY AND YOU KNOW IT, CLAP YOUR
    HANDS!  A POP-UP BOOK.  New York:  Scholastic/Cartwheel, 1997.  14p.
    0-590-93828-2; hb., $14.95.     PreS-Gr. 1     E   or   780

    Music and lyrics appear on the back cover of this book which is a charming rendition of a favorite nursery song.  Children can't help but join in singing the story while pulling tabs to see the animals act out the song.  The second time around, children may wish to participate by providing their own actions aided by directions in bold print.  The tabs are sturdy enough for public library circulation.  Or the book might be saved for preschool story hours when librarians might ask individual children to pull the tabs. Children will enjoy the pop-up at the end of the book.  The animals in the book are colorful and enchanting, especially when in action.  This is an excellent book for personal, school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Carter, David. A.  OLD MAC DONALD HAD A FARM, E-I-E-I-O!
    A POP-UP BOOK.  New York:  Scholastic/Cartwhee, 1997.  14p.
    0-439-26468-5; hb., $14.95.     PreS-Gr.1    E   or   780

    Farmer MacDonald is portrayed as a cat wearing jeans overalls, a straw hat, and with a pitchfork in his hand.  All that is missing for the usual hayseed stereotype of a farmer is the stalk of hay missing from between his teeth.  Children can participate in this book by singing the bold print refrain, E-I-E-I-O and by opening doors, gates, and even looking behind cattails in a pond.  As each aperture is opened, readers can read the name of the animal and the cumulative words to the song.  The music and lyrics appear on the back of the book.  This is an interactive book in which children will enjoy participating by singing or opening.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
    32 years of experience as a school library-media specialist

 Collins, Heather. ROCK-A-BYE BABY.  Illus by H. Collins.  Niagara Fallls, NY: Kids Can,
    2000.  12p.  1-55074-572-7;  bd.bk.; $3.95.   C99-932022-X     PreS     398.8   or    BB

     Sized for little hands, the four books in this series are just right for the youngest child.  The total rhyme of four lines is included in this board book.  The characters are stuffed animals which will appeal to small children.  The last scene, when baby falls, is not scary because all the other animals are there to catch the rabbit.  This series provides good choices for preschool and public library boardbook collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library media specialist

Collins, Heather. ROW, ROW, ROW YOUR BOAT.  Illus by H. Collins.
    Niagara Fallls, NY: Kids Can, 2000.  12p.    1-55074-570-0; bd.bk; $3.95.
    C99-932019-X      PreS      398.8       or   780           BB

     The chorus of this favorite nursery song is the text of this board book which is sized to the youngest  child.  The characters are stuffed animals and even the moon looks friendly.   A stuffed bear climbs into a cottage bedroom and takes the animals to a rowboat.  For the "gently down the stream" sequence.  The rowboat takes off into the sky for the "Life is but a dream" sequence.  The book is a "warm fuzzy" and deserves a place in board book collections at home, at preschools, and at public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Collins, Heather.  TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR.  Illus.  by H. Collins.
    Niagara Falls, NY:  Kids Can, 2000.  12p.  1-55074-566-2; bd.bk.; $3.95.
    C99-932020-3      PreS      398.8    or   780       BB

     The stuffed animals admire the star in the sky at the beginning of this board book and as the favorite nursery song ends, the animals examine the star at close quarters.  There is no music but it is impossible to read this book aloud without giving in to the temptation to sing the familiar song.  Add this to board book home, preschool, and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Dylan, Bob.  MAN GAVE NAMES TO ALL THE ANIMALS.
    Illus. by Scott Menchin.  San Diego:  Harcourt,1979, 1999.  unp.
    0-15-22005-5; hb.,$16.00   98-28826    K-6+    782.42    or      E

     Although no music is included, the title of the album which includes this song is given, SLOW TRAIN COMING.  Menchin treats this song like a riddle poem.  He provides two pages of  pictures to go with the first part up to the rhyme that gives a clue to the identify of the animal and then he includes a full picture of the animal with the refrain, "Ah, think I'll call it a ...."  The nature of Menchin's illustrations makes this a song that can be used at many grade levels, even past middle school.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director,  Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Frazee, Marla., illus.   HUSH, LITTLE BABY: A FOLK SONG.   San Diego:
     Browndeer/Harcourt, 1999. unp.   0-15-201429-2; hb., $15.00    98-09608
     PreS-Gr. 3       782.42    or      E

     Frazee uses acrylic ink and black pencil to illustrate this familiar folk lullaby, depicted in a colonial setting.  The illustrations  present a story all their own.  The baby has an older sister in bare feet in their cabin.   From  his horse and wagon, a peddler supplies the mockingbird in a cage, ring, looking glass, billy goat and cart, and other items from the song.  No matter what the parents and sister give the baby, he/she yells his/her head off until the horse and cart fall down in a heap.  The pictures are humorous and carry the lyrics and more.  Music and lyrics for four verses appear at the end of the book.  Recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

GOD BLESS AMERICA.  Illus by Lunn Munsinger.  Music by I. Berlin. New York:
    HarperCollins, 1938, 1966, 2002.  32p.  CD performed by Barbara Streisand. Sony
    Music, 2001.  0-06-009788-4; hb., $15.99  0-06-009789-2; lib.bdg., $15.89
    2002-002154    PreS-Gr. 3    782.421

    Munsinger’s watercolor illustrations of a father bear and his family visiting the places in Berlin’s familiar song make it accessible to small children.  The bear family begins by raising the flag on their home pole and their car arial.  They watch a parade for “Stand beside her” and see military men, policemen, a fireman, and man in a hard hat-- bears of course.  “Through the night with a light from above” shows the family looking at the new New York skyline from what is probably the Staten Island ferry.  They are camping in the woods for “From the mountains” and on an old fashioned farm for “To the prairies.”   The family peeks out of the halo of the Statue of Liberty for “God bless America” and are safely back home for “My home sweet home” where they hug their mother.  The illustrations are very appealing and age appropriate.  Music and lyrics for two verses appear in a double page spread at the end of the book.  The book is accompanied by a CD.   Barbara Streisand’s rendition of this classic is stylized and fits the illustrations better than a military band would.
    An endnote indicates that royalties for the song, published in 1938, were given to the God Bless America Fund whose money goes to the Scout councils of greater New York.  Today, part of that funding goes to children affected by the events of September 11.  A portion of the publisher’s proceeds is also being donated to the fund.  Since 911, a plethora of patriotic books have been published for children but this one is superior to most.  This is a first purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Hammerstein II, Oscar.  GETTING TO KNOW YOU!  Music by Richard Rodgers.
    Illustrations by Rosemary Wells.  New York:  Harper, 2002.  64p.
    0-06-027925-7; hb., $19.99  0-06-623845-5; lib.bdg., $19.89     2001-016847
    Paperback songbook included.   Gr.  4-12+      782.1

    Some of the selections from the 15 songs of Rogers and Hammerstein were selected because of their appeal to children like “I Whistle a Happy Tune,” “Happy Talk,”  and “Dites-Moi.”  Some are less appropriate:  “I’m Gonna Wash that Man Right Outa My Hair,” “Oklahoma,” “When the Children Are Asleep,” “Bali Ha’I,” and “Some Enchanted Evening.”   However, the lyrics are no more obscure to children than the nonsense of nursery rhymes.  The redeeming grace of this book is that grandparents and great grandparents who already know the music and lyrics will share the book, Wells’ illustrations, and the music with children in one on one quality time.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Harburg, E. Y. and Harold Arlen.  OVER THE RAINBOW.  Illus by Julia Noonan.
    New York: HarperCollins, 2002.  32p.  0-06-028949-X; hb., $15.95
    0-06-02500-7;   lib.bdg., $15.89  2001-039680  PreS-Gr. 4+     782.42

    The song made famous by Judy Garland in the feature film THE WIZARD OF OZ, features lyrics and music.  The picture book begins with the darkness of a storm watched by a girl and her kitten.  The illustrations lighten as the girl begins to dream “once in a lullaby.”   When the girl wakes up from her dream sequence, the illustrations are lighter.  This book will be a sentimental favorite with grandmothers and great-grandmothers who will check it out of libraries or purchase it for personal giving.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Hildebrand, Will.  DOWN BY THE STATION.  Illus. by the author. San Diego:
    Gulliver/Harcourt, 1999. unp.   0-15-201804-2; hb., $15.00   98-41770
    PreS-Gr.2    782.42   or      E

     Hildebrand uses mixed media to tell his version of a familiar song.  As usual, Hildebrand adds to the text with his illustrations.  A girl rides around in a zoo on a train which picks up animals as it travels.   There is lots of repetition in the cumulative noises of the engineer and animals so children can "read" the book themselves after singing it several times.  Music is included at the end of the book.  Recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Hoberman, Mary Ann.  BILL GROGAN’S GOAT.  Illus by Nadine Bernard Westcott.
    Tingley/Little, 2002.  32p.  0-316-36232-8; hb., $14.95  00-050008  PreS-Gr. 3   E

    Westcott’s watercolor and pen and ink illustrations provide more than their share of humor to this extension of a favorite children’s song.  Two lines of the rhyming song appear on the end papers.  Hoberman has expanded the rhyme to include a sheep, pig, and cow and the humor continues through the book until the end.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Hoberman, Mary Ann.  THE EENSY-WEENSY SPIDER.  Illus. by Nadine
    Wbernard Westcott.  Boston: Little, 2000.  32p. 0-316-36330-8; $12.95
    99-25701   PreS-Gr. 1   782.42164   or   E      PAULIN'S PICKS

     Does the world need another picture book about the eensy-weensy spider?  The answer is a resounding yes.  Hoberman begins with the original four lines but adds eleven more verses.  Hoberman's humor shines through with buying three pair of shoes, needing six band aides for a skinned knee, and lending a helping leg or two.  You can begin reading this book aloud to children but you will end singing it instead.  The ink and watercolor end papers flow into lyrics and music and diagrams for playing the hand motions and add to the total presentation of the book.  Westcott and Hoberman make a perfect team.  Even if you have other copies of this finger play, choose this book for personal, preschool, school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Hoberman, Mary Ann.  THERE ONCE WAS A MAN NAMED MICHAEL
    FINNEGAN.  Illus. by Nadine Bernard Westcott.  Boston:  Little, 2001.  32p.
    0-316-36301-4; hb., $14.95.   99-057266   PreS-Gr. 3    E    or   782.42

    The successful team of Hoberman and Westcott have again created a humorous picture book from a favorite children's song in the same manner as THE EENSY-WEENSY SPIDER (Little, 2000).  The music and lyrics of the original song begin the book but Hoberman has added new verses to the song to create a funny story about a man whose dog is the only one who appreciates his violin playing.  As usual, Wescott's watercolors add significantly to the enjoyment of the book.  This is a winner for preschool, elementary school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Lass, Bonnie and Philemon Sturges. WHO TOOK THE COOKIES FROM
    THE COOKIE JAR?  Illus by Ashley Wolff.  Boston:  Little, 2000.  32p.
    316-82016-4; hb., $14.95    99-16877    PreS-Gr. 2     E

    Wolff uses watercolor and pen to illustrate this favorite action song.  The refrain has been rewritten by Lass and Sturges.  There is even a new storyline to this book--it is the ants that take the cookies and all the animals follow the crumbs where they have a picnic of cookies with the ants.  This book has a desert theme with desert animals so will be useful when studying deserts or the southwest.  The animals in the story are skunk, mouse, raven, squirrel, rabbit, turtle, raccoon, snake, beaver, frog, and ants.  Directions for playing the game are given at the beginning of the book along with the music and lyrics.  This is a solid choice for picture book collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Long, Sylvia.  HUSH LITTLE BABY.  Illus. by the author.  San Francisco:
    Chronicle, 1997. 32p.   O-8118-1416-5, hb.,  $12.95.     96-28724.
    PreS-Gr. 1      782.4   or    E

     In an introduction, Long explains why she wrote this parody of  "Hush Little Baby."  Long explains that the folk song explains what mommy will buy for baby (mockingbird; diamond ring) but she wanted the mother to provide love instead of just buying things.  The pen and ink and watercolor illustrations show a mother and baby rabbit who share experiences like hummingbirds, crickets, and shooting stars.  The favorite page for librarians is "When that star has dropped from view, Mama's going to read a book to you."  This book is recommended for all libraries and for personal giving.
        Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Manning, Jane, illus.  WHO STOLE THE COOKIES FROM THE COOKIE JAR?
    Playtime Rhymes.  New York: HarperFestival, 2001.  12p.  0-694-01515-6;
    bd.bk., $7.95  BB

    Although the pages are not as thick as most board books, the pages are much thicker than regular picture books.  This thickness, the small size, and the topic make this book a candidate for the board book section of libraries in day care centers, preschools, and public libraries.  Because the game is so much fun, the book is suitable for kindergartners also.  There are no directions for when to clap along with the story but most people who work with children in various institutions already know the score.  The appealing animals that appear in the text and pictures are dog, cat, mouse, bunny, and piggy.  This is also a good book for personal giving.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Paxton, Tom.  THE JUNGLE BASEBALL GAME.  Illus. by Karen Lee Schnidt.
    New York:  Morrow, 1999.  Unp.    0-688-13979-5; hb., $16.00    0-688-13980-9;
    lib.bdg., $15.93  97-06459   PreS-Gr. 3     E   or    782

     The hippos challenge the monkeys' baseball team to a game and the monkeys laugh and call  them slowpokes because they are hefty.  At first glance, the uniforms would indicate that the monkeys are boys and the hippos are girls but the names on the back of the pink hippo uniforms include both boy and girl names;  Homer Harry and Leapin' Liz.  The hippos come from behind after they buckled down.    Although the monkeys call their opponents "tubby guys" and are sure they will win, the hippos make a spectacular catch and the game is over.  Schmidt's illustrations, especially those showing the animals with their mouths open to yell their cheer, are humorous.    Music is included for this story-song by an internationally known folk singer.  For variety during storytime, sing this song accompanied by a guitar.    Read CASEY AT THE BAT and you have an instant program with a baseball theme.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Peek, Merle, Illus. ROLL OVER !  A COUNTING SONG. New York: Houghton Mifflin,
    1981. 24p.   0-395-98037-2;   bd.bk., $5.95   80-16675   PreS-K    398.8    or    BB

     This favorite counting song translates well to board book format.  The song begins with ten, 9 animals in the bed with a child.  As the song unfolds, the numbers go down until the child is alone at the end.  Music and lyrics appear on the last two pages. This is a solid purchase for preschools, public libraries, and home libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Philip, Neil, comp.  WEAVE LITTLE STARS INTO MY SLEEP:  NATVE
    AMERICAN LULLABIES.  Photos by Edward Curtis.  New York:  Clarion, 2001p.
    0-618-08856-3; hb., $16.00  00-060324  Gr. K-9+   782.421

    Beginning with an Ojibwa "Firefly Song," Philips shares 15 Native American lullabies and has selected accompanying full page sepia photos from a famous photographer whose five volume set was published between 1907-09 and later volumes between 1911-1930.  Although the photos, except in several instances, do not match the tribe of the lullaby, they are labeled with the correct tribe which is often a related group.  The afterword explains lullabies in general and Native American lullabies in particular and is typical of Philip's find scholarship.  Since most schools study Native Americans, this is an essential purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Preszler, June.  JOHN LENNON.  Mankato, MN:  Capstone Press, 2005  32p.
            ISBN 0-73682701-3 hb.   Gr. 3-6   j782.42166

            John Lennon’s musical career is covered thoroughly in this photo illustrated book.  Readers will learn about Lennon’s time with the Beatles and his solo career after marrying Yoko Ono.  The book highlights Lennon’s role in the peace movement.  His songs remain favorites of an entire generation of rock fans.  This book would make a fine addition to public or school libraries.
            Lynette Suckow, Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI

Priceman, Marjorie.  FROGGIE WENT A-COURTING:  AN OLD TALE
    WITH A NEW TWIST.  Illus. by the author.  Boston: Little, 2000.  32p.
    0-316-71227-2; hb., $14.95.    99-25703  PreS-Gr.3   782.42162     E

     Librarians looking for the perfect marriage of illustrations and text will find it in the cut paper and gouache illustrations in this adaptation of a famous folk song.   Priceman has chosen New York City as the setting for her adaptation, "Froggie went a-courting, he did ride/A taxicab to the Upper West Side."    When frog proposes to mouse he writes it on the famous electronic billboard at Times Square.  Other New York landmarks include the Statue of liberty where the wedding party takes place and a wedding cake as tall as the Empire State building make this book useful when studying states.   Many humorous touches appear in the illustrations, like Miss Mousie reading  "Modern Mouse Bride."
     There is one unsettling circumstance in the book.  Early in the song,  Auntie Rat rushes in and says "You cannot marry an amphibian!  A slimy frog–he's not our kind!"   This remark is in extremely bad taste but the consequences are even more extreme.  The cat eats rat and "...there's no denial,/ Aunt Rat at last made someone smile."
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Rodanas, Kristina, illus.  THE LITTLE DRUMMER BOY.  Based on words and music by
    Katherine Davis, Henry Onorati, and Harry Simeone, 1958, 1986.  New York:  Clarion, 2001.
    32p.  0-395-97015-6; lib.bdg., $15.00  00-047455   Gr. K+  782.42

    All three verses of this carol, including a musical score, appear on the last page.  These words, a phrase at a time, provide the text for this picture book.   The colored pencil and watercolor illustrations include many double page spreads which help interpret the text.  One double page spread that illustrates "I played my best for Him" shows light behind the boy making him look like he has angel wings.  The manger scene is portrayed as a primitive hut made of sticks, the drum is typical of the area and not the one often portrayed on Christmas cards, and the people have Jewish features.  The total effect makes this an excellent addition to Christmas collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Schanzer, Rosalyn.  THE OLD CHISHOLM TRAIL: A COWBOY SONG.
    Washington, DC:  National Geographic, 2001.  32p.  0-7922-7559-4; hb.,
    $16.95    00-012382     Gr. K-3

    This song of the wild west tells about how cattle drives went up the Chisholm Trail from Texas to the railroads in Abilene, Kansas.  According to the introduction, the song originally had a thousand verses to describe the trip.  Numerous verses are included and the familiar refrain “Come a ki yi yippy yippy yay, yippy yay! Come a ki yi yippy yippy yay!   Lyrics for two verses with music appear at the end of the book.  The illustrations are a combination of cartoon and folk art.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Seskin, Steve and Allen Shamblin.  DON’T LAUGH AT ME.  Illus by Glin Dibley.
    Afterword by Peter Yarrow.  Book with CD.  Berkeley: Tricycle, 2002.  32p.
    1-58246-058-2; hb., $16.95.    2002-000549    PreS-Gr. 3   782.42

    Teachers are always looking for a book that they can use to share tolerance of other people but does so without didacticism.  Told in the first person by children (and one adult)  who are objects of teasing, the rhymes are catchy and strike at the heart.  “A little girl who never smiles ‘cause I’ve got braces on my teeth./And I know how it feels/to cry myself to sleep.”  The illustrations are exaggerated but portray the children just right.  Lyrics and music are given for four verses including a chorus: “Don’t laugh at me.  Don’t call me names.  Don’t get your pleasure from my pain.  In God’s eyes we’re all the same.  Someday we’ll all have perfect wings.  Don’t laugh at me.  I’m fat, I’m thin, I’m short,  I’m tall, I’m dead, I’m blind.  Hey aren’t we all?”  In the Afterword, Peter Yarrow, of Peter, Paul, and Mary fame, tells how he and his daughter first heard Seskin sing the song at a folk festival.  Based on the song, Peter founded  “Operation Respect: “Don’t Laugh at Me” which shared the song to over 10,000 schools and 2,500 summer camps for free.   A website, <www.don’t laugh.org> offers ideas to parents and others who want to introduce the song to children.   There is something in this book with which most people can identify, whether it is wearing thick glasses or being chosen last on the playground.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Simmons, Jane.  DAISY SAYS “HERE WE GO ‘ROUND THE MULBERRY BUSH.”
    Boston:  Little, 2002.  14p.  0-316-79811-8; bd.bk., $7.95    2001-230416   PreS   BB

    There are seven index tabs to this board book, each of them showing a creature. The last tab shows the moon that appears when little duck goes to sleep, making this a suitable bedtime book for preschoolers.  The verses are a takeoff on a familiar children’s song.  As this version begins, a duckling watches butterflies ’round the mulberry bush in the morning.  Children can make the actions, go ‘round, bounce, flap, hop, pounce, leap, and go to sleep.  Creatures are duck, bee, rabbit, kittens, and frog.  In larger, darker print at the bottom of the page are other action words kids can shout or act out; i.e., stomp, bong, flitter flutter, hoppity-hop, thump, and doing.  A companion book is DAISY SAYS “IF YOU‘RE HAPPY AND YOU KNOW IT.” (Little, 2002).  Purchase for preschools, public libraries, and personal giving.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Simmons, Jane.  DAISY SAYS “IF YOU‘RE HAPPY AND YOU KNOW IT.”
    Boston:  Little, 2002.  14p.  0-316-79940-8; bd.bk., $7.95      PreS   BB

    A familiar children’s song has a new twist.  This board book begins with the familiar duckling being happy with its mother.  The refrains are quack like a duck, cheep like a chick, squeak like a mouse, buzz like a bee, baa like a sheep, and oink like a pig.  The seven index tabs for the creatures begin and end with the duckling but there is one for each of the other animals.  When using the book individually with children, ask them to find the animals using the tabs.  Like the companion book, DAISY SAYS “HERE WE GO ‘ROUND THE MULBERRY BUSH.” (Little, 2002), this book will provide preschoolers with hours of enjoyment singing to themselves after the book has been introduced to them.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Sweet, Melissa.  FIDDLE-I-FEE.  Adapted and illus by M. Sweet.  Boston:
    Tingley/Little, 1992, 2002.  22p.  0-316-75861-2; bd. Bk., $5.95  PreS  BB

    Although this board book is longer than usual because it came from a picture book, the familiar folk song fits well into the new format.  The board book allows children to participate on a more intimate level and at an earlier age.  The nine animals are all familiar to children and the sounds are different but fun; “Pig went griffy-gruffy.”  No music is included but most people know the song.  Unfortunately, very small libraries that already own the picture book may not be able to afford it in this format.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

 Taback, Simms.   JOSEPH HAD A LITTLE OVERCOAT.  Illus. by author.
    New York: Viking, 1999.  32p.  0-670-87855-3 hb., $15.99.    PreS-Gr.3     780

     Taback retells his favorite childhood song in this winner of the 2000 Caldecott  Medal.  From cover to cover this story is a performance revealed through a folk  art style.  The illustrator uses  collage, gouache, pencil, ink and watercolor, but the die cuts set this book apart.  Younger children will want to predict what the next use of the fabric will be, and older readers will notice the subtle theatrical references throughout the book. Taback's final note to the readers is followed by the musical score needed to perform this piece with children.
    Sandra Imdieke, Professor, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI
    *Editor's Note: Imdieke was a member of the 2000 Caldecott Committee, ALSC/ALA

 Turpin, Nicholas and Marie Greenwood, eds. THE FIRST NOEL:   A CHILD'S BOOK
    OF CHRISTMAS CAROLS TO PLAY AND SING.
  Illus. by many artists.  New York:
    Dorling Kindersley, 1998.  32p.  0-7894-3483-0., hb., $12.95    98-23310    Gr. 3-6+   782.28

   Of the thirteen carols, all them are religious except for  "We Wish You a Merry Christmas."  Each carol is illustrated with reproductions of museum art and has music and lyrics with 3-4 verses included.  Arrangements are for piano and guitar.  If your collection needs more Christmas carols, then purchase this attractive anthology.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Westcott, Nadine Bernard.  SKIP TO MY LOU.  Adapted and illus. by Westcott.
    Boston: Little, 1989, 2000.  32p.    0-316-93091-1; bd. bk, $5.95     PreS     BB

    This title translates from picture book to board book with gusto.  The type is large enough and the illustrations are detailed and intimate.   As ususal with Westcott's books, the pictures tell as much as and add to the text to make a superb book.  The interpretation of this song is different from the expected but is humorous, imaginative, and just right.  A boy is left in charge of his grandparent's farm for one day and the animals take over the house, make a mess, and clean up just in time for his grandparent's return.  Besides being a great preschool and public library addition, the board book format makes a sturdy book for long family car rides.  The only problem with the book is that it is impossible to read and must be sung again and again and again.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Whippo, Walt, lyricist.  LITTLE WHITE DUCK.  Music by Bernard Zartzky.
    Illus. by Joan Paley.  Boston: Little, 2000. Music c.1950.    Illus. c 2000.   32p.
    0-316-03227-1; hb., $13.95  99-13661  PreS-Gr.2      782.4   

     Lyrics and music for the chorus appear at the beginning of this picture book.  Colorful collages, large enough to be seen by a story hour group, add interest to this song.  The illustrations are easily replicated for a bulletin board.  Because the mouse is singing the song about the white duck and the other creatures including a green frog, black bug, red snake, the book could be used when teaching colors to preschoolers.  This book is easily adapted for a flannel board, overhead projector, or puppet presentation.  This is an excellent purchase for home, preschool, elementary school, and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Winter, Jeannette, illus.  THE ITSY-BITSY SPIDER.  San Diego: Red Wagon/Harcourt,
     2000.  26p.  0-15-202130-2;  bd.bk., $4.95.   PreS-K      BB

     One purpose of board books is to help children learn to turn pages and to "read" from from left to right but that is not the purpose of this board book.  The book has to be held sideways and read like a calendar otherwise the writing on the page does not make sense.  The small size is for little hands to hold while singing a favorite nursery song.  This is a very personal book and children will love it.  Because of its small size, libraries will find it difficult to place ownership and date due markings on it but it is worth the effort.  This is also a good choice for day care and home collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
 

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7xx MUSIC

Lester, Julius.  THE BLUES SINGERS:  TEN WHO ROCKED THE WORLD.
    Illus. by Lisa Cohen.  New York:  Jump at the Sun/Hyperion, 2001.  47 p.
    0-7868-0463-7; hb., $15.99   00-59019     Gr. 4-10   781.643

    This biography of ten black blues musicians is told by in the voice of a grandfather telling his granddaughter about musicians he or his father heard.   The introduction sets up this scenario and talks about the roots of blues from slavery times because it made singing them feel better.  "Honey if it wasn't for the blues, we probably wouldn't have anything to listen to except our toenails growing."  The musicians featured are Bessie Smith (Empress of the blues), Robert Johnson (who improvised from "reciting from a feeling), Mahalia Jackson (brought the blues feeling into church music), Muddy Waters, (A blues and rock and roll hall of famer) Billie Holiday ("unquestionably the most important influence on American popular singing"), B. B. King (musician to presidents and the Queen), Ray Charles ("The Genius"), Little Richard ("In the history of rock 'n roll, there is probably no one more important...") James Brown Godfather of soul), and Aretha Franklin ("...towered above the rest.").  The biographies are told with flair and the page layouts are interesting.  Each entry begins with a full-page portrait of the musician, birth and death dates with places, and a quote about them.  This biography can be enjoyed by people of all ages.  A bibliography and recommended listening follow.  Highly recommended.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

Woog, Adam.  THE IMPORTANCE OF FRANK SINATRA.  Farmington Hills, MI: 
    Lucent/Gale, 2001.  108 p.  1-56006-7490-7; lib. Bdg., $27.45      Gr. 6-10      782.42 

    This is one of 50+ titles in "The Importance of..." series including biographies of individuals from the worlds of politics, sports, music, art, literature, science and religion. Within the larger context of the entire series the reader might find the answer to the first question that springs to the reviewer's mind, " What middle school student would find Frank Sinatra important?"  As stated in the Forward, "Each volume attempts to emphasize an individual's contribution both in his or her own time and for posterity."   Primary and secondary sources are used and quotes are footnoted.  This volume includes photographs, bibliography, chronology and an index.  It serves as an example of how a biographer researches a subject as well as a view of the life and times and contributions of the subject.  Chapters are prefaced with a quote and bold subbtitles, black and white photos and boxed excerpt from other works on Sinatra  break up long pages of print and Pique the reader's interest.  Other features include a bibliography, index, footnotes, and black and white photographs. 
    Sinatra is presented as one of the great popular entertainers of his time and as an individual who lived the American Dream.  He was the son of immigrants who rose to fame and fortune through his talent and hard work.  Presenting his foibles and inadequacies as well as his admirable qualities bring him to life as a "real" person.  Pete Hamill writes that, " One reason he continues to matter is that he perfected the role of the Tender Tough Guy - an archetype that did not exist in American culture and created a new model for American masculinity."
     While some adults may object to exposing middle school students to the less savory side of life in the form of promiscuity and connections to the criminal underworld, most children that age have already heard of the excesses of today's music and sports idols and should be able to put it in perspective.
    Carolyn Anderson, L'Anse; retired elementary teacher,  L’Anse School and Public Library Advisory Board  
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791.4 MOTION PICTURES-RADIO-TV

Baker, Frank.  COMING DISTRACTIONS, QUESTIONING MOVIES.  Mankato, MN:  
            Capstone Press, 2006. 32p. ISBN  97807368-6766-5
hb.  $16.00  Gr. 3-5     j 791.43

             The author, Frank Baker, shows his expertise as an educational consultant as he brings media literacy into the classroom and into this book.  COMING DISTRACTIONS explains the vocabulary of the media in movie making and uses the current jargon, such as JPM or jolts per minute.   Famous people influence what we think, the products we want to buy and the movie's potential for success.  Products are placed within a film to influence buyer awareness and increase sales.  Market research is a key to success for predicting who will see the film, using the age of the audience, story line, humor, etc.
            The author also brings in negative points of media influence, including stereotyping and deliberate omissions of the unhappy moments in life. Making movies is a business, the business of selling people a product or idea. This book brings out the fact that everyone should remember what happens in a movie is not real life, but entertainment with commercials. This well-written and well-laid out book is worth reading and a great way to encourage discussion of how society is manipulated by commercials and the media.
            Jana Aho, Media Assistant, Gladstone School and Public Library, Gladstone, MI

Barron, Neil, ed. FANTASY AND HORROR: A CRITICAL AND HISTORICAL GUIDE
    TO LITERATURE, ILLUSTRATIONS FILM, TV, RADIO, AND THE INTERNET.
    Lanham, MD: Scarecrow, 1999.  816p.    0-8108-3596-7; hb., $85.00  Gr. 9-12+   700.415   

    The 8 articles about gothic and fantastic literature from 1761-1998 which begin this book each have annotated bibliographies, some of which contain 500 titles.  Ten other chapters include secondary literature and research aids, magazines, Internet sites, lists of best books, awards and winners, series, organizations, and conventions.  Purchase this outstanding source for high school and college collections for student genre research or for collection development.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Mattern, Joanne.  TOM CRUISE.  People in the News series.  San Diego:  Lucent, 2001.
    96p.  1-56006-827-2; lib.bdg., $27.45   00-010559      Gr. 5-10+   791.43  or  92

    Tom Cruise survived childhood hardships such as an absent father, frequent moves, poverty, dyslexia, and a reputation as a dreamer.  Born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV, Cruise changed his name to include only his mother’s maiden name because of the divorce and loss of his father from his life.  The book follows Cruise's movie career and discusses all of his movies from Endless Love (1981) to Mission Impossible II (2000).  The view of the films is balanced and includes information about critics, the audience, and monetary results of all films, good or bad.  A filmography is included as a sidebar.  Attention is given to Cruise’s work with superstars like Paul Newman, Dustin Hoffman, and Jack Nicholson.  A whole chapter is devoted to Cruise's family life with his children and wife, Nicole Kidman.  Mattern stresses that Cruise is a good father to his adopted children as opposed to the non-parenting of his father. Although the copyright is 2001, the book was written before the very public Cruise/Kidman filing for divorce in February of 2001.  Scheer also discusses Cruise's first marriage, his religion and the rumor that Cruise is gay.  The sidebars, many of which are generic to movies, are a bonus: New York City as a mecca for the performing arts, the role of stunt people, the Golden Globes, the role of producers, and defining tabloids. Personal sidebars are on Dyslexia and the controversial Church of Scientology including other famous actor members.  Biography sidebars include: Francis Ford Coppola, Paul Newman, Nicole Kidman, Stanley Kubrick, and the “real” top guns.  The notes are extensive.  Lists of important dates, further reading, works consulted, and the index are valuable.  The black and white photos appear on every other page and although all are not sharp, they add interest to the text.  This book will be popular for recreational reading because Cruise is one of the leading men in movies today and the information about movies in general makes this book doubly useful as a popular cultural title.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Nardo, Don.  WALT DISNEY.  Illus. with photos. The Importance Of series.  San Diego:  Lucent, 2000.  
     96 p.  1-56006-605-9; lib.bdg., $23.70       99-16772    Gr. 6-9        921  or  791.43

     Although he is known for his animated cartoons, Nardo also gives attention to Disney's  life-action adventures, live action comedies, science and nature programs, family films, Mickey Mouse Club, numerous television series, theme parks, movie complexes, feature films, and marketing expertise.  Information is given about Mickey Mouse, Dumbo, Davy Crockett, Zorro, The Shaggy Dog, Winnie the Pooh.  Decades after his death, the Disney image is clean and wholesome entertainment.
     All facets of Disney's life and career are included and not all of it is flattering.  Disney, a perfectionist and not given to praise, was very demanding of his employees and was moody, grouchy, and insulting to those who displeased him.  Walt told employees that their work would have to be credited to him.  In order to spend time with him, Disney's wife had to go to the office in the middle of the night and sleep on the couch while he worked.  His brother, Roy, was eight years older than Walt and although they worked together in a business called Disney Brothers Studio, the name was changed to Walt Disney Studio.  Disney was also obsessed with death.
     Valuable additions to the book are a time line, chapter notes, for further reading, works consulted, and an index.  There are black and white photos on every other page as well as numerous sidebars to add interest.  This book will be read for reports and for pleasure.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Oleksy, Walter.  CHRISTOPHER REEVE.  People in the News series.  San Diego:  Lucent, 2000.  
    112p.  1-56006-534-6; lib.bdg., $23.70   99-29830   Gr. 6-9+    791.43   or   921

     Primary and secondary sources are part of this series and in this case, many interviews and articles as well as frequent references to Reeves' autobiography, STILL ME, appear in this book.  The full texts of Reeve's speeches at the Oscar Ceremonies and at the Democratic Convention, both after his accident, are included.   A divorce in Christopher's family caused him to seek approval from his natural father even though he related to his step-father.  Because his father was interested in politics and social causes, Christopher also became involved in several causes including defending creative freedom in Chile, defending the National Endowment for the arts, founding a research and rehabilitation centers, and lobbying Congress on behalf of medical benefits and funding for research.  A full account of all of Reeves acting includes live theater, a soap opera, the four Superman movies, the Cult movie, "Somewhere in Time,"  and other films.  Sixteen pages are devoted to the Superman movies.
     During his high school days, Reeve hid his insecurity through acting and played the part of the "All-American Boy."   Reeve was active in sports, a good student, and cooperative.  Because he went to an all male school, he even played a sixty-fie year old woman.  When he was in Cornell, he majored in English and music but took drama classes also. While at Juilliard, Reeve made friends with Robin Williams.  There are several ironies in his life: Reeve's stepfather did not allow his stepsons to read comic books and Reeves was allergic to horses.  Because of his mother's two unhappy marriages, Reeves had a fear of commitment and had two children in a relationship with a British woman but did not marry until he met an American to whom he is still married.  Brushes with death include experiences with planes, gliders, and horses.  The accident with the horse, his fifty-fifty operation, rehabilitation, and continuing activism are covered.  This book will appeal to a variety of audiences, those who do not want to read his longer autobiography, those who want to know more about Superman, activists for handicapped rights, and those who want to hear about his accident, injury, surgery, and road to recovery.  This is an versatile purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Reynolds, David West.  STAR WARS: EPISODE I, INCREDIBLE CROSS-SECTIONS;
    THE DEFINITIVE  GUIDE TO THE CRAFT OF STAR WARS .  Illus. by Hans Jenssen
    and Richard Chasemore.    New York: Dorling  Kindersley, 1999. 32p.  0-7894-3962-X;
    $19.95    All ages.  791.43

    Libraries without a security system will be glad this book is oversize because it will be difficult to hide in a backpack or under a jacket.  Fanatic fans of the new Star Wars film will pour over every detail of the14 vehicles as if they were functioning spacecraft.  There are cross sections of each of the 14 with every part labeled and a sidebar giving the Data File which includes such information such as manufacturer and number of crew, including droids.  Some of the vehicles included are: the Gungan Sub; Naboo Queen's Royal Starfish; and 18 podracers.  A four-page foldout of the Droid Control Ship is spectacular.  Public libraries will have fans clamoring for this book.  School libraries may have to dip into special gift funds to purchase this high interest book.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

 Reynolds, David West.  STAR WARS:  EPISODE I, THE VISUAL DICTIONARY.
    Illus. with photos.  New York:    Dorling Kindersley, 1999.  64p.  0-789404701-0;
    $19.95    All ages.  791.43

     Reynolds, who has a Ph.D. in archeology from the University of Michigan, treats the characters of the Star Wars film as if they were "a culture from another time and place to explore."  Thirty-three characters (The Phantom Menace, R2-D2, Darth Maul, and Anakin and Shmi Skywalker) or groups of characters  (Droidekas or the Queen's Handmaidens) are featured on a page.  Each is explained in the context of the story and their various apparatus like Qui-Gon Jinn's lightsaber, Captain Panaka's blaster, or the Stith apprentice's (Darth Maul) electrobinoculars. Because Anakin Skywalker is 9 years old, this book will engage fans from that age up.  StarWars fans will clamor fo  this book.  Elementary school libraries will have to find funds to purchase it to entice readers.  Public libraries probably have it on their list already.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Reynolds, David West. STAR WARS: INCREDIBLE CROSS-SECTIONS,
    THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO STAR WARS VEHICLES AND SPACECRAFT.
    Illus by Hans Jenssen and Richard Chasemore.  New York: DK, 1998.  32p.
    0-7894-3480-6,  $19.95; 0-7894-3865-8, $39.95.  98-22878.  $29.95.  Gr2+    791.43

    The oversized format of this book is similar to other Cross-Sections books and  Jenssen, one of the illustrators, has worked on other books in that series. Intricate drawings of 15 vehicles from Star Wars movies include the Millennium Falcon, Snowspeeder, and T-65 X-Wing. The author has his doctorate in archeology and has written scientific archeological publications.  According to the book jacket, "He approaches the world of Star Wars like ancient Rome or Egypt, considering it ‘a culture from another time and place to explore'."  This book will fly off the shelves even without the release of the newest Star Wars movie.
     Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Teasley, Alan B. and Ann Wilder.  REEL CONVERSATIONS: READING FILMS
    WITH YOUNG ADULTS.  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1997.  202p.
    0-86709-377-3;  pb., $22.00    96-30441    Adults    791.43

    Have you ever  wondered why, if students spend so much time watching TV and movies,  we don't  teach them to view critically?  The authors provide a rationale for including film in the English/language arts curriculum as well as practical hands-on strategies for teaching film.  Specifics include:  principles for film selection; legal use of videotapes and off-air taping; reading a movie on three levels, literary, dramatic, and cinematic; gathering information and writing a film review; characteristics of specific film genres; film across the curriculum; YA novels for thematic units, periodicals that support film study, and chapter film lists.  Five chapters include annotated bibliographies of films with adolescent protagonists on the following themes: coming of age; families; belonging; dreams and conquests; and love and romance.  This book is an essential purchase for middle and high school media centers and university collections in education and library schools.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
 
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791.5 PUPPETRY

Pollock, Jean M.  SIDE BY SIDE: TWELVE MULTICULTURAL PUPPET PLAYS.
    Lanham, MD:   Scarecrow,1998.  143p. 0-8108-3362-X; pb., $29.50   97-20542  791.5
    Included for each of the plays are: production notes; puppeteers and puppets; props and scenery; action; program building including classroom study units;  bibliography and grade levels for performers and audiences from K-8.  Shorter versions for two puppeteers appears in the appendix.  A bibliography of puppet materials is extremely helpful.   Maps and a list of countries and cultures represented  would have been helpful so that adults wouldn't have to ferret out the information from the text.  Recommended for elementary, public, and university library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Weare, Tim.  I’M A LITTLE CATERPILLAR.  A Finger-Puppet Pal series.  New York:
    Scholastic, 2002.   12p.   0-439-33867-0; bd.bk, $6.95.   PreS-K   BB

    A little caterpillar imagines what he will be one day and discards several possibilities including a roaring lion, long-tailed dinosaur, upside-downy bat, sharp-clawed bear but decides on being a flower-flitting butterfly.   The story is told in the first person by a latex finger-puppet that comes through the die cut holes to be part of each double-page spread.   Although he is an orange color, the caterpillar looks more like a frog than a caterpillar.  When he is a butterfly, he doesn’t look quite right because he doesn’t have any antennae.  The book is similar to Weare’s I’M A LITTLE PENGUIN (Scholastic, 2002) which is a better book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Weare, Tim.  I’M A LITTLE PENGUIN.  A Finger-Puppet Pal series.  New York:
    Scholastic, 2002.   12p.   0-439-33868-9; bd.bk, $6.95.   PreS-K   BB

    A little penguin is lost and decides to follow his parents’ footprints in the snow.  He finds other animals and says to all of them: “Is it my mom?  Is it my dad?”  They all answer by telling who they are:  a seal, a whale, an albatross, and a fish.  The story is told in the first person by the little latex penguin finger puppet that comes through the die cut holes to be part of each double-page spread.  The book is similar to Weare’s I’M A LITTLE CATERPILLAR but this is a much better book.  If you can only afford to buy one of the books, buy this one.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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792 THEATER

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792.8 DANCE

Ancona, George.  CAPOEIRA.  New York: Lee & Low Books, 2007.
          ISBN: 978-1-58430-268-1 hb. $18.95.   Gr. 3 - 6    j793.3

          A game, a dance, a martial art, Capoeira began in Brazil by African slaves in the 16th Century. Now it is being taught in academies in this country but is played throughout the world by boys, girls, men and women.  Students learn movementss, some of which imitate those of animals, performed to music. Players don't actually hit each other as they perform ritualistic attack and defensive moves to the accompaniment of tamborine, drums and other primitive instruments.  Abundant photographs and illustrations depict the many moves of the skilled capoeirist and would appeal to those interested in martial arts.
           Judy Bennett, Clerk, Ironwood Carnegie Library

Cooper, Elisha. DANCE!.  Illus. by author.  New York: Greenwillow/Harper,
    2001. 32p.  0-06-029418-3; hb., $15.95  00-041102    K-3+     E   or   793.8

    Sparse, but effective, illustrations take wannabe (and experienced) dancers through a sequence of happenings leading up to a professional performance.  Cooper portrays the dancers in continual motion to express the troupe's passion and dedication for the art.  Dancers seem to fly across the pages with the text being formatted in curves and around corners to provide the interested child with a believable, yet enjoyable experience.  The authentic scenes, the storehouse of information, and the ingenious creativity of the author deserve a hearty applause!
    Patricia Fittante; Children’s Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Tallchief, Maria and Rosemary Wells.  TALLCHIEF: AMERICA'S PRIMA BALLERINA.
    Illus. by Gary Kelley.   New York: Viking, 1999. unp.    0-670-88756-0; hb., $15.99.
    98-35783   Gr. 2-8   92    or    792.028

   In the introduction, Wells tells how her own mother was a ballerina who was on the stage when the 16-year-old Tallchief saw a Russia ballet for the first time.  The book, written in the first person, tells of Maria's early days and ends when she went to New York for further ballet studies.  Readers learn that Maria was born on an Osage Indian Reservation in Oklahoma to a mother who was Scots-Irish and a father who was a full blooded Osage.  Readers learn that when she was a child the native culture and language were against the law to practice so ceremonies were held in secret.  The family moved to Los Angeles where she learned that her former teacher had taught her incorrectly and she had to unlearn and begin again.  Maria was born with music flowing through her veins and was also an accomplished pianist but at the age of twelve she had to concentrate on just one, so she chose ballet.  A highlight of her young life was watching a troupe called the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo.  Then she knew that she too would travel around the world and dance. This book will be popular with budding ballerinas or students looking for  biographies of Native Americans or women.  This picture book biography is better than most and
will make a good addition to school and public library collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

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793.7 JOKES AND RIDDLES

Brown, Marc.  SCARED SILLY!  A HALLOWEEN BOOK FOR THE BRAVE.
    Boston:  Little, 1994.  64p.  93-13501  0-316-10372-1; pb., 7.95   Gr. K-4   810.8

    Over thirty poems, riddles, jokes, stories, and games make Halloween even more fun than it is.  The cast of authors, besides Brown, is impressive:  Yolen, Nash, Viorst, Ciardi, Prelutsky, Livingston, Schwartz, and more.  Brown even includes the recipe for playing the well-known spooky game he calls "How to Scare Your Friends"  that includes blindfolding friends and have them touch eyeballs that are really peeled grapes and vomit that is really cooked oatmeal as well as 5 other items.  This book is a first purchase for Halloween collections and the paperback price makes it affordable for classrooms.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855
 
Corwin, Judith Hoffman.  MY FIRST RIDDLES .  Illus. by the author.  New York: HarperFestival,
    1998.   24p.  0-694-01109-6, lib. bdg., $9.95   PreS-Gr3.   793.7  or   E    PAULIN'S PICKS

      One of each of the nine riddles are presented on one page;  then children have to turn the page to see the answer pictured with a one word caption opposite the next riddle.  The illustrations are sculptured fabric which utilize buttons to give it an even more 3-D look. The illustrations are bright and clear enough for preschoolers to appreciate.  Corwin's book disproves the claim that books are not interactive; readers will be drawn into group or individual participation.. This is a book for home, school and public library collections.  A colored age code, listing this book for ages 3 and up, will be helpful to parents.
     Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

Eisenberg, Lisa.  FUNNY BUNNY: HILARIOUS HARE-BRAINED EASTER RIDDLES
    Illus by Dave Klug.  Riddle in the Middle series.  New York:  HarperFestival,
    2003.  20p.  0-06-008821-4; pb., $5.99.   PreS-Gr. 1   394.26   or   793.6

    The  pages and half-pages are very sturdy and will stand up to the use that children will make of this riddle book.  The nine riddles are presented in a double-page spread that includes one side of a half page.  When the half page is turned, the answer appears.  The yolks/jokes about chicks, eggs, and bunnies are suitably funny for the audience and holiday.  Parents will have no trouble placing this book in Easter baskets but public libraries will have to decide whether to place it in holiday or in riddle collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Florian, Doughlas.  LAUGH-ETERIA.  Illus by the poet.  San Diego:  Harcourt,
    1999.  160p.  98-20047  0-15-202084-5; hb., $17.00   Gr. K-6    811.54
    PAULIN’S PICKS

    Over 150 poems are illustrated with brush and black ink sketches that add to the humor of the poems.  One of the poems, "Good Humor," is typical of the total book: "The poems in this book are meant to be humorous./If they are not,/Please laugh just to humor us."  Most of the poems are excellent for reading aloud.  This is the best poetry anthology of the year.  Purchase for all school, public, and home libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 

Helmer, Marilyn.  CRITTER RIDDLES.  Illus by Eric Parker.  Kids Can Read Alone series,
    Level 3.  Tonawanda, NY:  Kids Can, 2003.  32p. 1-55337-445-2; lib.bdg.,  $14.95
    1-55337-411-8; pb.,  $3.95     C2002-901546-4      Gr. 1-4      ER   or     818.54

    These 28 animal riddles are fun and contemporary.  The first one is “What do you call a lion who never tells the truth?”  The answer is “The Lyin’ King.”   There is a riddle per page; each riddle appears on the top of the page and the answer is at the bottom.  The illustration in the middle often provides a clue to the answer.  Emerging readers love riddles and this book has kid appeal.   Helmer’s YUMMY RIDDLES (Kids Can, 2003) and this title are both excellent values for school and public libraries.  “A Note to Parents and Teachers” also makes the paperback a good home purchase.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Helmer, Marilyn.  YUMMY RIDDLES.  Illus by Eric Parker.  Kids Can Read Alone series,
    Level 3.  Tonawanda, NY:  Kids Can, 2003.  32p.  1-55337-446-2-0;  lib.bdg., $14.95
    1-55337-412-6; pb., $3.95     C2002-902989-9     Gr. 1-4       ER   or    818.54

    The 28 riddles are about food.  There is a riddle per page; the riddle appears on the top of the page and the answer at the bottom.  The illustration in the middle often provides a clue to the answer.  The riddles are “tasty” and provide good practice for emerging readers.  This and a companion title, CRITTER RIDDLES (Kids Can, 2003), are valuable purchases for school and public libraries. “A Note to Parents and Teachers” also makes the paperback a good home purchase.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director; Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, Michigan

Horenstein, Henry.  A IS FOR...?  A PHOTOGRAPHER'S ALPHABET OF ANIMALS.
    Illus. with photos.   San Diego:   Gulliver/Harcourt, 1999.  unp.  0-15-201582-5; hb., $16.00
    98-31424   Gr. K-3+    590    or  E      PAULIN'S PICKS citation

     In a photographer's note at the end of the book, Horenstein explains that he shot 200 rolls of film or 7,000 pictures from which he selected the 56 pictures in this book.  "The images I was looking for had to be mysterious enough so you'd have to guess what animal was represented, and they had to be interesting enough so you'd want to take the time to guess."  Horenstein succeeded spectacularly.  Brown and white photos shows part of each animal with a capital letter.  This reader missed P for parrot (not a pigeon) U for urchin,  X for ox, and Y for yellow jacket but was proud to guess iguana, jellyfish, kudu, newt, ray, and tortoise.  Easier ones to guess are quail, vulture, ostrich, shark, and whale.  Fortunately there is an answer key at the end of the book with the a more descriptive picture and the name of the creature.  This picture book works as an alphabet book and also enriches animal studies.  This is a truly interactive book that will appeal to all ages.   No school or public library will want to miss this one.  The Caldecott committee needs to look at this one.
        Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI;

Maestro, Marco and Giulio.  GEESE FIND THE MISSING PIECE:  SCHOOL
    TIME RIDDLE RHYMES.   Illus. by Giulio Maesro.  I Can Read Series.
    New York: HarperCollins, 1999. 48p.     0-06-026220-6; hb.,   $14.95
    06-026221-4; lib.bdg., $14.89    98-4151   PreS-Gr. 3     818  or  793.7  or   E

    Emerging readers can participate in these riddles because each double or single page spread gives the riddle and then provides a phrase that has a word that rhymes with the answer which is provided on the next page.  This makes the book a very meaningful and fun easy reader for beginning readers. The 22 riddles can be used by older students as models for changing standard riddles to rhymes.   This is a first purchase for elementary school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI 49855

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793.73 PUZZLES AND GAMES

Acredolo, Linda and Susan Goodwyn.  BABY SIGNS FOR MEALTIME.
    Photos by Penny Gentieu.  HarperFestival, 2002.  20p.  0-06-009073-1; bd. Bk.,
    $6.95.    PreS    BB      PAULIN’S PICKS

    Two Ph.D.’s, authors of BABY SIGNS (McGraw-Hill, 2002), urge parents to “Talk to your baby before your baby can talk!”  Ten words are presented on the left page and directions for pantomiming the word appears on the right.  The first word in this book is “eat” and the direction, also shown by a photo, is “fingertips to lips.”  Another word is “hot” and the direction is “blow, blow, blow.”  Brief directions to parents are on the last page and include three parts: when to begin, how to do it, and improvising actions.  The photos of the infants are exceptionally clear and a variety of sexes and ethnic groups are represented.  Half of the words are nouns; others include: eat, drink, more, all gone, and hot.  This book and MY FIRST BABY SIGNS (HF, 2002) should be some of the first board books given to new mothers.  Even if board book funding is limited, public libraries and day centers should put these two titles on the top of their lists.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Acredolo, Linda and Susan Goodwyn.  MY FIRST BABY SIGN
    Photos by Penny  Gentieu.  HarperFestival, 2002.  20p.  0-06-009074-X;
    bd. Bk., $6.95  PreS    BB   PAULIN’S PICKS

    Two Ph.D.’s, authors of BABY SIGNS (McGraw-Hill, 2002), urge parents to “Talk to your baby before your baby can talk!”  Ten words are presented on the left page and directions for pantomiming the word appears on the right.  The first word in this book is “ball” and the direction, also shown by a photo, is “throwing motion.”  Another word is “baby” and the direction is “rock-a-bye motion.“  Brief directions to parents are on the last page and include three parts: when to begin, how to do it, and improvising actions.  The photos of the infants are exceptionally clear and a variety of sexes and ethnic groups are represented.  Unlike the first book, all the words in this one are nouns.  This book and BABY SIGNS FOR MEALTIMES (HF, 2002) should be some of the first board books given to new mothers.  Even if board book funding is limited, public libraries and day centers should put these two titles on the top of their lists.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Boteler, Alison.  THE DISNEY PARTY HANDBOOK.  New York:  Disney, 1997.  208p.   
    0-7868-5049-3; HB.,  $18.95 0-7868-4105-2; pb.,   $15.95     97-26148     Gr. 3+   793.2

    An unusual and original collection of themes are centered around Disney characters to bring the magic of Winnie the Pooh, Cinderella, Hercules and other popular Disney creations to a child's birthday party.  There are fourteen themes to choose from that show parents exactly how to put on a fabulous party.   In chapters arranged by character themes there are step-by-step instructions for creating appropriate invitations, coordinating decorations, a get-acquainted activity, a fantasy feature, related games, a delectable cake, clever ice-cream treats, and a catchy, but healthy, menu (recipes included). Pen and ink drawings clearly demonstrate the various projects.  Simplified instructions are organized, concise and helpful.  It is a book that will be checked out by adults time and again and guaranteed to make the guest of honor feel very special indeed.
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI

Krull, Kathleen.  HOUDINI: WORLD’S GREATEST MYSTERY MAN AND
            ESCAPE KING. 
Illus. By Eric Velasquez. New York: Walker Publishing
            Company, 2005.  ISBN 0802789536, hb. $16.95    Gr. 1-4    j793.8 KR

            Prepare to be dazzled!  Houdini is a constant favorite in any library and this book is a must purchase.  Written in a format that carries the reader through Houdini’s early life (he claimed Appleton, Wisconsin, as his hometown), through his death at age 52, this book will keep every child’s interest.  Houdini’s story makes you want to research further into this amazing man’s life.  Dedicated to perfecting his magic act, he practiced hours and hours never wavering from his goal of always preparing for any circumstance.  Sadly, who would have thought that the body he so carefully prepared would have been the cause of his death as a result of a burst appendix.  The illustrations are superb and give the pictures a real life quality.  The details of Houdini’s finest moments are captured, as well as the quality of the person he was.  Houdini took in and supported his whole family and was a loving husband to Bess, his wife and partner in "mystery and magic."  I highly recommend this book for a school or a public library.
            Jana Aho, Media Assistant, Gladstone School & Public Library, Gladstone, MI

Lass, Bonnie and Philemon Sturges. WHO TOOK THE COOKIES FROM THE COOKIE JAR? 
    Illus by Ashley Wolff.  Boston:  Little, 2000.  32p.  316-82016-4; hb., $14.95    PreS-Gr. 2     E

    Wolff uses watercolor and pen to illustrate this favorite action song.  The refrain has been rewritten by Lass and Sturges.  There is even a new storyline to this book--it is the ants that take the cookies and all the animals follow the crumbs where they have a picnic of cookies with the ants.  This book has a desert theme with desert animals so will be useful when studying deserts or the southwest.  The animals in the story are skunk, mouse, raven, squirrel, rabbit, turtle, raccoon, snake, beaver, frog, and ants.  Directions for playing the game are given at the beginning of the book along with the music and lyrics.  This is a solid choice for picture book collections.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Manning, Jane, illus.  WHO STOLE THE COOKIES FROM THE COOKIE JAR?
    Playtime Rhymes.  New York: HarperFestival, 2001.  12p.
    0-694-01515-6; bd.bk., $7.95  BB

    Although the pages are not as thick as most board books, the pages are much thicker than regular picture books.  This thickness, the small size, and the topic make this book a candidate for the board book section of libraries in day care centers, preschools, and public libraries.  Because the game is so much fun, the book is suitable for kindergartners also.  There are no directions for when to clap along with the story but most people who work with children in various institutions already know the score.  The appealing animals that appear in the text and pictures are dog, cat, mouse, bunny, and piggy.  This is also a good book for personal giving.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

O’Hare, Jeffrey, ed.  THE BIG BOOK OF WINTER FUN: PUZZLES, MAZES, JOKES,
    AND GAMES TO LAST THE ENTIRE SEASON.  Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills,
    2001.  64p.  1-59078-001-9; pb., $ 7.95   2001-092589      PreS-Gr.   793.73

    This activity book, compiled by the editors of Highlights for Children, has many projects that encourage writing in the book so that this interesting project book is for the individual child rather than library patrons.  Teachers may wish to laminate the pages for reuse or make transparencies that can be written on by children.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Schnur, Steven.  SPRING: AN ALPHABET ACROSTIC.  Illus. by Lesliei Evans.
    New York: Clarion,  1999.  32p.    0-395-82269-6; hb., $15.00    PreS-Gr. 3   793.73 

    Hand colored linoleum block prints add to the text in explaining signs of spring.  An acrostic means that each letter of a word provides the first letter of another word.  The first acrostic uses the word April to make this prose poem:
     "After days of
     Pouring
     Rain, the last
     Ice and snow finally
     Leave the earth."
The illustrations and acrostics are similar in Schnur's  AUTUMN (Clarion,1997 ).  Teachers will use both to provide examples for students to write their own acrostics.  These titles work as  picture books, alphabet books, nature books, poetry books, and as  puzzle books.  Highly recommended for home, school, and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI

Schnur, Steven.  SUMMER:  AN ALPHABET ACROSTIC.  Illustrated by Leslie Evans.
    New York: Clarion, 2001. 32p.  0-618-02372-0; hb., $15.00  PreS-Gr. 2      793.73

    The hand-colored linoleum blocks add significantly to this book about summer.  The first acrostic, awning, is not an easy one, but beach, cabin, and daisy are more easily recognized.  Xeric is a word most readers will have to look up in a dictionary but the use of X to make the Roman numeral for 12 is clever.  The illustrations are a mixture of modern and times past.  The campers carry backpacks and water bottles and both campers and joggers wear modern shoes but other linoleum prints show scenes from the past.  The farm scene shows an outdated tractor and an old lighthouse guides ships into port.  The swimming hole and band shell evoke times past, while a woodpile and village Fourth of July parade are comfortable in the present and the past.  Although at times the illustrations are mixed metaphors, this book is still a good choice.  Public librarians should display this book around the Fourth of July and Memorial Day because both holidays are included.  School librarians should provide the book to teachers whose classes are studying seasons and the alphabet.  The title helps explain to primary students the variety of events that will happen from the time school is out until classes resume in the fall.  Although not as successful as the previous titles, purchase this one to round out the series.  Libraries not owning AUTUMN (1997) and SPRING (1999) need to order them.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center

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794 INDOOR GAMES-CHESS-BOWLING

Lo, Ginnie.  MAHJONG ALL DAY LONG.  Illus. by Beth Lo, New York: Walker Publishing Co.
            2005. ISBN 0802789412 hb. $16.95    PreS-Gr. 2   j795.34  LO

            How fun! This book explains the enjoyment a Chinese family gets from playing the game of Mahjong. The illustrations do much to explain what the game of Mahjong is, "a four-person game, similar to gin rummy, but played with Chinese tiles instead of cards." This is a very old Chinese game brought to the United States from Shanghai in the 1920s. It is now regaining popularity. The story revolves around the children’s perception of the adults playing the game, the children interacting with the adults, and the fun, food and laughter that surrounds the play.   
            This story is a good illustration of the Chinese family and the tradition of Mahjong that carries through the generations. Nice team effort by the two sisters, Ginnie and Beth Lo, whose own families carry on the tradition. The illustrations are appealing to the age group, 3-8, with the neat addition of Chinese printing and explanation at the bottom of each page. It’s a good addition to any library as an example of Chinese tradition and culture at a young age level.
            Jana Aho, Media Assistant, Gladstone School & Public Library, Gladstone, MI


Peden, Greg.  TABLETOP HOCKEY:  TIPS FOR KIDS  Buffalo: Kids Can Press, 2000   
    32p.   1-555074-864-5; pb., $4.95      Gr. 2-5       794

    Given the popularity of tabletop hockey, this book is important reading for those who wish to improve their game.  Through the short, informative text augmented by photographs, players are instructed in playing skills, strategies and how best to utilize players in all the positions.  In addition to the basic instructional text, photos show the evolution of tabletop hockey games.  Many "expert tips" are included as well as a game day timeline for the Canada vs. U.S. final of the Upper Canada Irwin Cup tabletop hockey tournament.  Players of all ages will increas their enjoyment of the game by reading this book.
    Carolyn Anderson, L'Anse Public Library Board; Superiorland Library Cooperative Board

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796 ATHLETICS; OUTDOOR SPORTS

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796.48 OLYMPIC GAMES

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799  MUSIC

Reich, Susanna.  CLARA SCHUMANN: PIANO VIRTUOSO .  Illus. with photos.
    New York:  Clarion,   1999.  118p.    0-395-89119-1; hb., $18.00  98-24510
    Gr.4-8+    786.092    or      92
     Although Susanna Reich is the only author listed, she indicates in the preface that her mother, Nancy, visited many of the places Clara lived and performed as well as researched books, letters, diaries, newspapers, and music manuscripts in libraries and universities.  Nancy shared  scholarship with her daughter.  The last chapter contains interesting research techniques.  An extensive chronology and an index are also helpful.
    In 1819 Clara was born to a musician who married one of his pupils but their marriage was strained and their only daughter, Clara, did not speak until she was four years old.  Clara loved music and learned to play the piano then began to talk.  When Clara's parents divorced when she was four, the children lived with their father, which was typical of 19th century German law.  Frederick Wieck was a temperamental, demanding father who believed that his musical daughter could bring him recognition as a music teacher.  Clara made her professional debut at the age of 9, became a success and soon played all over Germany.  That same year Robert Schumann became a pupil of Clara's father and they became friends.  When Frederick learned that Robert and Clara were in love, he flew into a jealous rage so that they had to seek permission from the courts because they were under age.  The Schumann's traveled extensively throughout Europe giving performances.  In 1854 when Clara was pregnant with their eighth child, Robert unsuccessfully tried to drown himself in the Rhine and was sent to an insane asylum.  The widow was forced to tour ten months a year to support her large family.  Clara even had other expenses because one son also was in a mental hospital, another was ill, and another was a drug addict.  Clara had many friends including Johannes Brahms, Franz Liszt, and Felix Mendelssohn.  This biography is as interesting and versatile as the subject; Clara's was a composer, teacher, editor, and mother.  Because she was successful in a field completely dominated by men, Clara was a role model for her times and for today.  This biography is also a model for excellence and will be enjoyed by music lovers of all ages.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center    

Woog, Adam.  THE IMPORTANCE OF FRANK SINATRA.  The Importance Of
    series.  Farmington Hills, MI:  Lucent/Gale, 2001.  108 p.  1-56006-749-7; lib.bdg.,
    $27.45    Gr. 6-10     782.42   or   92

    This is one of 50+ titles in "The Importance of..." series including biographies of individuals from the worlds of politics, sports, music, art, literature, science, and religion.  Within the larger context of the entire series the reader might find the answer to the first question that springs to the reviewer's mind, " What middle school student would find Frank Sinatra important?"  As stated in the Forward, "Each volume attempts to emphasize an individual's contribution both in his or her own time and for posterity."   Primary and secondary sources are used and quotes are footnoted.  This volume includes photographs, bibliography, chronology and an index.  It serves as an example of how a biographer researches a subject as well as a view of the life, times, and contributions of the subject.  Chapters are prefaced with a quote and bold subtitles, black and white photos and boxed excerpts from other works on Sinatra break up long pages of print and pique the reader's interest.  Other features include a bibliography, index, footnotes, and black and white photographs.
    Sinatra is presented as one of the great popular entertainers of his time and as an individual who lived the American Dream.  He was the son of immigrants who rose to fame and fortune through his talent and hard work.  Presenting his foibles and inadequacies as well as his admirable qualities bring him to life as a "real" person.  Pete Hamill writes that, " One reason he continues to matter is that he perfected the role of the Tender Tough Guy - an archetype that did not exist in American culture and created a new model for American masculinity."  While some adults may object to exposing middle school students to the less savory side of life in the form of promiscuity and connections to the criminal underworld, most children that age have already heard of the excesses of today's music and sports idols and should be able to put it in perspective.
    Carolyn Anderson, L'Anse; retired elementary teacher
 
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