599 - Woodland Animals

Subjects Listed in This Directory


599 Bears

Barghusen, Laura.  THE BEAR.  Illus. with photos.   SanDiego: Lucent, 1999. 
    96p.  1-56006-394-7;   hb., $15.00.    98-50214   Gr. 4+      599.78

    The Endangered Animals & Habitats series has an attractive addition that merits attention.  Both fun and informative, the book discuses the bears of the world and threats to their existence. These include hunting, international trade, habitat destruction, captivity and the future of bears.  Barghusen presents the material in an easy-to-follow fashion backed up with lots of photographs, maps and even a couple of cartoons.  In addition there is a glossary, a list of organizations to contact and additional works.  It’s a great book if you want the "bear" facts!
    Patricia Fittante; Children's Librarian, Escanaba Public Library, Escanaba, MI
    24 years of experience as a school and public librarian


Deady, Kathleen W.  GRIZZLY BEARS.  Predators in the Wild series.  Mankato,
    MN:  Capstone, 2002.  32p.   0-7368-1063- 3; lib.bdg., $21.26   2001-2925
    Gr. K-3    599.784
 
       This volume is exceptionally well organized and begins with a double-page spread of “Fast Facts about Grizzlies.”  If the reader delved no deeper into the book his knowledge of grizzlies would be enhanced.  There are four chapters, each of which starts with a box superimposed on the introductory photo in which the facts presented in the chapter are listed in a concise form.  This is an excellent instructional tool and assists the young reader in acquiring good study skills.  Statistics are presented in standard and metric form.  A “Myth vs. Fact” page helps to dispel misinformation.  Also included are “Fast Facts,”  “Words to Know,”  “Useful Addresses,” “Internet Sites,” a bibliography, and an index.   Illustrations are color photographs.
      This outstanding book is part of the "Predators in the Wild" series that includes ANACONDAS, GREAT WHITE SHARKS, HAWKS, KILLER WHALES, KIMODO DRAGONS, VAMPIRE BATS and WOLVES.   Every library should strongly consider adding the entire series to their collections if each volume is as well done as this one.  The ex-director of the American Bear Association consulted on this book.  As I review more and more books I become increasingly impressed with the quality of books published by Capstone Press.
    Carolyn Anderson, L'Anse; retired elementary teacher
    L’Anse School and Public Library Advisory Board member  


Preston-Mafham, Rod.  BEARS.  Illus with photos.  The Secret World of series.
    Austin, TX:  Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 2002.  48p.  0-7398-4983-2; lib.bdg., $27.12
    Gr. 2-7    599.78

    Besides explaining what bears are, origins, bears and people, and conservation, there is basic information about food, reproduction, and behavior.  The photos are clear and aesthetically placed on the pages.  Although text is superimposed over a picture of a mountain habitat, the photo is muted and the text is easy to read.  This muted photo provides a background for quick facts as well as a border around each two-page spread.   Other sidebars are highlighted by a circle entitled “I Didn’t Know That” to impart such pictures.  Drawings, and facts such as Koala bears are not really bears, Pandas are very placid and only move from one food source to another, and the origin of the Teddy Bear. The basic information is clear and concise.  A glossary of terms, four age appropriate titles, and an index complete the book.  This is an example of a series book at its best.  Purchase for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist


Wood, Ted.  BEAR DOGS: CANINES WITH A MISSION.  New York:
    Walker, 2001.  32p.  0-8027-8758-4; hb., $16.95  0-8027-8759-2; lib.bdg.,
    $17.85     00-043776  Gr. 2-9  636.73

    Carrie Hunt, a biologist at Glacier National Park, Montana uses Karelian bear dogs (from a region of Finland called Karelia) to scare bears away from human habitations.  Since 1990 Carrie has been teaching these black and white dogs to bark at bears and chase them away.  Bears are attracted to campsites, trash cans, and cars that contain food.  Once bears lose their fear of humans, they are a danger to humans and must be destroyed.  In 1995 Carrie started the Wind River Bear Institute and the Partners in Life program.  The address, in case readers want to contribute “part of your allowance to help support these dog heroes” is discretely in small print at the end of the book with the bibliographical and cataloging information.  A photo of Carrie and her first dog, Cassie, who died in 1999, is also on that page.  The dogs look like Huskies or Border Collies.
    The photos throughout the book are in color and are consistently clear.  The photos show the dogs in training, the dogs in action with bears, and visiting schools.  In one summer, the dogs saved 29 grizzly bears and 39 black bears from being destroyed.   Working dog books are popular and these dogs are virtually unknown even though they provide a valuable service.  Campers will learn from a page called “How to Keep a Good Bear Good” which gives 7 rules for in camp and 3 rules for hikers.  This book will appeal to dog lovers of all types, campers, and areas of the country that have large Finnish populations like Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and Minnesota.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist


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599 Beavers

Rounds, Glen.  BEAVER.  Illus by author.  New York:  Holiday, 1999.  32p.
    0-8234-1440-X; hb., $15.95.  98-28803   K-Gr. 3   599.37

    The large print and full page child like yet realistic color illustrations help children to understand the lifestyle and habits of beavers.  Each text page also has a black line drawing of a beaver on it.  Readers learn how beavers create ponds through their dams.  The book concludes with five fact/fiction questions.   This book is deceptively simple but helps young readers to learn much about beavers.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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599 Birds

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599 Deer, Whitetail

Arnosky, Jim.  ALL ABOUT DEER.  Illus. by author.   New York: Scholastic, 1999.
    24p.  0439058740; pb., $5.99   95-26238    Gr. 1-4     599.73

    Using watercolors and text, Arnosky shares white-tailed deer, mule deer, black-tailed deer, Caribou, Wapiti (Elk), and Moose and even shares sizes and locations.  In double page spreads, deer are viewed from front and back.  Also shown are feet and tracks; ears; names of male, female, and baby; antlers; how they live; jaws; vulnerability to predators; speed; and dangers they face.  This book is up to Arnosky’s standard of excellence.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Bair, Diane and Pamela Wright.  DEER WATCHING: A HOW-TO-GUIDE .  Mankato,
    MN:  Capstone, 2000.  48p.  0-7368-0321-1; lib.bdg., $21.26    Gr. 4-7   599.65

    After an introduction about deer, readers are told how to prepare for deer watching in the first chapter.  In chapter 2, readers learn when to go, what to bring, what to wear, how to behave, how to be safe, and directions on how to build a blind.  Chapter 3 tells where to look for deer feeding areas, public viewing areas, and includes information about seven parks where deer are found.  Chapter 4 is about making observations from tracks, scat, tree markings, camouflage, differences between white-tailed and mule deer, and recording observations.  A field guide to North American deer includes information about white-tailed mule, elk, moose, and caribou.  A glossary, bibliography, addresses, Internet sites, and index complete the book.  Most of this book appears to be written for people who do not live in areas where deer are prevalent and have to go out looking for them.  Readers living in areas also inhabited by deer can best make use of the chapter about making observations and the section about building a blind.  The clear photos add to the value of the book.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director; Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

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599 Moose

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599 Opossum

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599 Skunks

Sousa, D. M.  SKUNKS DO MORE THAN STINK!  Brookfield, CT:  Millbrook,
    2002. 32p.  2001-032958    0-7613-2503-4; lib.bdg., $21.90    Gr. 3-6      599.76

    Sousa helps readers understand skunks by comparing them in size to fluffy cats.  Photos help readers learn more about these animals.  Some facts about skunks include how they warn away other animals with their stripes, hissing and stamping their feet.  If that doesn’t work they lift their tails and spray their enemies.  What skunks eat and how they search for food, preparing for winter, and how skunks help farmers represent some of the types of information about skunks that are found in this book.   The glossary includes a dozen words that were in bold type in the text of the book.  There is a list of four books, one video, and three online sites.  Purchase for areas where the woodland habitat is studied.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist



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599 Porcupines

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599 Squirrels

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599 Rabbits

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599 Raccoons

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599 Wolverines

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599 Other Animals

Otto, Carolyn B.  WOLVES.  Scholastic Science Readers series, Level 2.  Illus with 
    photos. New York:  Scholastic Reference, 2000.  48p.  0-439-29584-X; pb.,$3.99
    Gr. 2-3     599   or   ER

    The colorful photos and the easy sentences provide tons of information about wolves to beginning readers.  The words in bold print are found in the glossary at the end of the book right before the index.  Difficult words have phonetic spelling in parenthesis after the word; the accented syllable is in bold print like regurgitated.  Domesticate appears on both lists.  The book begins with a gray wolf on the Alaskan tundra.   After reading aloud Jean George’s JULIE OF THE WOLVES (Harper, 1973) to second or third graders, children can read more about wolves for themselves.  Use the book when studying biomes (tundra), mammals, endangered species, and ecology.  Shelve with animal books or easy readers.  This is a first purchase for school or public libraries but is essential in Alaska, I Idaho, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist


Barrett, Jalma.   LYNX.    Photos by Larry Allan. Wild Cats of North America Series.
    Woodbridge, CT  Blackbirch,  1999.  24p.  1567112595, hb. $14.95. 98-009881
    Gr. 3-5.   599.75.

     What you wouldn't know if you didn't read books!  Did you know that the lynx is known as "The Cat in a Bow Tie"?  Or that a lynx's paws are so big that it can run on top of snow without sinking?  Or that the lynx has excellent eyesight and that this animal tends to be silent because of the bones in its voice box?  The sounds it produces are small.  Barrett included many interesting and fascinating facts about this animal.   He describes the natural habitat, including physical traits, social life, survival instincts birth and development, and interaction with humans.  Many  unique and detailed photographs grace the text and together they create a well-balanced informative read.  Other books in the series are FERAL CAT, COUGAR, and BOBCAT .
     Patricia Fittantte, Children's Librarian,  Escanaba Public Library
     23 years experience  as a teacher and librarian


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Stories about Woodland Animals

FICTION - Easy Readers and Picture Books featuring woodland animals

Austin, Margot.  A FRIEND FOR GROWL BEAR.  Illus by David McPhail.  New York:
    HarperCollins, 1999.  unp.   0-06-027802-1, hb. $14.95.   97-34347    PreS-Gr. 3      E

    Growl Bear was sad because he didn't have anyone to play with him so he asked Old Owl for advice on how to make friends.  Old Owl told all the forest animals that the little bear did not have any teeth so Rabbit, Squirrel, Mouse, and the songbirds were no longer afraid of him but didn't want to be his friends because he growled at them.    Finally, Old Owl solved the little bear's problem by telling the other animals that he was not trying to scare them but only knew how to say "G-r-r-r."  Besides the value of this book as a story about friendship, Upper Peninsula libraries will want it because it contains animals from the woodlands habitat.  Read the story aloud when teaching about forests.
    Mary Ann Paulin;  Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library media specialist

Cocca-Leffler, Maryann.  BRAVERY SOUP.  Morton Grove, IL: Whitman, 2002.
    32p.  0-8075-0870-5; hb., $15.95     2001-004167     PreS-Gr. 4     E

    Carlin, a raccoon, was afraid of everything.  So Zack the Fox took him to see Big Bear who was making Bravery Soup.  The bear sent Carlin off to get the missing ingredient but the trip was through the Forbidden Forest to Skulk Mountain where the ingredient was in a cave.  The beaver gave him armor, the skunk gave him food, the rabbit gave him a raft to cross the river, and the fox gave him a big stick to fight the monster in the cave.  When Carlin did not return, the friends went to look for him and when they found all their gifts, but no Carlin, they expected the worst.  There are three twists to the story.  The first is how Carlin managed without the gifts from his friends, the second was what he found in the cave, and the third was when he returned with the box and discovered it was empty.  These twists keep the final message from being didactic.  Besides the concept of bravery, the book can be used when studying woodland animals.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist

Edwards, Pamela Duncan.  BRAVO, LIVINGSTONE MOUSE!  Illus by Henry Cole.
    New York:  Hyperion, 2000.  32p. 0-7868-0307-X; hb., $15.99
    0-7868-2247-3; lib.bdg., $16.49  Gr. 1-4  E

    When Livingston Mouse sets off to investigate the Wild Wood, he meets woodpecker, beaver, cicada, foxes, bee, snakes, centipede, grasshopper, frog, katydid, and cricket.  The mouse watches the animals dance and decides “their rhythm is off” so he forms a band to provide the rhythm.  The watercolor and acrylic illustrations present the woodland animals with enough detail that the book can be used when studying those animals.  Fans of LIVINGSTONE MOUSE (Harper, 1998) will enjoy this book also.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Henkes, Kevin.  OH!  Illus by Laura Dronzek.  New York: Greenwillow, 1999.
    24p.  0?688?17053?6;  hb., $15.00   0?688?170054?4; lib.bdg., $14.93
    98?51890    PreS?Gr. 3     E

    The animals that play with children in the new snow are: squirrel, rabbit, cat, dog, and birds.  This title is good for sight reading the word "Oh" for even the youngest child.  The cardinals are called birds but can be identified as cardinals to children when the book is read aloud to them.  This cozy book ends with children returning to a cozy house.  School and public libraries needing easy to read picture books will purchase this book which is an essential purchase in schools where the elementary curriculum includes the study of woodland biomes.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library media specialist

Ryder, Joanne.  A FAWN IN THE GRASS.  Illus by Keiko Narahashi.  New York:
    Holt, 2001.  32p.    0-8050-6236-X; hb., $16.95   00-24284   PreS-Gr. 3   E

    Narahashi uses gouache and watercolors to show a unisex child discovering nature in this first person rhyme.  The illustrations are large enough for children to see during story time, but contain enough details for children to discover later on his/her own.
    The brief rhyming text is suitable for the age group being reached.  Ryder’s inspiration came from a real fawn that lived in the Ryder/Yep yard for several weeks.  Kids will have the fun of trying to find the fawn in the photo that accompanies the Author’s Note.   Teachers can also use this book to introduce the concept of camouflage.  This book is an excellent purchase for any library but is a priority purchase for Upper Peninsula school and public libraries, no matter how small.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library/media specialist

Sams, Carl R. and Jean Stoick.  STRANGER IN THE WOODS.   Illus with photos.
    Milford,  MI:  Carl R. Sams II Photography, 2000.  46p.   0-9671748-0-5; hb. $19.95
    99-95162     PreS-Gr3+      E            (1-800-552-1867)   www.carrlsam.com

    The color photos of wildlife in the woods are definitely the focal point of this picture book and are uniform in quality throughout the book.   Even the end papers are different double spreads of a deer looking at a snowman which provides the answer to the question “Who is the stranger in the woods?”   The text is less engaging although some of it is artistically draped within the pages.   The animals announce:  “Stranger in the Woods!”   They wonder what it could be.   When they see the snowman the animals have to decide who will take a closer look and when the deer does so, they discover that the snowman is made up of good things to eat.   Children peek out of the evergreens (they must have been downwind) and decide to replenish the eyes, nose, and mouth (carrots, nuts, and corn) after they have been eaten by the animals.  A recipe for a snowman is included at the end of the book.
    Use this book to introduce woodland animals: bluejay, snowy owl, deer, mourning doves, beaver, squirrel, porcupine, rabbit, chickadee, mouse, and cardinal.   This book is good for studying winter and the woodland biome.  Because the photos are of real animals and the dialogue is anthropomorphic, the caption at the top of the book , “A Photographic Fantasy,” should be explained to children.  This is a solid purchase, especially in areas with lots of trees and lots of snow.
    Mary Ann Paulin, Director, Superiorland Preview Center
    32 years of experience as a school library media specialist

Schubert, Ingrid and Dieter.  BEAVER’S LODGE.  Illus by authors.
    Asheville, NC:    Front Street, 2001.  40p. 1-8869-10-68-5; hb., $15.95
    00-49503   PreS-Gr. 3    E

    Originally published in the Netherlands, this picture book translates well into English as did previous books about bear and hedgehog; BEAR’S EGGS (FS, 1999) and THERE’S A HOLE IN MY BUCKET (FS, 98).  In this book Beaver works diligently on his lodge but trips and hurts himself.  Hedgehog and bear carry him to Bear’s house to recuperate.  The full-page watercolor of Beaver lying on a bed with his legs tied by foliate to sticks and his tail propped up in a forked stick with mice looking on is both funny and tender.  Hedgehog decides that they need to build a new house for Beaver while he is recuperating.  Hedgehog shows Bear how to do the work and supervises construction.  They brighten up the lodge with shells and surprise Beaver with his new house, which looks funny even to children who don’t know how a beaver lodge is supposed to look.  When they discover that there is no door, Beaver offers a clever solution.  Readers can stop short of the solution and have listeners predict Beaver’s solution. This book can be read aloud when studying woodland animals.  Because hedgehogs are found primarily in Europe, this book can stimulate discussion about different animals in North American woods.  The birch trees are found on both continents.  The gentle humor in these books is shown through text and illustrations making them good choices for school and public libraries.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist

Schubert, Ingrid and Dieter.  THERE’S ALWAYS ROOM FOR ONE MORE .
    Illus by  authors.  Asheville, NC:  Front Street, 2002.  32p.
    1-886910-77-4; hb., $15.95   32p.  PreS-Gr. 3   E
 
    Beaver built himself a raft and all of his friends (Mole, Hedgehog, Hard, Badger, and Bear) want a ride.  When Butterfly gets on the raft, it sinks for the same reason small animals make a difference in folk literature.  Similar stories are two Ukrainian retellings of THE MITTEN by Tresselt (Scholastic, 1964) and by Brett (Scholastic, 1998); Tolstoy’s Russian tale, THE GREAT BIG ENORMOUS TURNIP (Watts, 1968); and   Sorch Nic Leodhas’ Caldecott winning Scottish folksong, THERE’S ALWAYS ROOM FOR ONE MORE (Holt, 1965).  This new version with the butterfly makes this a gentle story for comparison.   Originally published in the Netherlands, this picture book translates well into English as did previous books about bear and hedgehog; BEAR’S EGGS (FS, 1999) and THERE’S A HOLE IN MY BUCKET (FS, 98).
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist

Singer, Marilyn.  QUIET NIGHT.  Illus by John Manders.  New York: Clarion,
    2002.  32p.  0-618-12044-0; hb., $15.00  2001-023098   PreS-Gr.3    E

    This cumulative story in rhyme shares noises of ten creatures beginning with one frog and ending with ten campers. Other creatures are crickets, mosquitoes, mice, raccoons, coyotes, fish, geese, and owls.  This audience participation story also functions as a counting book.  The gouache and color pencil illustrations show the woodland creatures in a humorous manner, illuminated by a full moon.  The last sentence is “What a NOISY night!”  Sharing this book in libraries and homes will also be a noisy activity.  Teachers will use the book to introduce woodland animals.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist

Tafuri, Nancy.  WHERE DID BUNNY GO? A BUNNY AND BIRD STORY.
    Illus by  author.  0-439-16959-3; hb., $15.95.  00-045007  PreS-Gr. 3    E

    The large watercolor and black ink illustrations combine with extra large text to create a story about woodland animals playing hide-and-seek.  The text is easy enough for emerging readers to read themselves.  Teachers who want to introduce woodland animals during the winter will utilize this story.  Besides the best friends, bunny and bird, the other woodland creatures are squirrel and chipmunk.  Although the bird is not identified, it looks like a tufted titmouse.
    Mary Ann Paulin; Director, Superiorland Preview Center, Marquette, MI
    32 years of experience as a school-library media specialist

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