Featured authors
Marty Achatz
Ellen Airgood
Robert Alexander
Helen Cho Anthos
Julie Brooks Barbour
Nancy Barr
Karl Bohnak
Travis Brown
Sally Brunk
Jennifer Burd
Grace Chaillier
Chad Faries
Steve Feffer
Linda Nemec Foster
Randall Freisinger
Eric Gadzinski
John Gubbins
Donald Hall
Steve Hamilton
Sue Harrison
Gordon Henry
Caitlin Horrocks
Jonathan Johnson
Laura Kasischke
L.E. Kimball
April Lindala
Beverly Matherne
Cris Mazza
Mary McMyne
Ander Monson
Jane Piirto
Eileen Pollack
Janeen Rastall
Martin Reinhardt
Janice Repka
Vincent Reusch
Ron Riekki
Catie Rosemurgy
Andrea Scarpino
M. Bartley Seigel
John Smolens
Laszlo Slomovits
Keith Taylor
Russell Thorburn
Eric Torgersen
Emily Van Kley
B. David Warner
Cameron Witbeck
Zoe Zolbrod

Donald Hall, Author and 2006 Poet Laureate
The fourteenth United States Poet Laureate from 2006-2007, Donald Hall was born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1928, and received his formal education from Harvard College and Oxford University. For the past thirty years he has lived on Eagle Pond Farm in rural New Hampshire. He was named the U.S. Poet Laureate in 2006, after a long and successful career in writing.  One of his children's books, Ox Cart Man, earned the 1980 Caldecott Award for a perfect marriage of story by Donald Hall and illustration by Barbara Cooney.

For more information, see links from Poets.org or the Poetry Foundation


Donald Hall
Ron Reikki

Link to a complete list of Riekki's writing
Ron Riekki, Project Director
Ron Riekki wrote the novel U.P. (Ghost Road Press, Great Michigan Read Series and Sewanee Writers' Series nominated) and the poetry chapbooks Leave Me Alone, I'm Bleeding and Poems about Love, Death and Heavy Metal (Gypsy Daughter, &Now Awards nominated). His short story "Heroes" was Pushcart nominated. His writing is published in Oklahoma Review, New Ohio Review, Christian Science Monitor, PANK, Clockhouse Review, Verse Wisconsin, The Toronto Quarterly, and several other pubs. All Saints' Day opened Ruckus Theater's 2010-2011 theater season in Chicago (Time Out Chicago and Windy City Times "Recommended," Chicago Theater Blog and NewCity Chicago "Highly Recommended") and Carol (equity production, Stageworks/Hudson) was selected for Best Ten-Minutes Plays 2012. Lake Superior Theatre is set to produce Riekki's adaptation of Dandelion Cottage this summer; other plays have been performed in TX, MA, VA, IL, NY, MI, and elsewhere. He has books upcoming with Northern Michigan University Press, Wayne State University Press, and Michigan State University Press. Steve Wiig/Two Eyes Productions is working to turn U.P. into a film. Studies include Ph.D., Literature & Creative Writing, WMU; MFA, Creative Writing, UVa; MFA, Theater Arts /Playwriting, Brandeis. A member of the Screen Actors Guild and the Dramatists Guild, he is repped for TV writing by DSA in Beverly Hills.  
Marty Achatz                                                                              back to top
Marty Achatz lives in the Upper Peninsula not far from Lake Superior.  He received his MA in fiction and MFA in poetry from Northern Michigan University.  His book of poems, The Mysteries of the Rosary, (Mayapple Press) was published in 2004.  He is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of English at Northern Michigan University.  Featured on U.P. the Podcast


Marty Achatz
Chad Faries Chad Faries                                                                                        back to top
Chad Faries is the author of two poetry collections, The Border Will Be
Soon (Emergency Press, 2006) and The Book of Knowledge (Vulgar Marsala Press, 2010). His memoir, Drive Me Out of My Mind: 24 Houses in 10 Years (Emergency Press, 2011) chronicles five unhinged women in 1970s Upper  Peninsula. He can also be seen raconteuring with the Unchained Tour. He has a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and was a Fulbright Fellow in Budapest. He has lived extensively and taught in Central Europe. Chad Faries is an Associate Professor at Savannah State University where he also hosts a theme-based storytelling and music program on WHCJ 90.3. He now owns a house in Thunderbolt, Georgia, but lives abroad and gets lost on his motorcycle whenever he can, especially in Iron County, Michigan.         U.P. the Podcast
Ellen Airgood                                                                                  back to top
Ellen Airgood runs a small diner with her husband in Grand Marais, Michigan, where she is both the waitress and the baker.  She learned most of what she knows about story, as well as about charity and compassion, from waiting tables for 19 years, listening and watching the lives of all her regular customers, young and old.  South of Superior is her first novel.  Learn more at:
www.ellenairgood.com.

Ellen airgood
Catie Rosemurgy Catie Rosemurgy                                                                                 back to top
Catie Rosemurgy is the author of two collections of poetry, My Favorite Apocalypse and The Stranger Manual, both published by Graywolf Press. Her work has appeared in such places as American Poetry Review, The Gettysburg Review, and Ploughshares. She is the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation award and a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship. She grew up in Escanaba, Michigan and spends time there every year.  She currently lives in Philadelphia and teaches at The College of New Jersey.  Read a few of Catie's poems.

Steve Hamilton                  Featured on U.P. the Podcast                         back to top
Steve Hamilton is the two-time Edgar Award-winning, New York Times bestselling author of the Alex McKnight series, featuring an ex-Detroit police officer relocated to the Upper Peninsula town of Paradise. (Die a Stranger, the newest book in the series, will be out in July 2012.) He’s either won or been nominated for every other major crime fiction award in America and the UK, and his books are now translated into fifteen languages. In 2006, he received the Michigan Author Award from the Michigan Library Association and the Michigan Center for the Book, recognizing  his overall body of work. Hamilton attended the University of Michigan, where he won the prestigious Hopwood Award for writing. He currently lives in upstate New York with his wife and children. 
Steve Hamilton
Jonathan Johnson Jonathan Johnson                                                                                back to top
Jonathan Johnson is the author of Hannah and the Mountain: Notes Toward a Wilderness Fatherhood (University of Nebraska Press, 2005) and two poetry collections, Mastadon, 80% Complete (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2001) and In the Land We Imagined Ourselves (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2010).  His poems have appeared in Best American Poetry and numerous other anthologies, as well as Southern Review, Ploughshares, North American Review, and The Prairie Schooner.  Johnson is a professor at the Inland Northwest Center for Writers, the MFA program at Eastern Washington University.  He spends as much time as he can in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and the secluded log cabin that he and his wife built on the Johnson family farm in northern Idaho.   
Cris Mazza                                                                                      back to top
Cris Mazza has authored sixteen books, most recently Various Men Who Knew Us as Girls, a novel. Her other fiction titles include Waterbaby, Trickle-Down Timeline, and In 1995 & 1996, Mazza was co-editor for the original Chick-Lit anthologies: Chick-Lit: Postfeminist Fiction, and Chick-Lit 2: No Chick Vics. In 2006, her essay “Who’s Laughing Now: Chick Lit and the Perversion of a Genre,” explaining the co-opting and corrosion of the title, appeared in Poets & Writers Magazine. In addition to fiction, Mazza also has published a memoir, Is It Sexual Harassment Yet? Indigenous: Growing Up Californian, and has another hybrid memoir, Something Wrong With Her, forthcoming from Jadid Ibis Press. A native of Southern California, Mazza grew up in San Diego County. She currently lives 50 miles west of Chicago and is a professor in the Program for Writers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  

Cris Mazza

Ander Monson Ander Monson                                                                                     back to top
Ander Monson is the author of a host of paraphernalia including a decoder wheel, several chapbooks and limited edition letterpress collaborations, a website <http://otherelectricities.com>, and five books, most recently The Available World (poetry, Sarabande, 2010) and Vanishing Point: Not a Memoir (nonfiction, Graywolf, 2010). Originally from Houghton, Michigan, he lives and teaches in Tucson, Arizona, where he edits the magazine DIAGRAM <thediagram.com> and the New Michigan Press.


Laura Kasischke                                                                            back to top
Laura Kasischke (pronounced Ka-ZISS-kee) was raised in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She has published eight novels, two of which have been made into feature films—“The Life Before Her Eyes,”and  “Suspicious River—and eight books of poetry. She has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as several Pushcart Prizes and numerous poetry awards and her writing has appeared in Best American Poetry, The Kenyon Review, Harper’s and The New Republic. She has a son and step-daughter and lives with her family and husband in Chelsea, Michigan.  Link to Laura Kasischke online.

Laura Kasischke

Steve Feffer


Steve Feffer                                                                                                          back to top
Steve Feffer’s plays have been produced or developed by theatres that include the O'Neill National Playwrights Conference, Ensemble Studio Theatre (New York), Philadelphia Festival Theatre, Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, Stages Repertory Theatre (Houston), National Jewish Theatre (Chicago), Whole Art Theatre (Kalamazoo), Ruckus Theatre (Chicago), and Untitled Theatre #61 (New York).  Steve’s play “And Yet…” was published in Best American Short Plays 2010-11 (Applause Books); and his play “Little Airplanes of the Heart” was published in Best American Short Plays 1997-98 (Applause). Steve has won a number of national playwriting awards including the New Jewish Theatre Project Award from the Foundation for Jewish Culture for "Ain’t Got No Home," the Southwest Plays Award for a Play for Young Audiences for "The House I Call Love," and the Jamie Hammerstein Award from Ensemble Studio Theatre for “Little Airplanes.”  Steve’s writing on theatre and performance is published in journals that include Comparative Drama, Journal of Popular Music StudiesThe Journal of Jewish Literary History, and Third Coast; and in the books "Interrogating America Through Theatre and Performance" (Palgrave) and "Teaching Literature in Virtual Worlds" (Routledge).  Steve is a professor in the Creative Writing Program at Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI), where he directs the graduate and undergraduate playwriting programs. 

Jennifer Burd                                                                                  back to top
Jennifer Burd has had poetry published in numerous journals, most recently in Modern Haiku and Modern Poetry Journal. Her full-length book of poems, Body and Echo, was published by PlainView Press in 2010. She is also the author of a book of creative nonfiction, Daily Bread: A Portrait of Homeless Men & Women of Lenawee County, Michigan (Bottom Dog Press, Inc., 2009, with photographs by Lad Strayer), based on her experiences reporting on local homelessness for the Adrian, Michigan, Daily Telegram newspaper. Burd received her BA in English and her MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Washington. She currently works as an editor and writer for HighScope Educational Research Foundation in Ypsilanti, Michigan.  
Jennifer Burd
Linda Nemec Foster
Linda Nemec Foster                                                                             back to top
Linda Nemec Foster is a poet, writer, and teacher of community workshops. Foster is the author of nine collections of poetry (four full-length books and five chapbooks). Her full-length books include Living in the Fire Nest (Ridgeway Press, 1996), Amber Necklace from Gdansk (LSU Press, 2001) which was a finalist for the Ohio Book Award, Listen to the Landscape (Eerdmans Publishing, 2006) which was short-listed for the Michigan Notable Book Award, and Talking Diamonds (New Issues Press, 2009) a finalist for ForeWord Magazine's Book of the Year. Her chapbook, Contemplating the Heavens, was the inspiration for jazz pianist Steve Talaga's original composition which was nominated for the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in Music. Foster's work has appeared in over 300 literary journals including The Georgia Review, Nimrod, Indiana Review, Connecticut Review, New American Writing, North American Review, River Styx, Sou'wester, Indiana Review, America, Verse Daily, National Poetry Review, and Mid-American Review. Her poetry has also been published in anthologies in the United States and Great Britain, translated in Europe (Poland and Germany), and produced for the stage. She has received awards from ArtServe Michigan, Arts Foundation of Michigan, the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, the National Writer's Voice, and the Academy of American Poets. In 2008, Foster received the International Creative Arts Award from the Polish American Historical Association in a ceremony at the Polish Embassy in Washington, D.C. She was selected to serve as Grand Rapids' first Poet Laureate from 2003-05. In 1997, Foster founded the Contemporary Writers Series at Aquinas College and currently is a member of the Series' programming committee.
Sue Harrison                                                                                 back to top
Sue Harrison was raised in the town of Pickford in Michigan’s Eastern Upper Peninsula where she still lives with her husband Neil.  Harrison graduated summa cum laude from Lake Superior State University in 1971. Prior to the publication of her novels, she was employed at Lake Superior State University as a writer and acting director of the Public Relations Dept. and as an adjunct instructor of creative writing. In 1992, Harrison was named the University's Distinguished Alum. She served on their Board of Regents from 1994-2002.  Harrison’s first novel, MOTHER EARTH FATHER SKY, was a national and international bestseller and was named by the American Library Association as one of 1991’s Best Books for Young Adults. Her other novels include MY SISTER THE MOON, BROTHER WIND, SONG OF THE RIVER, CRY OF THE WIND, CALL DOWN THE STARS, and SISU. Her novels have been honored as main and featured selections of the Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Clubs. SISU was named a National Accelerated Reader’s Book. On location in Japan, she worked with Japanese Public Television (NHK) in the production of a documentary about preserving the environment of Tokyo Bay.  Harrison’s novels have been published in more than twenty countries and in thirteen languages. She is a Distinguished Service Award Honoree of the Michigan Delta Kappa Gamma Educator’s Sorority. She is a member of the Society of Midland Authors, The Authors Guild, the American Christian Fiction Writers, and the Upper Peninsula Publishers and Authors Association.
Sue Harrison
Check out Sue's website at: www.sueharrison.com


Caitlin Horrocks Caitlin Horrocks                                                                                 back to top
Caitlin Horrocks is author of the story collection,  This Is Not Your City, a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice, a Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, and named one of the top 100 books of 2011 by the San Francisco Chronicle. Her stories appear in The New Yorker, The Best American Short Stories 2011, The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2009, The Pushcart Prize XXXV, The Paris Review, and elsewhere. Her work has won awards including the Plimpton Prize and a Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference Fellowship. She is a fiction editor at West Branch, and teaches at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan.  
Visit her website at: www.caitlinhorrocks.com.
Gordon Henry                                                                               back to top
Both poet and novelist, Gordon Henry is an enrolled member of the White Earth Chippewa Tribe of Minnesota.  An Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Michigan State University, he remains rooted in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan.  He is the Senior Editor of the American Indian Studies Series at Michigan State University Press.  His first novel, The Light People, won an American Book Award in 1995.  Henry's poetry and fiction is anthologized in various collections including, Songs From This Earth on Turtle's Back, Earth Song, Sky Spirit, Stories Migrating Home, Returning the Gift, Children of the Drangonfly, and Nothing But the Truth.  In 2004, Henry and George Cornell co-authored a middle school text on the Ojibway for Masoncrest Publishing.  His poetry, fiction and interviews have been translated and published in Spain, Italy and Greece.  For the past fifteen years, Henry has been involved in carrying on the Thirsty Dance Ceremony as handed down to him by Francis (EagleHeart) Cree.          
Gordon Henry
Beverly Matherne

Find out more at:  www.beverlymatherne.com
Beverly Matherne                                                                                back to top
Beverly Matherne, who is approaching her third year as the new poetry editor of Passages North literary magazine, is also director of the Visiting Writers Series in the Department of English at Northern Michigan University. She is the author of four bilingual books and two chapbooks. Bayou des Acadiens (Blind River), short fiction and prose poetry, is forthcoming from Les Éditions Perce-Neige in 2014. Her latest book, Lamothe-Cadillac, a collection of linked prosed poems endorsed by Jim Harrison, is from Les Éditions Tintamarre. She has two previous titles from Cross-Cultural Communications of New York. Two chapbooks from March Street Press and Ridgeway Press launched Beverly’s career as poet in 1994, when she read from them in English and French on Grace Cavalieri’s The Poet and the Poem, live from Washington, D.C. Beverly has received eight first-place prizes, including the Hackney Literary Award for Poetry and a Sojourn “Best of Submission” translation award. Four of her poems have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. In all, she has done 270 readings across the U.S., Canada, and France, and in Wales, Belgium, Spain, and Germany―from Tulane University to Cornell University, from Cody’s Books of Berkeley to Shakespeare & Company in Paris, to the United Nations in New York. Her work appears in many literary magazines across the country, including Interdisciplinary Humanities, Kansas Quarterly, Metamorphoses, Platte Valley Review, and Verse. She also has work in anthologies from publishing houses such as Beacon Press, Louisiana State University Press, New Rivers Press, and Wayne State University Press. Her work has appeared in poetry exhibitions in Paris, New York, Montreal, and Quebec, and in international literary magazines and anthologies. Finally, she is one of eight writers, including Samuel Beckett, whose bilingual writing process is under study in a completed doctoral dissertation from the University of Paris III (la Nouvelle Sorbonne).
Andrea Scarpino                                                                            back to top
Andrea Scarpino is the author of the chapbook The Grove Behind (Finishing Line Press) and a forthcoming full-length collection from Red Hen Press. She received an MFA in Creative Writing from The Ohio State University, has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and teaches with Union Institute and University's Cohort Ph.D. program in Interdisciplinary Studies. She is a weekly contributor for the blog, Planet of the Blind. Follow Andrea online at: www.andreascarpino.com.
Andrea Scarpino
Lazlo Slomovits Laszlo Slomovits                                                                                  back to top
Laszlo Slomovits is one of the twin brothers in Ann Arbor's nationally-known children’s folk music duo, Gemini (GeminiChildrensMusic.com) and has given concerts throughout the U.S. A number of his award-winning songs are featured in songbooks music teachers use throughout the country. In addition to his performances, song-writing, and recording for children, Laszlo has also recorded five CDs of the poetry of Rumi and Hafiz, 12th and 13th Century Sufi Mystics, in translations by Coleman Barks and Daniel Ladinsky, which he has set to music (PoetryIntoSong.com)
 
Keith Taylor                                                                                   back to top
Poet and writer Keith Taylor coordinates the undergraduate program in creative writing at the University of Michigan, directs the Bear Riber Writer's Conference, and is the poetry editor for Michigan Quarterly Review.  He has published thirteen volumes: collections of poetry and short fiction, edited volumes, and translations. His work has appeared in such publications as Story, The Los Angeles Times, Alternative Press, The Southern Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, Notre Dame Review, The Iowa Review, Witness, Chicago Tribune, and Hanging Loose. His most recent books are Marginalia for a Natural History published by Black Lawrence Press and Ghost Writers, a collection of ghost stories co-edited with Laura Kasischke, published by Wayne State University Press.  
Keith Taylor
Eric Gadzinski

Eric Gadzinski                                                                                     back to top
Eric Gadzinski has taught English at LSSU since 1995. One of the founders of LSSU’s creative writing program and of the literary journal now called Border Crossing, he teaches creative writing and poetry. He holds a PhD in English from Temple University, where he wrote his dissertation on American soldier poetry of the Vietnam War. Aside from his academic research and publication in the poetry of war and modern American poetry generally, his own poetry has been published widely in a variety of online and print journals, and one of his poems was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2006.  He has been a regular workshop leader at the annual Creative Writing Festival held at the University of Wisconsin, Whitewater. He is currently preparing a poetry collection for publication.  In addition, he is editing a collection of poems and stories by State Prison inmates, following a year and a half long workshop he was invited to conduct. Before coming to LSSU, he taught writing, developmental writing, and literature at Temple.         

Zoe Zolbrod                                                                                   back to top

Zoe Zolbroad is a writer, editor, traveler, and parent. Her novel, CURRENCY, came out from Other Voices Books in 2010. It won a Nobbie Award and was selected as an honorable mention by Friends of American Writers. Set in Thailand, CURRENCY is about a Thai man and an American woman who together become embroiled in dangerous schemes.

Zoe Zolbrod
Robert Alexander Robert Alexander                                                                                back to top
Robert Alexander grew up in Massachusetts. He attended the University of Wisconsin, and for several years taught in the Madison public schools. After receiving his Ph.D. in English from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, he worked for many years as a freelance editor. From 1993-2001, he was a contributing editor at New Rivers Press, also serving from 1999-2001 as New Rivers' creative director. He is currently co-editor, with Nickole Brown, of the Marie Alexander Poetry Series at White Pine Press. He divides his time between southern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.                                             Find out more at: www.robertalexander.info
Janeen Rastall                                                                                back to top
Janeen Rastall lives in Gordon, MI. She received a BA in English from Penn State University, but spent decades as a computer analyst. She is a member of the Marquette Poets Circle. Her poems have appeared in *The Raleigh Review, The Blue Lake Review, Apparatus Magazine* and *Short, Fast and Deadly*.
Janeen Rastall
Julie Brooks Barbour Julie Brooks Barbour                                                                         back to top
Julie Brooks Barbour received her MFA from UNC-Greensboro and is the recipient of a 2001 Artist Enrichment Grant from Kentucky Foundation for Women.  Her chapbook, Come to Me and Drink is forthcoming from Finishing Line Press in 2012.  Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Kestrel, Waccamaw, UCity Review, Migrations: Poetry and Prose for Life's Transitions, and Bigger Than They Appear: Anthology of Very Short Poems.  Her book reviews have appeared at The Rumpus and Barn Owl Review. Barbour teaches at Lake Superior State University, where she is co-editor of the journal Border Crossing.                                       Featured on U.P. the Podcast

Janice Repka                                                                                   back to top
Janice Repka’s short stories and poetry have appeared in journals such as Potomac Review, The Louisiana Review, Writer’s Journal, and Antietam Review. She is also the author of two novels, The Stupendous Dodgeball Fiasco, a Junior Library Selection and 2008 Nebraska Golden Sower Award Honor Book, and The Clueless Girl’s Guide to Being a Genius, both published by Dutton Children’s Books. She is an Assistant Professor of English and Creative writing at Lake Superior State University, and a founder of the LSSU Visiting Writer Reading Series. She has a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Law and a MFA in Creative Writing from McNeese State University.  Find out more at www.janicerepka.com
       

Janice Repka
Vincent Reusch Vincent Reusch                                                                                                        back to top
Vincent Reusch attended Western Michigan University’s Ph.D. program in Creative Writing, where he studied with fiction writers Jaimy Gordon and Stuart Dybek. His recent work has been published in Madison Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, Big Fiction and elsewhere. He was the winner of Roanoke Review's 2006 fiction prize, runner-up in the DANA Awards Portfolio Contest, and runner-up and finalist in a number of other national fiction contests. He has just finished a collection of stories and is at work on a novel, set in northern Michigan. Research for this novel has been aided by a grant from the Lakes Region Arts Council. He teaches English at Concordia College, in Moorhead, Minnesota. Link to a selection by Reusch.   
Eileen Pollack                                                                                back to top
Eileen's new novel, Breaking and Entering, published in January 2012 by Four Way Books, was awarded the 2012 Grub Street National Book Prize and named a New York Times Editor's Choice selection. The novel follows the experiences of Louise and Richard Shapiro, who, with their young daughter, Molly, move from ulta-liberal Marin County, California, to a quaint, rural town in the Midwest, only to discover that most of their neighbors belong to the Michigan Militia.  Eileen has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Michener Foundation, the Rona Jaffe Foundation, and the Massachusetts Arts Council. Her stories have appeared in journals such as Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, Michigan Quarterly Review, SubTropics, Agni, and New England Review. Her novella, The Bris was chosen to appear in the Best American Short Stories 2007 anthology, edited by Stephen King. She lives in Ann Arbor and is a member of the faculty of the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Michigan.   
Eileen Pollack
Find more information at www.eileenpollack.com.
Sally Brunk Sally Brunk                                                                                                               back to top
Sally R. Brunk (Lac du Flambeau/Ojibwa) is Bear Clan and the youngest of eight children.  She was born and raised on the Keweenaw Bay Indian Reservation.  She credits Northern Michigan University and Michigan Technological University in her educational journey.  She enjoys writing short stories and poetry, centering on the bond of family and the Anishinabe way of life.  Her work has appeared in SAIL, C-Literary Magazine, Sinister Wisdom, Moccasin Telegraph and Quiet Mountain Essays.  She was recently published in the anthologies Sharing Our Stories of Survival - Native Women Surviving Violence and Voice on the Water: Great Lakes Native America Now.  She has her own book of poetry entitled The Cliffs - Summer Soundings with paintings by Jim Denomie. 

Nancy Barr                                                                                   back to top 
A transplant to Michigan's Upper Peninsula at the age of 9, Nancy Barr grew up in the tiny town of Rapid River nestled at the top of Little Bay de Noc. She earned an associate's degree from Bay College and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Lake Superior State University.  Her favorite memories as a young child are of weekly trips to the neighborhood library with her late mother to spend hours poring over books of all kinds.  Nancy Barr was a reporter and editor for 10 years at two U.P. daily newspapers. She now works at MTU in the mechanical engineering department and earned an M.S. in Rhetoric and Technical Communications in 2011. When not writing, Nancy enjoys hiking and photographing the natural beauty that abounds in the Upper Peninsula. Her novels include "Page One: Hit and Run" (July 2006), "Page One: Vanished" (May 2007), and "Page One: Whiteout" (November 2009), all from Arbutus Press.

Nancy Barr

Jane Piirto Jane Piirto                                                                                                                 back to top
Jane Piirto is a native of Ishpeming, in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, to which all four of her grandparents emigrated from Finland.  She is Trustee's Distinguished Professor at Ashland University in Ohio.  Her novel won the Carpenter Press 10th Anniversary First Novel Award.  She has received two individual Artist Fellowships from the Ohio Arts Council--one in poetry and one in fiction, and is listed as both a poet and a writer in the Directory of American Poets and Writers.  She has received a Fulbright Grant to Argentina.  She was named an Ohio Magazine educator of distinction, was awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Northern Michigan University, and is the recipient of the Mensa Lifetime Achievement Award.  Visit her homepage at: http://personal.ashland.edu/jpiirto
L.E. Kimball                                                                                  back to top
L.E. Kimball's stories have appreared in top literary journals including the Alaska Quarterly Review, the Massachusetts Review, Lynx Eye, Orchid, and Washington Square.  Her first novel, A Good High Place, was published June 2010 by Northern Illinios Unitersity.  Her essays have been published in dozens of venues such as ByLine, Heartland Boating, Country Almanac, Exceptional Parent and The Detroit News op.ed. section.  Her latest fiction piece, set in the Upper Peninsula just appeared in the March/April 2012 issue of Gray's Sporting Journal.  She is working on her MFA in Creative Writing at Northern Michigan University and working on her second novel which is a novel of linked stories - all set in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.  She lives with her son and dog part of the year in Marquette, Michigan, and the rest of the year near Tahquamenon Falls where she lives off the grid on a trout stream.  
L.E. Kimball

Cameron Witbeck Cameron Witbeck                                                                                                    back to top
Cameron Witbeck is a 24 year old writer from Michigan. When he isn’t working as an associate poetry editor for Passages North literary magazine or studying in the MFA program at Northern Michigan University, he enjoys hunting and milling about in the woods. His work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Rosebud, Cream City Review, Controlled Burn, Strongverse and others.

Mary McMyne                                                                                                   back to top
Mary McMyne teaches creative writing and fiction at Lake Superior State University, and edits Border Crossing, the LSSU Creative Writing Program’s journal of art and literature. She earned her Master of Fine Arts in fiction from New York University, and another Master’s in English and creative writing from Louisiana State University, where she studied literature, theory, fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and screenwriting. McMyne is currently finishing two novels, one of which won the Faulkner Prize for a Novel in Progress in 2007. Her other honors include winning the Robert Olen Butler Short Story Award in 2001 and the Tony Bill Screenwriting Award in 2002 while at LSU. Her fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and photography have been published in Double Dealer, New Delta Review, Exquisite Corpse: A Journal of Letters and Life, The Nervous Breakdown, Country RoadsWeb del Sol..
Mary McMyne

Emily Van Kley Emily Van Kley                                                                                                       back to top
Emily Van Kley grew up in rural Upper Michigan, where she learned to ski, waitress, and write about snow. Now, she makes her home in Washington state where she works at a collective food coop, gardens the vacant lot next to her apartment, writes, and gripes about the rain. She received an MFA from the Inland Northwest Center for Writers in Spokane.  She won last year's Iowa Review Award for Poetry, and is a 2009 winner of the Florida Review Editor's Prize." Van Kley's poems have received honorable mention for the Joy Harjo and Oberon poetry prizes.  Her fiction has appeared in The Republic of Letters and Faultline.

John Smolens                                                                                                     back to top
John Smolens
is author of many critically-acclaimed novels, including THE SCHOOLMASTER'S DAUGHTER (Pegasus Books, 2011), COLD (Shaye Areheart/Harmony Books, 2001), THE INVISIBLE WORLD (Shaye Areheart/Harmony Books, 2002),  FIRE POINT (Shaye Areheart/Harmony Books, 2004), and the THE ANARCHIST (Shaye Areheart Books, 2009).  He is also author of two other novels, WINTER BY DEGREES (Dutton, 1988 and Avon Books, 1990) and ANGEL’S HEAD (Norton, 1994), and a short story collection, MY ONE AND ONLY BOMB SHELTER (Carnegie Mellon, 2000).  He holds degrees from Boston College, the University of New Hampshire, and the University of Iowa.  In 2006 he was the recipient of a Distinguished Faculty Award from Northern Michigan University. 
John Smolens
Visit his website at
www.johnsmolens.com
Russ Thorburn Russell Thorburn                                                                                                     back to top
Russell Thorburn is the author of four
books of poems. In Misfit Hearts his most recent book, he chronicles the making of The Misfits through the filming-location photographs of Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe and Montgomery Clift.  He has received numerous grants, including a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.  His radio play, Happy Birthday James Joyce, was aired three times on WNMU F.M., and featured Jim Edwards as James Joyce. For ten years, Thorburn conducted writing workshops in Upper Peninsula schools, funded by the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs. Currently, he teaches writing and literature at Northern Michigan University, in Marquette, where he lives with his wife and sons. 
Eric Torgersen                                                                               back to top
Eric Torgersen is Professor Emeritus of English at Central Michigan University. He's published eight books and chapbooks of poetry, fiction and non-fiction. His next poetry collection, Heart. Wood, will be published in July 2012 by Word Press. His essays, stories, poems and translations have appear in American Poetry Review, Hudson Review, Gettysburg Review, Field, Epoch, Pleiades, New Letters, New Ohio Review and other journals.


Eric Torgersen
April Lindala April Lindala                                                                                      back to top
April Lindala (Grand River Six Nations) has lived in Marquette since 1988 when she first attended Northern Michigan University as an undergraduate. She completed her master's degree in English in 2003  and Master of Fine Arts in English in 2006, with a concentration in creative non-fiction writing. April has had several poems published in various anthologies and publications.  Most recently, she was the project director and assistant editor for the anthology, Voice on the Water: Great Lakes Native America Now. The book also features two of her poems.  She is currently the director of the Center for Native American Studies at NMU.

Randall Freisinger                                                                                             back to top
Randall R. Freisinger's poems have appeared in numerous literary magazines and anthologies for five decades and have been nominated five times for a Pushcart Prize.  He has published four collections of Poema: Running Patterns (1985 Flume Press, National Chapbook Prize), Hand Shadows (Green Tower Press, 1988), Plato's Breath (1996 May Swenson Poetry Prize, Utah State University Press), and Nostalgia's Thread: Ten Poems on Norman Rockwell Paintings (Hol Art Books, 2009).  From 1988 to 2003, he served as Associate Editor for The Laurel Review.  He was born and raised in Kansas City, Missouri and earned BJ, MA, and PhD degrees from the University of Missouri-Columbia.  Since 1977, he has lived in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, were he is Emeritus Professor of Rhetoric, Literature, and Creative Writing in the Department of Humanities at Michigan Technological University. 
Randall Freisinger

M. Bartley Seigel M. Bartley Seigel                                                                                back to top
M. Bartley Seigel is the author of This Is What They Say (poetry, Typecast, 2012) and his words have appeared in H_NGM_N, The Lumberyard, Michigan Quarterly Review, Forklift Ohio, DIAGRAM, and elsewhere. He is the founding editor of the literary arts collective, [PANK] <http://www.pankmagazine.com>. He lives and teaches in Houghton, Michigan.

Grace Chaillier                                                                         back to top
Grace is a registered tribal citizen of the Sicangu Lakota band of the Rosebud Sioux whose reservation is located in south central South Dakota. She earned her baccalaureate degree in English with a minor in Native American Studies in December 2002 and her master's degree in English Literature in May of 2004 from NMU. She continued her education at Northern and earned a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, a terminal master's degree, with a focus on creative nonfiction graduating with her third degree from NMU in May of 2008. She taught Native American Literature at Ferris State University in the summer of 2004 and began teaching the Native American Experience course at NMU in January of 2005. She wrote the curriculum for and continues to teach two other courses at NMU: the History of Indian Boarding School Education and American Indian Humor. Recently, Grace co-edited the book Voice on the Water: Great Lakes Native America Now. Voice is an anthology collaboration of over 80 artists, authors, and writers that illuminates the American Indian experience in Michigan. 
Grace Chaillier
Martin Reinhardt

Martin Reinhardt                                                                           back to top  
Dr. Martin Reinhardt is an Anishinaabe Ojibway citizen of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians from Michigan. He is an assistant professor of Native American Studies at Northern Michigan University, and is the co-owner and education division director of First Nations, LLC. He is a former research associate for the Interwest Equity Assistance Center at Colorado State University, and the former vice president for diversity and research for Educational Options, Inc.  He has taught courses in American Indian education, tribal law and government, and sociology. He has a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership from the Pennsylvania State University, where his doctoral research focused on Indian education and the law with a special focus on treaty educational provisions. Martin has previously served as: a member of the Michigan Indian Education Council; Chair of the American Association for Higher Education American Indian/Alaska Native Caucus; Co-Primary Investigator for the Michigan Rural Systemic Initiative; and as an external advisor for the National Indian School Board Association. He also holds both a Bachelor's and a Master’s degree in Sociology.

Helen Cho Anthos                                                                         back to top
Helen Cho Anthos lives in Los Angeles, California and is the founder of Big Blue Tree Media.  It has been said that she has the brain of a techie and the heart of an artist.  In the App world, she and her partner created the first digital comic book / graphic novel reader for the iPhone.  Within 2 years Kamikaze had received an App Store Pick of the Week and 2 Apple Staff Favorite acknowledgements.  As a inematographer she has shot 5 shorts which have won awards in various festivals (Slamdance, Digidance, Outfest, Santa Fe).  She was the Director of Photography on iDesign, a Fine Living Channel show, for 2 seasons and continues to shoot and produce music videos, commercials, and upcoming television projects.  She is currently shooting footage on the U.P. Book Tour.  
Helen Cho Anthos
B. David Warner B. David Warner                                                                                back to top
While having written just two novels, B. David Warner is no stranger to the world of fiction - he spent 40+ years writing advertising copy.  Dead Lock is a mystery/thriller set in Sault Sainte Marie in 1943 - the story of a young woman who travels to the Soo to work on her uncle’s newspaper. Investigating the murder of a close friend, she runs headlong into a Nazi plot to take out the locks and change the course of WWII. His latest, Freeze Frame 2016, is set in Detroit and Gaylord, Michigan. Just days from the 2016 presidential election, ad executives Darcy James and Sean Higgins discover a terrorist plot to corrupt the election using subliminal advertising. Warner resides in Clarkston with his wife Marlene. He is a graduate of Michigan State University where he majored in advertising. He decided on advertising as a career, he says, “Because I was too nervous to steal.”
Visit him at www.bdavidwarner.com               
Travis Brown                                                                               back to top
Travis Brown was born and raised in the small town of Lincoln, Illinois. He attended the University of Missouri—Kansas City (B.A., English, 2003), before going on to study at New Mexico State University (M.F.A., Poetry, 2006). His poems have appeared widely in literary journals as well as in online magazines, including Salt Hill, Fence, Denver Quarterly, Puerto del Sol, West Branch, Third Coast, Bateau, Verse Daily, Caketrain and Defunct. “In Lieu of Hartshorn,” which collects twenty of his poems into a limited-edition chapbook, was issued by Greying Ghost Press (2011). He has worked with bamboo and with cattle, but mostly he has taught at college campuses and, in one stint, at a medium-max prison. Currently he lives in Wausau, and works at the University of Wisconsin, Marathon County, as a Lecturer in English.    
Travis Brown

Karl Bohnak Karl Bohnak                                                                                  back to top
Weather has been Karl Bohnak's passion since his youth. Karl's interests led him from a communications degree in broadcasting to a BS in Meteorology at the University of Wisconsin. He worked at radio stations in New Hampshire and Wisconsin and later as a television reporter and weather forecaster.  He received his AMS seal in 1988, the same year he accepted a weather anchoring position at WLUC TV-6 in Marquette, Michigan.  A fondness for severe snowstorms drew him to one of the snowiest regions in the United States.  Karl published his UP weather stories in the book entitled So Cold A Sky (2006), based on his research and experience while forecasting weather for more than eighteen years in the Upper Peninsula.  His most recent book is Michigan's Upper Peninsula Almanac (2009).         
John Gubbins                                                                               back to top
Gubbins lives with his wife, Carol, alongside the Escanaba River in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.  His historical essay, “Dame Juliana Berners: The Case of the Missing Sportswoman,” was recently recognized for its scholarship and originality by the North American Conference on British Studies.  Spending his teen age years as a seminarian studying traditional theology and philosophy, he later attended the University of Chicago where he received a graduate degree in humanities and Columbia University Law School where he received a Juris Doctor degree.  After pursuing a big city law career, he came to his senses and settled his family near some of the Midwest’s greatest trout streams. He spends his free time with Carol and his son Alex fishing, camping, and poetry reading.   
John Gubbins

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